Primary Source

Bill Klein

Name: Bill Klein

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

Taught there for 35 years.

 

Local businesses

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

They had everything. Whatever we needed.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Tony & Johnny’s

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

No storage locker.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

Rena’s Café – great pies

XXX Root Beer

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Yes, from the day they opened.

Chocolate cherries & divinity.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

None.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

It was on Front Street – where the florist shop is now.

 

Local Politics

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

Yes. A mistake.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

Was a child living at home.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

Big Labor Day Parades.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Fishing with Dad when we lived in Seattle. Drove through Issaquah on our way to Maloney’s Grove (outside of North Bend).

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

Rainbow trout and cutthroat trout.

 

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

Has made Issaquah well known.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

Yes – by car.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

Brought more people.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

Studebaker.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

That’s Entertainment – 1974

75¢

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

Musical recitals at the Baptist Church and the Lutheran Church.

Paul Koss

Paul Koss

Paul Koss

Name: Paul Koss

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

I fished all the time and caught many trout, the biggest was a  six pound  Donaldson trout.  I lived only one block from the creek and spent many hours fishing in the early fall and the water off color.

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

I worked half a day at a logging camp near North Bend but quit as it seemed too dangerous; setting chokers.

 

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

I remember them well as I worked at the Monohon Mill and the Preston Mill.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

I was standing in front of the pool hall when a man pulled up to get the car with the hose.  I climbed in the car and had a bumpy ride to Monohon.  I helped get furniture out of the houses but unfortunately it all burned up and the houses also.  Very nice furniture.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

Many people come to watch the salmon when they spawn. It has given Issaquah a lot of publicity.

 

Farming and Dairy

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

I was hired to hoe corn at 25 cents an hour but it was a hot day and I don’t  believe I collected any money nor finished a row.

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

No

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

I traveled often to Seattle via Renton and Rainier Ave.  I worked there in several tunnels (Pike Street and University District) also attended movies at the old Pantages and Orphium.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

Made it much shorter to go to Seattle, also more traffic and development in Issaquah.  It changed Issaquah from a small town to a city.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

First car was a Chevrolet Landau Sedan; purchased in Renton.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I belonged to the Lions Club and the Eagles and the Sportsman’s Club.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

I am the last survivor of the Rod and Gun Club (later the Sportsman’s Club) and I remember when it was built.  We had turkey shoots and trap shooting.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

I attended a few dances and watched for enemy planes later in the Second World War.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

Yes, I did, even played basketball there.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

When the First World War broke out the government took over the mine from the Germans.  This mine became Pacific Coast Coal.  There was a strike and the strike breakers (Scabs) came, then the mine was shut down.

 

What were the working conditions like in the mine? Which mine did you work for, and what was your job?

I worked for Harris Coal Mine and the conditions were not good as you had to wear tire knee pads and work on your knees.  As my father was putting up a prop a large rock fell and injured him.  I did not work much longer.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

I saw the Indians and Cowboys also the weekly installment of “Pearl White” which I didn’t want to miss, all for 10 cents..  Later I took my daughter to see “Gone With The Wind” and to her embarrassment fell sound asleep.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

I attended the Catholic Church until was about twelve.  The memory I have is that it was very cold and the floor very hard to knell upon.  However, one Easter at the egg hung I found the Golden Egg in a trash can in a hollow stump.

 

Phyllis “Fifi” Krumbah Laughlin

Name: Phyllis “Fifi” Krumbach Laughlin

Birth Date or Year (optional): February 4, 1933

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

I graduated from Issaquah High School in 1951.  There were several teachers that were respected and no doubt influential.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Minnie wasn’t teaching while I was in school, but she was a neighbor living about three blocks away.  She and Jake were wonderful, kind people.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

I well remember the earthquake of 1949, Mom was working at the school cafeteria and I was going to see her about something(?).  The brick chimney on the old Fin Church came tumbling down and I was pretty close!

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I turned out for every sport I could.  The most memorable was in 1951 when Joyce Castagno Lewis and I won the Lakeside League Championship Tennis Doubles.  I believe tennis was the only sport for women in the league.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Our most fun was the time we “piled” into some ones car and went dancing at the local resorts.  French’s Pine Lake, Alexander’s and there was always the Saturday night at the Fire Hall with Leo Labre’ band.

Trouble?  No way!

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

The Honeysuckle owned by Tom Drylie.  Had great Green Rivers, Cherry Cokes and ice cream and who would forget the milkshakes.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

I remember Jimmy Flynn when he worked for Tony and Johnny’s.  He loved to tease and give me candy.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

The memory of the Grange for me was when I was about seven years old.  We had dance recitals upstairs on stage  with all the parents watching and clapping.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

I worked at the first XXX on Sunset next door to Stonebridge Chevrolet.  It was a great place, because everyone came by for something!  Burger, cokes, Root Beer, or fries.  Drive-ins were starting up and the owner wanted me to work outside; trouble was the windows were so small it was hard to see people drive up.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

My dad, Melvin Krumbach was on the city council while Remo Castagno was mayor.

 

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

Stella lived next door to us on Hill Street.  She was no longer Mayor, but as a neighbor she was nice.  P. J. Smith was also a past Mayor and a neighbor.  Also Mrs. Smith had great cookies.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

At the start of the war there were hobos still walking the train tracks and riding the trains.  They would come to our back door for a meal.

We couldn’t go much because of gas ration.  Many of the young people in town had a horse and we spent hours riding in the mountains.

 

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

When the Labor Day parades took place and I was very young I rode on top of George Ek’s ice cream truck.  Then when I got Older I rode my horse in the parade.  I did the Barrel Race one year in the Rodeo.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

I remember the carnival would come to town.  What fun.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Dad would take me to lake Sammamish while he hunted ducks.  I can remember “large” rafts (flocks) of Mallards on the lake.  I loved hiking to Round Lake – Lake Tradition area.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

We used to catch small trout and craydads in the creek.  In the summer all the kids hung out along the creek and played war with our rubber guns.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Vasa Park roller rink was just the greatest.  I hated to miss a Friday night roller-skating.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Lots of swimming and large picnics would take place in the summer.  Fireman, Alpine Dairy and town picnic.

 

Farming and Dairy

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

My father was Manager of Alpine.  I spent lots of my time there visiting and waiting for dad to get off work.

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Loretta Waters Lewis

Name:Loretta Lewis

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

I did not attend Issaquah High School.  I took the train from Grand Ridge to the 7th and 8th grade in Issaquah.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

She was not my teacher – But Minnie and her mother signed for me to get a drivers license at age of 14, to drive from Grand ridge to Issaquah for groceries – with my grandfather – I could not take the car by myself – (a model T ford.)

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

I lived out of town so my activities were limited.

 

Local businesses

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

My husband owned the Ice Cream Parlor. It was a popular place.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Yes.  Chocolates.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

None

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

My husband was a member of the board for several years.  Cliff bought a lot of gardening supplies there.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

We patronized them.  Mrs. Lawill had me sew for her young daughter.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

Cliff took any job available.  Working in the hayfields for $1.50 a day.  He also piloted a tug boat that towed a raft of logs from the Monahan Mill to the Sammamish Slew.

We didn’t buy anything except staples, flour, sugar etc.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

It took a lot of the Issaquah boys for the service.  Cliff received many letters from them.

 

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

Many men and women worked at Boeings and the shipyards.

 

Outdoor Recreation

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

I roller-skated at Vasa.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

Remember all of them.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

Cliff was a volunteer fire fighter and he fought the fire all day.  This was in June of 1925.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

It has been a source of information for a lot of people.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

We went by bus to Seattle via Renton or drive to Medina and took the ferry to Leschi..

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

The highway divided our property.  Issaquah started to develop after that.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

My first car was a model T Ford that was used only for getting grocerirs and my Grandfather had to ride with me.  I was fourteen at that time.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I am a Past Noble Grand of Gilman Rebekah Lodge #59.  I am a seventy year member.

I am also a past Master of Issaquah Valley Grange.  I have been a member for 45 years.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Many movies and the cost was 10c.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

The Community Church.

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Mary E. Knoernschild Lewis

Name:Mary E. (Knoernschild) Lewis

Birth Date or Year (optional):

11/25/13

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

All my life.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

I liked living near my family.

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

I went from first grade through high school in the old brick building that was torn down.

 

Family History in Issaquah:

My parents moved to Issaquah before I was born.  They owned the property where the Bank of America now stands.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

There weren’t many students in high school at that time, so we knew everyone.

To go to out-of-town games we car pooled so there would be a rooting section.

Besides turning out for sports there were clubs. (Boy’s, Girl’s, French, etc.) We also put on plays and an operetta. Besides having a Junior and Senior Prom we had sock hops.

We had a contest to name the annual and I submitted the winning name – Sammamish – and received many prizes.

Beulah Eades was my algebra and PE teacher and she was my favorite.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Minnie Schomber was my substitute teacher in the fourth grade while Miss Cook was ill.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

No. I graduated in 1931.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I was in the chorus of an operetta when Bill Bergsma had one of the leads. We were dressed like Dutch girls in the chorus. It was “Tulip Time.”

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

We had chores to do but on Friday nights we went to the Issaquah Theatre sometimes. (When we lived in Issaquah.) When we lived in the country we had parties at the different neighbors’ homes on Saturday nights.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

The first store I remember was the Grange Mercantile store. You could buy almost anything there – groceries, gas, kerosene, and food for livestock.

Also went to Fischer’s for meats, Coutts (later Brady’s) for clothing and Cussac’s for shoes.

I also remember going to Schomber’s Bakery and later on Jacobsen’s.

The Grange store and Fischer’s are still there. Coutts’ was on the north side of the present Lewis Hardware and Schomber’s Bakery on the south side. Jacobsen’s bakery was in the Gibson Building on East Sunset across from the hotel.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

When I was going to school I went to Paul Benson’s barbershop after school. Some of the men would be unhappy because they had to wait for a kid to get her hair cut.

After I was married I went to Doris’ Beauty Shop. She did French braids for me.

 

Local businesses

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

I remember when Lewis Hardware was further north. Approximately where the Cascade Bank parking lot is. You could get some kitchen items as well as hardware.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

In the mid-30s I did shop at R&R Grocery. One Thanksgiving I won a live turkey there by coming closest to guessing its actual weight. Wasn’t so much fun when I had to pick and clean it!

Also shopped at Barney White’s grocery that was located in the bottom of the old Odd Fellows Hall.

Later shopped at Tony and Johnnie’s and also Kramer’s Market. I especially remember Ethel Clark (Inger) who would save a couple of packages of Jell-O for my son who couldn’t eat most desserts because he was allergic to wheat. This was during the Second World War while rationing was on.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

We mostly bought food and gasoline when I was young.

Later when I was married we rented a food locker.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

I had my first banana split at Drylie’s Honeysuckle, had luscious pie and chocolate cake at Rena’s and hamburgers at the XXX.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Boehm’s is hard to stay away from.

Rocky Road and chocolate covered nuts are my favorites in the candy line.

Also think their ice cream on a stick is super.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

We bought heating oil from them as well as garden supplies.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

Mr. Lawill was a very quiet man.

They had gift items, candies, etc., besides drugs.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

My father died in 1930 so the only income we had was from selling the milk from one or two cows. My mother had a big garden and a few chickens so we didn’t have to buy eggs.

The money from the milk was used to buy staples like flour, sugar and beans. Mom baked the most wonderful bread. Um um!

We only had two or three dresses to wear to school so we had to keep washing and ironing them to keep clean.

After I graduated in 1931 I started to work. Go $13.20 a week but that certainly made things better.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

Paul Benson Jr.

 

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

Boeing and the shipyards in Seattle and Kirkland employed lots of men and women. My husband worked at Todd’s shipyard.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I remember the queen contests they had at Labor Day. The girl who sold the most tickets got to be queen.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

It just keeps getting bigger and bigger on Salmon Days. The parade route changed so there could be more booths.

 

Outdoor Recreation

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

My son fished in the derbies and won some prizes. In those days the East Fork of the Issaquah Creek had lots of fish.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

We went picnicking and swimming at Alexander’s Beach when I was young. Later I swam at Sunset Park.

I tried ice skating at Horrock’s Farm but wasn’t good at it. Did enjoy the huge bonfires they had though.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

I remember all of them. We went to see the Monohon Mill while it was burning.

We bought alder firewood from Hall’s mill for $2.00 a cord.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

I think it is a wonderful teaching experience for the children as well as adults in the area.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

We went to Seattle via Renton. We shopped for clothing and shoes. Also saw some movies.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

It encouraged development in the area.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

A Ford Model A. Don’t know where it was purchased.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

At one time I belonged to the Issaquah Valley Grange and the Rebekah Lodge.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

My husband belonged to the Sportsmen’s Club. We did target shooting and also went to the turkey shoots.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

Went roller-skating there.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

I went to dinners, lodge meetings and basketball games there.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

I remember when they were on strike and my grandfather not working.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Went to the Friday night movies. One of the serials was “The Perils of Pauline.” It cost 10¢ at that time.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

The Community Baptist Church. Going to Sunday School and being in Christmas programs. They also had a picnic at Alexander’s Beach each year.

I remember Dick Bush always rang the church bell and Charlie Ellis was always taking pictures. Mrs. Tim Evans was a great Sunday School teacher.

Mrs. Edith Dahlby was one of my favorite pastors. She was not only a pastor but a friend.

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Theodore & Ann Leber

Name: Ralph Theodore “Ted” & Ann Leber

 

Education — Coming of Age

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

Eric and Christie Leber were in Jr. Hi during the 1965 earthquake. Christie remembers that she was in Mr. Orth’s class in Bldg. H above the auditorium. It was a 2 story building and the floor dropped about 3”. The kids got under the desks, but Mr. Orth stood and said, “If they close school, I’m going fishing,” while above his head a big wood beam had come loose from the ceiling and was bouncing up and down. There was also a 3 story red brick bldg that split apart. You could see to the outside. The gym floor was like waves. They had to double shift. Some classes were in the Hi School, and some in gray portables along the road to the Hi School. Kids in a gym class were out on the track when it split apart, leaving large cracks. Chris Shortz, a neighbor, was on the track, and terribly shaken, as were many others.

 

Local Businesses

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

We did our shopping at Tony and Johnny’s. Bill Bergsma and his young son Bill would stack the milk shelves. Ai Garner, known as Squak, was the butcher.

When Cougar Mt. residents wanted to put a road in connecting Cougar Mt. with Issaquah, Tony and Johnny’s gave a generous donation, as well as many Issaquah merchants.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker? 

We rented a frozen food locker for many years. It was behind the butcher shop. To get to our locker you had to use a little step ladder.

 

Issaquah Round-Up– Salmon Days– Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

In the 1950s the residents of Cougar Mt. had a float in the Labor Day Parade. It was a Jeep with a deer driving, and tied onto the hood was one of the residents.

One year a deer wandered in, and joined the parade.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss? 

Across the street from the theater was the Forum Book Store. We would have movies at the theater, then go across the street to the book store to discuss them.

Also, upstairs in the theater we had a “Job Line” where kids could come up and find where there were jobs. There was a clothing bank, and Bob Grey, minister of the Presbyterian Church, had his office up there.

 

Additional Memories

ISSAQUAH MEMORIES: 1948 TO 2000

We started buying our groceries at Tony & Johnny’s as they were the nearest grocery to Cougar Mt. (then called Newcastle Hill – mostly) that sold beer. We had stopped at the Grange Mercantile on our first trip for groceries, but continued to Tony & Johnny’s when we found that the Grange did not sell beer – because we were thirsty & it was hot that July day.

We bought, essentially, all our groceries & meats from Tony & Johnny’s as long as they were in business. Their prices were as good as any in town and their quality was good too.

We especially liked Tony (Walen) as he was very outgoing & friendly. Johnny (Hirko) was much quieter & tended to be in the background. John Hirko’s brother, Joe, was one of the butchers, along with Ai (Squak) Garner. We always felt at ease shopping there.

I worked in downtown Seattle until 1965 and always got my haircuts near my office. I didn’t get haircuts in Issaquah until after 1965.

I don’t remember the name of the 1st barber I went to in Issaquah, but he was a young fellow & had a shop next to Sutter’s Feed Store on the North Side of the Sunset [Highway]. He did a good job, but surprised me when he saturated my hair with water, before he cut it – every time I went in. He insisted they he had been taught to cut hair that way. It seemed to work, at least for him. He decided to return to “Styling School” as he felt there was more money in Styling hair than in giving simple haircuts – that’s the last I saw or heard of him.

The next & final barber I went to was “Gene” (Eugene – AKA “Jean” or “John”) Proulx. A pleasant French-Canadian. Gene is a very competent and efficient barber who spoke little unless spoken to and had an enormous clientele. The only time one could get a haircut without an extended wait was at odd hours, midweek. Even then, I’d often be the 4th or 5th in line – mid-morning Wednesday or Thursday. Any other day you’d be standing for half an hour before you could even get a seat to ease your wait. He never wanted to consider another barber. “Too much hassle.” I was sorry when he decided to retire: I used to drive from our new home in Ellensburg, primarily to have him cut my hair – though I’d manage to include other business in the trip. Not many barbers inspire people to travel 200 plus miles for a haircut.

The atmosphere in Gene’s barber shop was pleasant and relaxed. Quite often there would be a discussion of one subject or another, but not always. Sometimes we’d just sit & read until our turn arrived.

We often purchased hardware items from Tom Lewis, though not every item. The principal items that come to mind are our two Aladdin Lamps, which were used during the frequent power failures in stormy weather, especially during the 1950s & 60s. The neighbors often commented “How come you’ve still got electricity?” – all we had were the Aladdin Lamps, which are much brighter than ordinary kerosene lamps.

We still have, though no longer in daily use, our old wood stove. This came with the home we bought on Cougar Mountain. Every so often it would be necessary to replace part of the stove pipe. I knew that I could always find the parts required at Lewis Hardware. I still have some “Elbows” that have never been installed; Tom Lewis & I scrounged around in the basement of Lewis Hardware to find them. I figured I’d better get a couple extras if they were that difficult to find. Few people realize there is a basement under Lewis Hardware.

We had a frozen food locker at the Grange Mercantile store for many years as we raised our own beef; we had Joe Dodge haul our animals to the slaughter house, more or less in the area of the present Post Office, where the Fischer brothers, & Ai (Squak) Garner used to butcher the animal & cut and wrap it for our locker. After Tony Walen died and Tony & Johnny’s finally phased out, we switched our grocery & meat purchases to the Grange Mercantile. We found them very pleasant to deal with, too. (By then, we had found an alternate source of beer – which I don’t think they ever sold – Actually that was not necessary as I was involved in helping establish the first premium winery in the State of Washington: Associated Vintners, now known as COLUMBIA WINERY.)

I bought a side-delivery rake from Grange Supply about 1948. I still own the rake though it is no longer in use. We have purchased farm & garden hardware & various animal feeds along with various petroleum products from the Grange Supply for many years, though they were not our original source of these commodities.

When we first moved to the Issaquah area and required farm-type supplies we purchased them from Western Farmers Association, located on Front Street & now partly incorporated into the Darigold plant. They were competitively priced and were easier for us to get to; also a friendly bunch to deal with. We got home delivery of petroleum products: fuel oil, gasoline & lubricants, fencing, feeds, fertilizers, as well as various hardware items.

I remember the Great Depression as a kid, though we didn’t live in Issaquah at the time. My parents lived in Seattle then; I don’t recall any serious deprivation. My dad had started a new business a few years before the depression and, I am sure, experienced some very serious difficulties (a partner in the business embezzled a large sum of money for starters) but he said little about it, in my presence. (I was only 8 years old in 1929.) We came through all right; my dad never lost his business & Mom mentioned that he paid off the mortgage on time.

My mother’s parents lived in Okanogan County in a little town called Riverside. They had a couple orchards & other property. Mother would take my two brothers & I to visit often, sometimes spending all summer at grandma’s house. My grandfather had serious heart trouble and was often in the hospital; finally dying in about 1932. I do remember grandmother’s concern for him & the finances concerning the care of the orchards. She was a really capable lady and managed somehow.

One of our acquaintances in Riverside was a family of 10 who had a monthly “relief” check from the State of $10!!! Even I could understand they didn’t have much to go on. They lived in a house with 1 bed, a couple of plain kitchen-type chairs, a small table. Nothing visible in the way of food or extra clothing. Their only toilet was an outhouse. No bathroom, no refrigerator, no coverings on the wood floor. I don’t recall seeing any blankets on the bed, either. I’d often see one or the other of the family wearing clothes that looked awfully familiar. My mom & grandmother gave away many of our clothes that “we didn’t need.” The kids seemed to be nice & we often played with them. They never complained.

I was in college by the time WWII started. A number of my friends volunteered for the Mountain Troops & urged me to join them. I didn’t want to spend the war in an igloo & packing everything I owned on my back wherever I went so I decided not to join them in the Mountain Troops, but volunteered for the Army Air Corps instead. I was lucky; became a flight instructor & never left the USA, whereas all my Mountain Troop friends had a much tougher time, in the Aleutian Islands & in Italy.

The Labor Day Parades were a lot of fun. We tried to attend as often as possible. Some of our older children were involved, too. That added to our interest. One thing was of special interest to me; a tame deer had adopted some Issaquah residents as family & used to wander along the parade, mingling with participants and onlookers alike. I thought [that] particularly amazing. I petted her several times. Unfortunately some dogs killed her later. I had some movies of her – which I loaned to a neighbor – his house burned down before they were returned.

 

No comments about Rodeo; we never attended – too rough on man & beast, for us.

 

We attended the Community Baptist Church, which used to be on Rainier Blvd., just across from the Darigold Plant & the Grange Mercantile. In the mid-’60s it became overcrowded & we decided to build a larger structure on Mountain Park Blvd., up the hill west of the Fish Hatchery. Our finances, as always, were limited, so we decided to build, mostly, with volunteer labor from the congregation. One man, Bill Cox, was hired to supervise. That was a wise choice as Bill was an outstanding Superintendent. Everyone respected his abilities & his confident, relaxed approach to the project. It was great fun, though sometimes a little uncomfortable when it was raining or snowing & we had to wade around in the mud – almost to the tops of our boots. I remember, more than once, having to stop to reach down & pull my boot out of the mud with my hands – or it would have come off! When we finished, it gave each of us a strong sense of Truly Belonging. Something to be proud of. Perhaps, the biggest volunteer effort in Issaquah History, at least to that time.

 

The effort was not confined to the guys alone, but was joined, wholeheartedly, by the gals. They not only did the kitchen/lunch bit, but many were often right there alongside us, swinging a hammer, or whatever was required. And those tasty lunches were sure welcome after 4 hours shoveling in the mud with the rain or snow pummeling you.

 

Een members of the community came by to watch & often helped, loaned or gave us equipment. I still have a hard hat given to me by the band leader of the Seattle World’s Fair. (can’t think of his name though)

 

Meindert Pillie, who lives in Providence Point, has some superb movies of the building of the church. I believe the church is now known as the Community Church at 205 Mountain Park Blvd., across from the Catholic Church, our helpful neighbors.

 

Our pastor, at the time of our church construction, was Russell Hendrickson. He and his wife, Marty, also the organist, were lovely people and very inspirational to us all. Russ was a big influence in achieving our goal, often helping at the building site, in addition to his inspirational leadership. One other outstanding pastor was Dick Birdsall; a very positive influence for that church &, I am sure, the community at large.

 

My wife, Ann, & I were very much involved, especially in the early years of hiking with Harvey Manning, on what Harvey called the “Issaquah Alps.” We’ve been over every trail I know of on Tiger, Squak & Cougar Mt. as well as Rattlesnake Ridge near North Bend. I used to run to the Clay Pit on Cougar Mt., from our house; every morning a different way; & at least 5 miles. Ann was a hike leader for the ISSAQUAH ALPS TRAILS CLUB for many years.

 

The nearest I came to Pickering Farm was the Issaquah Airport, next door. I flew in and out of the airport on several occasions while instructing students from the Bellevue Field just up the road towards Seattle – at what is now Eastgate. The way I first located our eventual property on Cougar Mt. was from the air. I had an advanced student who was working on his Commercial Pilot License, with whom I felt relaxed. One day we were practicing Cross-Country flying and passed over Cougar Mt. at a fairly low altitude. I wondered what kind of a view would be possible and turned around to look out towards the rear of the plane. I was impressed & asked, up return, how to get up on “That hill over there.” No one knew. Next weekend my wife & I went looking for a way up “That hill.” Drove up two ruts between massive stumps through what is now Eastgate, to a blacktop road now known as Newport Way. Eventually we wound up the hill to a point where the view opened up & started asking about property for sale. Found the place we lived in for the next 52 years & raised 5 wonderful kids. (The “baby” is now almost 41.)

 

I never worked for Alpine Dairy but we used to drink Skim Milk long before it was available at groceries. We bought a 3 gallon milk can and would take it to Alpine Dairy about once a week to get it filled. I’d have to go into the plant myself and draw the milk from a designated tank, then return to the office and pay the gal behind the desk or Hans Forster the $1.00 I owned them for the 3 gallons. Some difference now!!

 

I worked in Seattle from the time we moved to Cougar Mt. until 1965, when our company moved to Tukwila, & there until I retired. When we first moved to Cougar Mt. our address was Route 2, Box 291, RENTON. Most of our neighbors worked in Seattle & most shopped in Issaquah as it was harder to get to Renton than to Issaquah. Bellevue, in those days, was little more than a gas station and a few stores on Main Street and was quite difficult to access from Cougar Mt., among other problems was a long & twisty bridge across the Factoria area swamp. Besides, there wasn’t anything of much interest when you did get there. That changed a bit over the years. At any rate, we petitioned to have our address changed to Issaquah, where we felt more at home. That remained for the entire time we lived on Cougar Mt., though a large number of our neighbors, recently, petitioned to annex to Bellevue & change their addresses to Bellevue. We think that is kind of sad.

 

The Lake Washington Floating Bridge, originally, was a TOLL BRIDGE. The commuter fare was $8 a month or $96 a year. I was glad they had a toll on the bridge as it helped keep the multitude at bay. I used to get to work in Downtown Seattle in 20 MINUTES, including a stop at the toll booth & the return trip was just as quick. I felt in my heart that things were going to change when the bridge was paid for. And indeed things DID CHANGE!! I could detect an increase in traffic within a week. Traffic seemed to double almost every week!! I hoped, in vain, they’d put that toll back on. Now look at it!!

Gerald Lider

Name:Gerald L. Lider

Gerald Lider during his time at Maywood Junior High.

Gerald Lider during his time at Maywood Junior High.

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

Issaquah was my first teaching assignment in 1948.  I taught grade 7 in the old Issaquah Elementary  School where Clifford Johnson was the principal.  Issaquah Superintendent Mykland signed my first contract although Dr. Ed. K. Erickson became the superintendent of the school district beginning the fall of 1948.  My first teaching contract paid $2,900.00 annually plus $300.00 for bus driving.

In 1948 there were fewer than 40 certified employees in the whole Issaquah District.

I subsequently taught and coached at Issaquah High School from 1949-1956, teaching a variety of subjects which was essential in a small high school.

In 1950 I enrolled in a driver training course at the University of Washington.  It was taught by Amos E Neyhart, “the Father of Driver Education”.  That fall I initiated and taught driver education and behind the wheel instruction for several years including evening and adult classes.  This program was made possible through the co-operation of the American Automobile Association, the Issaquah School District 411 and Stonebridge Chevrolet.  Stonebridge Chevrolet provided a dual-controlled vehicle for the driver training program in 1949.  The school paid all maintenance and operating expenses (including gas and oil) and also paid for the insurance costs.

In 1956 I was elected to be the first principal of Sunset Elementary School where I remained until 1966.  Sunset was opened in the fall of 1959 and served the district for 29 years before it was demolished in 1988 and replaced by a new facility.  The principal with 12 teachers welcomed 314 students the first fall.

The first Sunset PTA comprised:  Mrs. J. J. Millegan, president; Mrs. Eugene Kilby, vice-president: Mrs. G. Haldeman, secretary: Mrs. J. Loveridge, treasurer.

While awaiting the opening of Sunset I taught (grade 6) at May Valley Elementary as did the rest of our Sunset faculty.  Then for a period of time I had my class in the old shop building alongside the old Issaquah Elementary School.  While there I drove a school bus to pick-up and deliver my students.  It was truly a “one room school house.”  The shop was so old it had [many] ceiling leaks so we used about eight coffee cans to catch the rain when it poured through the ceiling.

Following the Sunset experience, I  became the planning principal for the new Maywood Junior High School.  In 1966-67 Maywood students “double-shifted” at Issaquah Junior High while awaiting completion of Maywood Junior High School.  Stan Carnahan was the Maywood Junior High School principal from 1966-77.  I retired from the Maywood Junior High School principalship and the Issaquah School District in August 1977.

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

We chose to live here because my wife, Milly, and I liked the small town atmosphere of Issaquah with the mountains, lakes and Seattle nearby.  (One hour from sea level to ski level.)

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

We raised our three children here (Wendy, Eric and Kirk) and liked the school district so well that all three began their education in the Issaquah schools and graduated for Issaquah High School.  Two became school teachers.

 

Education—Coming of Age

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

1949. I taught a class of 39 seventh graders locate din a classroom on the 3rd floor of the old Issaquah Elementary. When the earthquake “hit” we had just dismissed the students to go to lunch, so the third floor had only a few teachers there at the time. We grabbed the stairway hand rails to keep our balance from the sway of the building. One of our students was leaving the building via  a back door when one of the many bricks falling from the chimney hit him in the shoulder, breaking it, I believe

1965: At Sunset Elementary School, we were all on ground level so the effect wasn’t as great as 1949. Everyone was well under control so there were no major incidents, nor accidents, nor damage.

 

 What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I coached the 8th grade basketball team the first couple years in Issaquah and we played games with other elementary schools in the Snoqualmie valley. My later coaching included IHS assistant basketball coach with Frank Ecker, and asst. coach in track with Dan Cyle.

One memorable incident occurred during an IHS varsity basketball fame in the old green gym. In the midst of a game we were beginning to fall behind. One overzealous fan yelled from the bleachers, “Ecker, why don’t you do something?” Coach Ecker stood up, faced this fan and firmly asked, “Now just what would you suggest?” TOUCHE!!

Most notable tall players as this period of time were Jim Brooks and Nick Kelderman (6’7”) who later played basketball at Pacific Lutheran University. This team went to the (NAIA) national finals 2 years in a row under Coach Harshman.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Sometimes the paddle was used in classroom discipline and it usually got to “the seat of the problem”!!

 

Local businesses

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Paul Benson’s Barber shop. He was very disgusted with me when I eventually got a crew cut. With the shorter hair, I didn’t require his services as often as usual!

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

It was the main source of hardware supplies with friendly service. We also purchased fishing licenses there with accompanying FISH STORIES – both ways!

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

We purchased all our groceries at the Grange. We would charge them and pay in full at the end of each month when we were paid.  We also rented a frozen food storage locker in an effort to save money.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

We purchased our heating oil from the Grange Supply. Early in the 50’s they periodically filled a large 50 gallon drum at the rear of our home.

 

World War II

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

Prior to coming to Issaquah, I was a Lt (j.g.) in the Naval Reserve serving aboard landing craft (LCI #2 and LST #907) in both the Mediterranean Theatre of Operations and in the Pacific Theatre (1943-1946). My wife, Milly, was in the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps for the same period of time.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

Enclosed is a Labor Day photo of the Issaquah teacher’s float in 1955 with the caption, “Can our school keep pace with the human race?” It provided a stork as the teacher with an old fashioned teacher’s desk and the old type of student desks with “live” students aboard.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

After the opening of Sunset Elementary School, the landscaping was left for the students, parents and faculty to accomplish. There was no school district money spent, so donations were solicited and we spent many days and weekends in landscape improvement.

 

Outdoor Recreation

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Living next to Vasa Park, we have seen it evolve from smaller group picnics to very large and involved corporation picnics throughout the summer.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

I.H.S. biology field trips to the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery were very educational and convenient, from the old high school especially. It has become a great tourist attraction, for its an exceptional place to visit, especially in the fall.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

Issaquah Valley Dairy.  “The Milk Man”,  Bill Bergsma Sr., was truly “Mr Issaquah”.  He and his fellow workers delivered milk door-to-door throughout the region.  Mr. Bergsma was exceedingly friendly to everyone and was a very positive asset for Issaquah.  Among other things, at Christmas, he would visit schools and individual homes dressed as Santa Claus.  Many believed that he was the “real” Santa who provided lots of fun and excitement for local children year after year.

 

Railroad—Transportation

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

Purchased a new 1948 Chevrolet from Stonebridge Chevrolet and several more of their Chevrolets thereafter.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

Several years after World War II our church purchased the former Japanese Community Center in Bellevue for Grace Lutheran Church services.  (There was no Lutheran church in Issaquah at that time.)

Back to the Memory Books

Lenore Cutsworth Martinell

Name:Lenore Martinell

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

I lived in Issaquah 52 years

Issaquah or area school(s) attended

Issaquah elementary, junior and high school

Family History in Issaquah:

My grandfather, John Allen Bush, was the second white child born in the Issaquah Valley.  He was the son of James and Martha Bush.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

The teachers I most remember are Richard Treat and Gerald Lider.  They were both wonderful teachers and great role models.  I worked for Mr. Treat as his assistant in my senior year (1956).  Mr. Treat taught U.S. Government.  Mr. Lider was my home room teacher in the ninth grade.  Mr. Treat, and his wide, Edith, who taught elementary school, passed away some years ago.  I believe Mr. Lider still resides near Lake Sammamish.

I also remember, then principal, Charles Fallstrom, meting out punishment he thought appropriate.  I witnessed an event at school one morning that would be unthinkable now.  A young man came to school with his pants belted well below his waist.  Mr. Fallstrom walked up behind him and pulled his pants down and then told the kid to pull his pants back up, go home, and not to come back to school until his pants were worn correctly.  Needless to say, the kid came back to school the next day with his pants belted where they should have been in the first place.  Nowadays, Mr. Fallstrom and the school district would have had a lawsuit filed against them.  All the kids thought it was hilarious.

Mr. Fallstrom also had a paddle with holes in it that he administered to the backsides of boys when deemed necessary.  That particular punishment took place down in the boiler room of the high school.

I also remember the day that Robert (Bob) White, a long-time teacher and administrator in the school district, was first introduced to the student body at Issaquah High School.  We girls all swooned.  He was (and still is) a Robert Redford look-a-like.

Mr. Albert Rosenhall was my seventh grade teacher.  After one year in our classroom, he resigned and went in to the undertaking business!  We always thought we must have given him a pretty bad time.  The kids said he must have preferred “dead ones” to “live ones”.

I attended first grade in Issaquah during the 1944-45 school year.  Miss Johnson was my teacher.  There was only one first grade in the district at that time. (picture enclosed)

We also took a field trip to the Issaquah Valley Diary.  I am not sure which grade I was in, but I would guess the third or fourth grade.  Mr. Bergsma gave each of us a small bottle of milk to drink.  (two pictures enclosed).

I don’t remember what the occasion was, but nine of us little girls in grade school were dressed in dresses our mothers made out of crepe paper.  The dresses were each made in a different color. (picture enclosed)

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

My friend and I were out on the field in back of where the Issaquah Middle School now sits when the 1949 earthquake hit.  It was terrifying, and to the best of my memory, we were never allowed back in the building.  It was condemned.

Tommy Bush, Sue Cameron’s brother, was standing beside the brick building with his friend Jerry Hamm, when the earthquake occurred.  Tommy was not injured, but I believe falling bricks broke some of Jerry’s ribs.

After the quake the principal stood on the roof of the small porch off one of the back entryways to the building with a loudspeaker telling us that we could go back in to get our things.  We were then sent home.

I was at home with my children in 1965 when the earthquake occurred.  My eldest son, Don, was on the school bus headed for Sunny Hills Elementary and never felt a thing, although the bus driver thought she was having a heart attack.

I was in the back bedroom of the house and had just put my youngest son, Ted, down on the bed to change his diaper, when the earthquake hit.  My middle son, Kevin, was watching J.P. Patches with Candy Watson, our five year old neighbor girl, in front of the house.  The rolling and shaking was so bad that I could not get from the back bedroom to the front of the house to get Kevin and Candy.  I asked Kevin just this past week if he remembered the earthquake.  He said he did, but the thing he remembered the most was my screaming at both of them to come to me!  So much for remaining calm.  We were without power for quite a number of hours.

 

Education—Coming of Age

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

We spent a lot of our time going to the movies at the old Issaquah Theatre.  A really special treat was to take the bus and go to Seattle to see a movie.  Our youth group at the Community Church was very active and we did lots of fun things together.

I remember vividly upon receiving my first bicycle when I was a young teen that my mother’s one instruction was that I was NOT to ride my bicycle to Issaquah.  We lived down near the state park at the time.  I, and my cousin, Irene Kelderman, decided we would be very careful and we would go anyway.  I proceeded to fall off of my bike, hurt my knee, and eventually wound up with blood poisoning.  I received no punishment from my mother at that time.  Her look told me what she was thinking.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Most of the time we shopped at Kramer’s Market on E. Sunset.  Mr. Kramer was a thoughtful man.  My mother and I had no vehicle, so he would deliver our groceries for us.

After I was married I always shopped at the Grange Mercantile.  I used to shop each Friday morning with my children.  I would get my groceries, take them to the checkout stand, and before the clerk (Joan Karvia) had them all totaled, I would have written out my check for $25.  The change would be my spending money for the week!  The meat department was really neat because you could pick out just what you wanted and the amount you wanted.  Dan Kramer was the butcher.

Tom Drylie (not sure of the spelling) was the proprietor of the store that was located near the old Union Tavern building.  His store also served as the Greyhound Depot.  He was, by reputation, a very frugal man, to put it graciously.  When I was a youngster I went in to buy a pound of jellybeans.  When he weighed the bag it was very slightly over one pound so he took one jelly bean out and cut it in half!

In later years, my husband, Ted, remembers Mrs. Pennington as a marvelous waitress at Fasano’s when it was located on E. Sunset Way.  It was a long and narrow building filled with booths and tables.  Ted says that Mrs. Pennington could take care of the whole place single handedly.

Most of my grandparents’ farming supplies were purchased at the Washington State Co-op which was housed where the Darigold plant is now located.  I have an old quilt that my grandmother made from feed sacks.  On the backing of the quilt is stamped “Washington State Co-op.”

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

My friend, Mary Ann Hemmingsen, and I both got very short haircuts.  They were short in the back and slicked back on the sides.  It was respectfully called a “DA” or duck’s ass!  Many of the boys wore similar hair styles.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Oh, how I loved Boehm’s Candies and still do!  My son, Don, worked for a time in the kitchen learning how to make candy.

My favorite candies?  Rocky road, nougat, and honeycomb

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I can remember how excitedly we used to look forward to the Labor Day celebration.  Many times we had to stand under umbrellas in pouring rain and we still got soaking wet.  It was a time to see folks that one hadn’t seen for a while and to just enjoy the day.  I know the celebration went on for many years, but I do not know how long.

Issaquah Community Church used to build a float for the parade each year and we kids would ride on it in our white junior choir robes, complete with the red bows, and throw Bible tracts and candy to the folks along the parade route (picture enclosed) I believe this picture would have been taken sometime during the late 1940s and early 1950s.

 

Outdoor Recreation

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

We played and fished in the Issaquah Creek.  There were large eels that inhabited the water under the bridge on what is now Gilman Blvd just west of the new Post Office.  We would go wading in the summertime and the eels would swim along our feet.  It was scary to me, at least, but I always seemed to go back for more.

I don’t remember ever catching any fish in the creek; however, I do remember that we, in our ignorance, threw rocks at the fish going upstream to spawn.  We called them redfish.  Nowadays, we would be sitting in jail, but in those days we really didn’t know any better.  I don’t think we killed any fish, but I do believe we gave a few of them headaches.

Alexander’s Beach on Lake Sammamish was our favorite place to go swimming.  As a kid, I spend many a wonderful hour there swimming and ruining my skin in the sun.  When I had children, I took them there, too.  It was such a nice place.

 

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

My father, Dale Cutsforth, was a chicken farmer during the 1930’s.  He built, almost single handedly, a high block-long, 3-story chicken house, complete with an elevator along what is now 221st Pl. SE.   The building housed thousands upon thousands of chickens over the years.  Unfortunately, I was not too interested in it and didn’t appreciate it like I should have.  It was torn down in the 1970’s.  It was an imposing structure and should be part of Issaquah’s memories.  (picture enclosed)  The picture of me looking at the calf in front of the chicken house shows what a huge structure this was.  The picture was taken around 1940.  The other picture was taken in 1937 when the chicken house was newly built.

Please note:  I have written Sue Cameron and asked her to provide any pictures that she has.  I’ve also asked Paul Turcotte to submit to you any memories about the structure that he may have.  He worked there after my father sold the property to Earl and Dorothy Miller.

Both my great-grandfather, James Bush, and my grandfather, John Bush, were farmers in the valley.  My grandfather’s home and farm were located on the property where the new post office was built on Gilman Blvd.  (picture enclosed)

Most of my grandparents and parents farming supplies were purchased from the Washington State Co-op which was housed in a building where Darigold plant is now located.  I have a quilt that my grandmother made from old feed sacks.  Stamped on the backing of the quilt is “Washington State Co-op”.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

My mother and I always attended Community Church which was located down on Rainier Blvd. and is now an office building.  I was baptized there in 1949 and I played the piano for church there while I was in high school.  My husband and I were married there in 1957 by Pastor Bob Larsen.

I have many wonderful memories of the church and its influence on my life.  Rev. Albert Dahlby and his wife, Edith, came to the church as our leaders, I believe during the late 40s or early 50s.  Unfortunately, Mr. Dahlby was stricken with Parkinson’s Disease and could not lead the congregation.  Mrs. Dahlby took over the reins and kept church going with her ever-present courage and commitment.  Their daughter, Grace, still lives in the Issaquah area.

Pastor Larsen was our pastor during the 1950’s.  He was a very intelligent and was very straight forth.  I will never forget the time when a woman kept bringing herself and her baby to church each Sunday.  Our church had a lovely nursery where the moms could sit and watch and also hear the service, but this lady chose not to take advantage of what was offered.  Unfortunately, the baby cried during most of the services disturbing those who were there to worship.  One Sunday, Pastor Larsen came to the end of his patience, stopped his sermon, looked down t the woman and said “Madam, crying babies are like New Year’s resolutions; they should be carried out.”

There was also a time when a transient took up residence in the attic of the church and was there for quite a period of time until the day he carefully pulled back one of the ceiling panels to peer down into the church sanctuary to see what the kids were doing and was noticed by one of the kids.  He was promptly removed.

The Rev. Russell Hendrickson and his wife, Marty, were also wonderful leaders of the church.  The parsonage was located adjacent to the church which had a tall hedge in front.  The Hendricksons had come from Wenatchee.  One morning Pastor Hendrickson was walking over to the church past the hedge when he said he heard a rattlesnake rattle.  It scared him and he called the police who gingerly investigated.  No rattlesnake was ever found, but Pastor Hendrickson always said he was from Wenatchee and he knew what a rattlesnake sounded like!  We later heard that a rattlesnake had been found in a bale of hay that was being unloaded across the street at the Washington State Co-op.

The long-time custodian at Issaquah High School was Martin Hansen.  He and his wife, Florence, held Bible School during the summer months for any kids who wanted to attend.  He had a little old bus that we fondly nicknamed the “chicken coop”.  Martin would pick us up in the morning, deliver us to High Point for Bible School and then return us home again in the afternoon.  He surely deserves some recognition in our memories of Issaquah.

 

Additional Memories

My grandfather’s (John Bush) home was located directly behind what is now Gilman Station.  In the late 1940’s he sold a portion of his property along Highway 10 to folks who built the Mar Si Motel.

Grandpa used to have to walk all the way across Highway 10 and over Juniper Street to pick up his mail each day.  When the motel was being built, the owners kindly provided a large corridor between the two sections of motel buildings just for grandpa to walk through on his way to the mailbox.  Otherwise, he would have no way to get through.  I never fail to think of that as I drive by.  The buildings have changed, but I can still see grandpa with his cane walking through there to pick up his mail.

Grandpa and grandma (Ida) celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in the old house.  Grandpa lived another couple of years and passed away in 1952.  Grandma lived another year and passed away in 1963.  They were married a grand total of 62 years! (picture enclosed)

I think Dr. Dana Hillery should also be remembered in the memories of Issaquah.  He faithfully worked among us for so many years.  He was my grandparents’ doctor, took care of my mother when she was pregnant with me and arranged for her to have a Cesarean section in Seattle when my mother was way overdue and showed no signs of delivering.  Dr. Hillery was also took care of me and my children.

Clint Brady operated a clothing store on E. Sunset Way for many years and then moved his establishment to the building that now houses Domino’s Pizza.  His son, John, operated the store in that location for many years.

I would also like to have my dear cousin, Beryl Baxter, remembered.  She was a wonderfully sweet lady who lived her entire life in the valley and passed away two years ago at the age of 87.  She was a talented quilter and earned the nickname “The Quilt Lady.”  She had articles written about her both in the Journal American and The Issaquah Press.

 

*****

 

Dear Issaquah Historical Society,

I sent in my “Memories of Issaquah” booklet last week.  Yesterday, I received additional information from Paul Turcotte, who has specific memories of the huge chicken house that my father built in the 1930’s in Issaquah.

Would you please include the following information with my booklet:

 

“The chicken house was built before World War II, and was an imposing structure standing four stories tall with a length of around 150 feet.  It was all the more impressive when you consider that its construction was entirely the effort of one man, Dale Cutsforth.”

“It had several ingenious labor-saving features, such as electrically operated elevators for carrying the heavy feed sacks, cleated ramps that took you from floor to floor, removable windows for ventilation control, chutes going from the first floor all the way to the attic area for the movement of wood chip little and for transferring birds from floor to floor, an old Model “B” Ford engine driving a blower for blowing the wood chips into the attic area just under the roof, all this from the mind and effort of Dale Cutsforth, who must have been a dynamo of sorts in his own right.”

“Dale sold the property to Earl and Dorothy Miller who, during the late 40s to the mid 50s, raised 12,000 fryers twice a year for the Seattle market.  All the chickens were housed in the one building.”

“Sadly, sometime during the 1970s the building collapsed of its own weight and years of disuse.”

Back to the Memory Books

Urban Massett

Name: Urban Masset

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

All my life except for time in the military and off to college.

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

I was born here.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

????That is a good question????  It was a nice little town but now it is just becoming another jungle like Los Angeles.

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Started in kindergarten in the old library where the police station now stands and graduated in the old high school where now the swimming pool now stands.

 

Family History in Issaquah:

My family, father, uncles, grandparents, etc. came here in the early 1900’s.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

Memories of Issaquah High School were of what is know today as small hick town type living.  We had like 200 people in the school and every one knew everyone else.  It was good times as most everyone was in the same shape.  We did not have the what is called today’s rich and not poor but working class.  We had some very good teachers I think one of the best was Richard Treat.  You could try and get away with things but he always seemed to know what you were thinking.  He was more than a fair teacher.  If you did make a mistake he would let you go back and find out what you did and then of course you had to do twice the work to make it up.  I can speak of this, as I know I outlined every history book that they had in Issaquah High School, and then some.  Mr. Treat’s fair play made me want to become a History teacher (which I never did) but still would like to be.  Through his leadership I still enjoy and read a lot about history.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Minnie Schomber was a teacher long before most of us went to school.  Her husband, Jake, was the janitor at the old three story schoolhouse where most of us started out.  Minnie lived just up the block from me and was the bookkeeper, etc. for the B&R coal company and kept them out of trouble with the IRS after the previous bookkeeper almost sunk them.  She was one sharp business lady and could figure out most anything in our day and age.  Too bad she never went into politics.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

In the 1949 earthquake we were in school at the old three story red school and the chimney came down so we were dismissed for the rest of the day and some of us walked down to see what damage had been done and of being it was April and a nice warm day ended up down at Lake Sammamish at the east end at the old coal bar down where I-90 now hits the lake.  There were cracks down there in the bar that were sunk down 3 feet and some over 18 inches wide and we could not see the bottom.

The 1965 quake I was living up on Pine Lake and happen to be fishing out on the dock at the time it hit.  The lake started quivering and the fish started biting like I never seen them do before.  I did not realize we were having an earthquake until I looked around back up at the house to see it doing the boggie-woggie.  My wife was yelling and I said hold on the fish are biting so she wrecked my day then by having me come up to the house where there was nothing done to it but then went down to Issaquah and seen all the damage down to the town.  They then torn down the old high school as they said it was unsafe.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

Turned out one year for sports but was not fast or big enough back then so went into choir and band.  We would go to different events at other schools for contests on the different bands and choirs seeing who could do what.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Most of us that lived here in town, Issaquah, well, we did a lot of fishing, and hunting sometimes during season and sometimes not.  Most of us worked in the farms around here in the summers like Pickering Farms and Risdons greenhouses.  There was always plenty to do.  We did not have all these organized things that they have today, we just invented our own things.  There was one play field and I do not think it was used that much except for high school football games.  We generally if we played baseball well just did it in the streets.  Of course there were few cars etc. then and Issaquah had a population of 812.

How were we punished if we did wrong in school, well we knew that there was a big paddle in the principals office and if you did wrong well you would get it so really as I recall no one ever got sent to the office as the fear of just knowing it was there made you think twice.  Now in grade school, well the teacher would just wack you with a yardstick or a ruler and that was the guiding light.  Once with that and after that you were a good little girl or boy.  Plus you were so hurt by getting smacked in front of your classmates we did not do the things that we would get caught at.  I think we were more smarter then some or most of the kids today.  As you might say some of us wrote the book and could spot what the kids today are thinking as we did it to long ago.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Being I grew up in this town I remember all the businesses.  You bought your groceries at the Red and White or Tony’s and Johnnie’s or the Grange Mercantile.  Of course there was Mosher’s Market new to the still Fischer’s Meat Market.  You had the old Triple XXX up on Sunset way and the Busy Bee Café and, of course, Nicks.  Your furniture was from Thomas’s, which was next to the old Issaquah Bank, which housed the post office behind it.  Then when Tony’s moved to their new building we had Franks Pool Hall that was a big treat to go and play pool but in the back room was big time gambling going on which we only heard about.  Lumber of course was from Johnson’s Lumber, which Hec LaChance bought out.  If you wanted a new car we had Hepler’s Ford Motor.  For a Chev you went to Fink Motor Company and, of course, after the war we had the Kaiser Frazer down in Frog Town.  But what a lot do not remember was on the corner of Sunset and Front Street was, I think it was, Fritz’s Hudson, Packard, and Studebaker Auto Agency.  It shut down in 1948.  Now for shoes we had good old Cussac’s.  If it didn’t fit it did the next day.  His store was next to what is still the Peters Agency that is where you got your insurance and they did your income tax and if you sold your house or it was sold they handled everything from selling to getting you a new one.  I can remember so much but would need a secretary to write it all down.  Of course, cannot forget old Bradey’s Clothing.  No matter what you needed if he didn’t have it I guess it did not exist:  And if he didn’t have your size he would have it the next day.  Of course, a few of us remember when we had more taverns then we had churches.  Must have been at least ten taverns and bars and two churches.  But all were full.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

We had two barbershops in town and they were Lesis’s and Paul Benso.  They used to be across the street from one another.  After the war another one opened in the H & H Saloon with a separate door.  So you could have a cool one while you waited.  It used to be just a plain hair cut and then in the summer time you got a pig shave so it would last thru the summer.

Socializing was mainly done in the restaurants over a cup of coffee or if you weren’t big enough a coke at say Drylie’s Honeysuckle.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Lewis’s Hardware is like an ICON in Issaquah.  They had everything that you ever needed.  As I remember way back when you’d go in there when you were in the middle of a job and get what you needed and then paid for it after the job was over.  I think about everyone and other businesses had an account there.  They carried everything from plumbing to all you hunting needs.  I remember buying my first rifle there.  Now don’t forget old Andy Wold.  He had quite a selection of stuff too.  So if you did not get it at one store well you would just wander down the street to the other one.  As back then only businesses had telephones.  Well you’d walk from one place to the other or they would call for you to see if they had it.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Back then you would buy your groceries about every couple of days as stuff did not have all the preservatives on them so you would just seem to be to the store that was closest to you which I guess was the old Red and white, which became Kramer’s market and that is where you bought your stuff for the time needed.  You knew all the clerks as you lived by them.  They all had the same items and they all ended up, except Tony’s and Johnnie’s, having cold storage lockers in their basements.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

Being members of the Grange for years we did purchase a lot of food items from the grange and when we butchered we would take it down to the Grange and they would hang the beef for the required time and then cut and wrap it for you.  Then you, back then, always had a locker at the grange to keep your meats and frozen goods in.  So, as I lived on the other side of town, would get on my bike and go down to the Grange and get stuff out of the locker.  The question would be what were you not able to buy at the Grange in the way of food items.  When you canned in the fall you’d take all that down to your locker and you bought a lot of your canning goods from the Grange to put up stuff for the winter.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

I guess the old Triple XXX was about the best place to go.  The burgers and fries were always the favorite.  If you were at the other end of town, well you about went into any of the places, as they were all good.  Rena’s I do not remember.  Just the Busy Bee, Nick’s Triple XXX, the Sky Ranch and one other small one where it’s now the Chevron Gas Station down on the corner of Front and Gilman.  Back in my days it was the owners that ran the cafés etc. except Nick’s would have help on Friday and Saturday nights.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

We used to go to Boehm’s quite a bit as both my daughters worked there after school.  And the oldest one got married in the chapel that he built.  My favorite candy there, of course, was the chocolate covered cherries.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

Well they would kick us out of the bars as to our age.  But when we did get to that age of going into the bars we were mostly in the military.  So when we would come home on leave we would probably go into one for a beer that we would see some we knew in there.

When we were young we used to see this sign that said NO MINORS ALLOWED BUT YET WE WOULD SEE ALL THE COAL MINERS GOING IN AFTER WORK.  I guess that had a lot of us wondering in our younger days as to the spelling.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

How well I remember the Grange Supply as I used to have to cross the old I-90 there with the tractor to fill it up there with gas when I worked for both Dan and Old Man Risdon.  It was a real farmers store as all the farmers from all around used to gather there and tell about that they were selling more products then the other guy.  All, of course, wore those old bib overhauls.  It was the farmers gathering place back then.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

I recall that Lawill’s was the only drug store in Issaquah for many years as Stevenson had other irons in the fire so old Lou had complete if you need anything.  He operated it for many years with just himself and his wife part-time and then they hired, I think her name was Hansen, to work for them.  She was a real lady.  Her husband was an Air force pilot that got shot down in World War II.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

I really don’t know of anything that was done by local elected officials.  It seemed like it was a way to get your name in the newspaper, the old Issaquah Press or was it the Independent?  It was, it looks like, an excuse to have a night out and then a few beers afterwards.  And maybe get paid a buck or two for attending a meeting.

Well I think the earlier bunch kept the town nice and small and a nice livable place to be.

 

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

Did you know Mayor Alexander, she was a looker I was told.  Political activities that drew attention?  Well, on that one we won’t mention names but when Mountain Park was put in outside the county and then the city went in and took it over and had to use the money from the street funds in downtown Issaquah well there was a lot of wondering among the old-timers that wanted to know who got paid off on the city taking over housing that was built over mine shafts and air vents??????  I think I know from what I heard years ago when I delivered the Seattle times to a certain lawyer’s office in Issaquah back then and heard the four that made dollars off of it talking.  None are alive today to say that it is not true today though.

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

Heck, I don’t think anyone gives a darn as there was no mail delivery back then and it was all post office box and if you needed to know where someone lived just ask anyone on the street.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

Being I was not born yet all I heard was stories from my uncles etc.  You worked any job you could get and you raised big gardens.  Money, well, everyone did trading back then for this and that.  I guess some of them used script.  And you would trade that for other things that you needed.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

World War II effect on Issaquah:  It brought in a few more jobs to the town but it did bring it a few more people as they came from the dust bowl states to work for Boeing and the shipyards, but we were still a ways out for commuting so our little town really had not much effect except you could not get new cars and rationing.  Being Issaquah was such a small town we knew all the boys that went into the service and knew all that were killed there too.  The city still has a plaque with all the names of those killed in action.  I was in grade school during the time of the Second World War.

 

How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah?  Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?

To my knowledge Issaquah was not affected by the Japanese Internment Camps.  We did have a spotter shed on top of the old fire hall that people took turns up there a few hours a day watching for Japanese aircraft as they thought the coast here might be bombed.

 

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

The job market was increased somewhat in Issaquah with the coal mines working double shifts to supply the power to the plants in Seattle and Renton which brought in more people to live in the area.  The area that got most closest to Issaquah is Coalfield as it was close to Renton Boeing.  Lumbering, of course, increased with the demand for housing for the workers coming into this area needing housing.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

The Labor Day Celebration used to be a big highlight of the end of summer and the beginning of the school year.  The Labor Day Celebration here in Issaquah used to be bigger then the Ellensburg Labor Day Celebration.  The big parade on Labor Day used to bring floats, bands, marching groups, etc. from around the whole Seattle area.  It used to last for hours and then there was the judging at the old firemen’s’ field.

There was so much stuff going on with the rodeo, carnival, games, football game and just about everything else that you could ever want.  And then that evening when the kids were all tired out they would have a big dance at the big old Firemen’s Hall.  Of course, when World War II came along this was all stopped until 1946 when the war was over.  They used to have a big drawing and of course the first prize was a new car.  Either a Chev or Ford.

When they went to Salmon Days well I consider that the end of the good old Issaquah days.  Once it went to this so called Salmon Days it became nothing but a giant arts and craft show where people brought all their junk to sell.  To me it was the end of Issaquah and the good old fun days.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

I believe 1967 was the last big Labor Day of any size that they had as I was in the Issaquah J C’s that year and we took it on and did we have a ball.  I somehow got stuck with being one of the chairmen on it, and knowing nothing about running something like that.  Well some of the good old boys got in there and we had a hell of a last Labor Day that Issaquah had.  We didn’t have any car to give away that year but had a big screen TV and lots of other things to do.  I believe that Lorraine Swanson was our queen that year and we had our float in all the going-ons around here.  Driving it in to Seattle was a real thrill and a half.  With old Chuck Sapp, Art Burt, Bob Burt, Nels Johnson to name a few, we had a real bang up Labor Day like I don’t think that you will ever see again in Issaquah.  It’s in the history book now.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

What activities were there not at Labor Day?  Penny digs for the little kids, sack races, egg throws, just about anything you want to name and the Issaquah Labor Day had it.

Salmon Days, well you get to go and watch a small parade and walk up and down the street and buy stuff that you will throw away afterwards.  You do get to go over and eat some old salmon and other junk foods.  Salmon Days are nothing I would, and others that have lived around here, would not waste out times going down and look at junk stalls.

 

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

The Rodeo’s ended back before World War II came along.  The area was not big enough for all the people that came out to Issaquah to see all the stuff and to hold the Rodeo too.  We just ran out of space and then Ellensburg was getting bigger too, which had more money for prizes than Issaquah had.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

Issaquah had lots of things going.  There were always dances going on at the Firemen’s Hall.  And then if not you had old Goode’s Corner where the Issaquah’s Park and Ride now sits.  We used to have big shoots up at the Issaquah Sportsman Club, where there was a lot, I guess you’d call it small time gambling as you’d put your 25 cents and get three paddles to win a turkey if you didn’t do trap shooting and long range shooting.  The small lakes around here used to freeze over for maybe up to two months during the winter and you could go sliding or ice skating and of course we used to get at least two weeks of snow where you could go skiing down the hills at the old high school.  Then of course there was the good fishing in the creeks and lakes around Issaquah along with the excellent duck hunting down in the valley in the fall.  At Christmas time there was always all the lodges that had Christmas parties, such as the Grange and other places.  It seemed there was always more then enough to do what ever you wanted.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

I think that most everyone spent a lot of time outside doing fishing, hunting, etc. around here.  One of the favorite hiking trails that is still somewhat in use is where you would take off from where the high school is at now and go up along side the hill up to the power line and then follow that over to Round Lake and then from there over to Lake Tradition and then back down the other power line and down the hill past the old railroad trestle and then back down to town.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

In Issaquah Creek we caught trout.  Up in Tradition we caught sunfish.  Up in Pine Lake it was trout, sunfish, some bass and a few perch.  Lake Sammamish was the big fishing lake as they had most everything in there, in the fall you could fish off the mouth of the big creek and catch salmon.  That was a thrill if you ever landed them as most of us had just little trout poles.  I caught a summer run steelhead in Issaquah Creek in, I think it was 1947, that was over 30 inches long.

Fishing derby we never even heard of those things back in my days.  Yes, our method of fishing and hunting were all together different back then.  Today you cannot discharge a gun except in a designated area, which there is none close around here.  All the creeks are closed to fishing here in the Issaquah area.  EVERY YEAR WE LOSE MORE AND MORE OF OUR FREEDOMS.  Too much government is the trouble.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Memories of Vasa Park were always good.  They used to have roller-skating there on Sundays as on Saturday nights.  They would have dances, etc. there.  Sometimes on Friday they would have roller-skating if there were no other events scheduled.  Some of us used to walk from Issaquah to there to go skating on Sunday afternoons.

Then of course in the summer time they had big picnic’s there and if you were a member of a lodge that had it that weekend well then you got to go:  If not well, there were so many places to go swimming that you just took your choice.  If you did not feel like walking to the lake you could go up to the dam and float down the fish ladder.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Went swimming in all the local lakes in the summer, you name it and some of them are grown over now that we used to go swimming in.

Horrock’s Farm was a little too far to walk so we just ice skated down at the fish hatchery pond and other closer ponds.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

I well remember all the mills.  Used to go up with my father and pick up lumber at all the different mills for the coal mines where he was the maintenance man for them.  He used to have to go and get new lumber all the time for the building of new bunkers for the coal to be held in till the trucks would come and haul it away.  Also the bunkers would need maintaining and new coal cars had to be built so I would go up with him and help load the cut lumber on the truck to be hauled back to the mines.  I used to walk all thru these mills when they were running at max operation and watch the different aspects of the logs being made into the desired pieces of lumber that we desired.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

We were living right above the Monohon Mill the last time it burned in I think it was about 1972.  We woke up in the middle of the night and the inside of our house was like being in full sun light.  I walked out on the deck and took pictures of it but now after all these years will have to try and find them as moved twice since back then.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

The salmon hatchery and Issaquah at one time this was probably the largest hatchery in the Pacific Northwest.  The salmon were so thick coming up it that you could walk across the creek on their backs.  It never really employed too many people, maybe up to ten during the salmon running season, but it brought a lot of people out to see all the fish.  But this was just during the fish running season.  After that, well when the eggs were being hatched, you would find a few people coming there but no big crowds.  The area where they now hold the fish for getting the eggs was mainly used for people having picnics in the summer and of course for people making out in the middle of the night:  Kind of a lover’s lane.

Now it is used to still gather eggs from the salmon and there seems to be a lot more people.  Of course we are a growing area and there are more people coming to see if there is any fish out there for them to see along with the schools now making field trips from I see as far as Seattle bring kids out here to see what the fish start out like.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

Well I considered that I was involved in farming when having worked on farms while I was in high school etc.  I worked on Risdon’s farm, which is now some of the Triple XXX.  It used to have green houses on it and we grew cucumbers, lilies, tomatoes and other things like outside was mainly strawberries and some type of beans.

Also worked on Jack Lane’s dairy farm; there it was help with the milk and of course clean up the barn after milking.  That was the smelly job, wheeling the wheelbarrows full of manure out to the big pile.

 

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

The Pickering Farm was right next to the Lane Farm and would see some of my class mates working there but mainly during hay season when they would be getting in the grass or whatever you wanted to call it for the coming winter.  The Pickering boys mainly took care of it during the winter, as there was quite a bunch of them.

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

No I did not but my father did after he retired from the coalmines.  He worked there for three years till he turned 65 as the coalmines were dying and only working two or three days a week so he went to work for Han Foster at the then called creamery.  Doing maintenance work on the machinery and running some machine.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

Well we did not go to Seattle that much till after the floating bridge was build.  Before that you would have to drive down around Renton and then over Dunlap Canyon, then down thru Allentown and then over on to what is now East Marginal Way.  It was a days journey to go to Seattle and back.  But then when the floating bridge opened up well we would ride the Trailhound bus into Seattle a few times a year to look at the Christmas displays, etc. and do some shopping.  A big thrill was when the Bon Marché in Seattle put in the first escalator, boy that was big time for us country boys out here.

I guess we did in Seattle what most country boys did, look around at all the things that were offered for sale go down to the public market and look around and sometimes go to a big movie house and of course the penny arcade down on first and then look at all the hock shops and then end up down at Marshall’s looking at all the camping gear and stuff that none of us could ever afford but dreamed about.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

Bought my first car when I was 14 years old from I can’t remember his name.  He was a schoolteacher at Issaquah for the grand sum of $15.00.  It was an old 31 Chev, four door, black, with twin side mount tires.  I used it to go up on Sunday night to start the fans in the coalmines, etc. and of course to do my paper route.  Remember gas was only 15cents a gallon then.  But the police were always looking for me, especially old Don LaLanne then highway patrol but I would take my bike and scout around the neighborhood and if I didn’t see him would take the car out.  After about three months of cat and mouse this guy from Renton offered me $15.00 for the car so I took it.  Waited another year before I bought my next car and it was a hot rod, too much so and had a chance to sell it for a $100.00 more than I paid so sold it and bought a model A Ford for $25.00.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

There is not too many memories of these organizations as only the businessmen belonged to them.  Later on in my life I was a member of the Issaquah Junior Chamber of Commerce.  We did a lot of things to help the schools with programs like contests that had national merit but as like other things there was only so many to do the work and you “pooed” out and it went down the road.  I also am a 45-year member of the Masonic Lodge but am not really an attending member as other things like the family came first.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

I think everyone in the area knew the Sportsmen Club.  They were a good old bunch of boys.  You could go up there and shoot and watch and just enjoy the day.  If you enjoyed hunting, listening to the ones that did some of the big hunting telling tales about their hunting trips up to Canada, etc.  It was built when I was only three years old; but used to go up when I could with my father and uncles.

I used to go up and watch the guys shoot clay pigeons and go in by the big fireplace and get warm and then later on used to go up and do some shooting.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

After World War II when they opened up the old Firemen’s Hall for a few years we would go down there in the evening and wrestle and play some basketball, etc. but that only lasted like a year.  Never did see a gun firing range down there.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

As members of the Grange we used to attend the dinner, etc. up there.  Later on after World War II they seemed to cease.  As people did not have to rely on local things to do they were wandering more away from the old hometown things so it just seemed to fad into the dust.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

Being my father was involved in mining since he was about twelve years old being his father was killed in the mines he and my one uncle had to take over so I personally was not involved in mining was up and around to see what they did.  He never wanted me to go into the mines but my uncle would take me in on the cars to see what it was all about.  It was over twelve miles in from where the fish hatchery dam is on the creek to where they were mining coal.  My father worked probably at every mine in the area and the ones that he was not at my uncles were at.  When the mines would slow down then they would go up in the woods and log.  But back to the mines:  I have been down in a number of them from Grand Ridge to over in New Castle.  And my father always said: “I never want you to be a miner”.

 

What were the working conditions like in the mine? Which mine did you work for, and what was your job?

Naturally working in the mines was cold and wet, with the water dripping from the roofs.  It was hard work and it was very dangerous.  You were dirty every night and smelled of coal.  My father being he was the maintenance man for the mines was practically in them all.  When they had troubles like with a minor cave-in he would have to go in and fix it up or other things go wrong he would have to fix it so they could keep working.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Used to go and see the western which were always on either Friday or Saturday night and then when colored movies came out WOW used to get to go and see them on Sundays as that was the only day that they had the colored ones.  We used to pay 10cents to go and see the movie and it was either 10 or 15cents for the popcorn but it was too dry.

Up in the back corner was mainly for the people who smoked when I went there.

 

Front Street

The dog in this picture looks like my old Uncle Joe’s dog, Spot.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

Well really as I remember there were only three churches in Issaquah and they were the Catholic, the Community, which all others attended, and the Bethel Chapel.

Well I as so many attend the Community Church, which is still standing down in back of Darigold.  We would get a new minister about every two or three years as this was not a big church like you would find in Seattle but it was a very friendly church where everyone knew and talked afterwards with each other and the ministers were all real to life.  It was really good old days.  I think most all the ministers stood out in one way or another as they were all real to life people and no one was better than the other.  Some who had families worked other jobs besides being ministers here to I think stay here but then of course after a period of time they would get a calling to a bigger church or retire.

 

Additional Memories

How many remember hiking down the railroad track to Hans Jensen’s old farm on Lake Sammamish to go swimming in the evening?  We used to take our fishing poles along with us and cast them out at the mouth of the small creek that ran into the lake.  It started up at Laughing Jacob Lake which is now the Tower horse Ranch.  As it got later in the evening we would build a fire on the beach as it was part of sand bar and then swim till late in the evening and if you seen your fishing pole bobbing well then you swam to beat heck over to it and grabbed it before it went in the lake if it was a fish of any size.  Most of the fish we caught off the mouth of the creek there were cutthroat trout.  In the late evening you might catch a catfish.

How about the old water tower just south of town where the steam engines used to take on water before beginning the long pull up the grade to North Bend?  Do you remember going up there and of course there were always a few Knights of the Open Road waiting for a train to take them on to their next spot?  As the train used to connect with the main line up at North Bend and from there go on East.

How about the old blueberry farm up at Pine Lake where the old guy that owned it came down to Issaquah every morning and picked us up to go up and pick the blueberries on the place?  I think the reason that most of us went was that we had a little over a half an hour lunch in which we would all go down to his dock and go swimming in Pine Lake.

How many remember or knew that the Pine Lake Plateau or Sammamish now used to be known as chicken hill?  The biggest chicken farms in Washington were up here on the plateau.  Does any one remember how many there were?????  Come on give it a guess before I tell you.  Lets see how close you are.  OK there were nine big ones up here not counting everyone up here had some stock of some kind.

There used to be an old swamp at the end of the play field at the old three-story brick schoolhouse.  How many remember during recess running out there to slide on the ice and then at night going up there if it was a moonlit night?  There was so much brush that there would only be maybe two feet of water on it.

How about the Nudist Camp?????  Were you ever with a bunch who hiked up thru the woods and climbed the trees near there and then when they seen you they would crack off a shotgun or maybe it was firecrackers and we would drop out of the trees like leaves falling and run for town.  But a few of you were caught and then had to spend the day up there and then they brought you back to Issaquah that night and did you get the Hee Haw from those of us that did not get caught.  How many of you got caught???

Another thing that some of the braver ones or more foolish ones would do was go across the railroad trestle up across where I-90 is going just out of town.  You really never knew when a train would come by as there was work trains coming through most anytime.  Also there could be what we called the “speeder.”  It was stationed here in back of Tony and Johnnie’s old store when the railroad kept a crew here to keep the track in order.  If you were out in the middle it could be a long run to the other end before the train got there but then the train really was not a passenger it mainly hauled logs, etc. and of course freight so it was quite a bit slower.  It used to connect with the main line up in North Bend and then go on East from there.  How many of you remember some nights when the train was trying to pull a big load up the grade from Issaquah to North Bend?  You could hear it huffing and puffing and then the wheels would spin.  Finally after it seemed like hours it would back down to Issaquah and take off half the cars it was towing and then take that load to North Bend for transfer and come back for the other half.

There is so much memories around Issaquah and the general area that you could have a book as thick as the Webster’s dictionary and still not get it all.

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Lorraine Swanson Morton

 Name:Lorraine Swanson Morton

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

I was born in Seattle, but grew up south of Issaquah on the family homestead, and with the exception of some college years and two years of my husband’s military time, that’s where I’ve lived all my life (and continue to live).

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

There’s no place like home.

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

1st through 6th grade @ Clark Elementary

7th through 9th grade @ Issaquah Junior High (now Issaquah Middle)

10th through Graduation @ Issaquah High School

 

Family History in Issaquah:

Mom’s notes cover it!

 

Education — Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

I entered Issaquah High in September 1964. Chuck Fallstrom was the principal and later, in 1972 when I began working for the Issaquah School District, he was still principal. Even when we became colleagues, he was always MR. Fallstrom to me! A very fine man who always had the best interests of students in Issaquah High in mind.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Mrs. Piercey, business ed teacher. In addition to teaching shorthand and typing, she often had fresh flowers on her desk – she advised putting a drop of Clorox or an aspirin in the vase to keep the bacteria away and the flowers fresher longer. I still do that today! Others I remember well include Mr. Tonstad, Mr. White, Miss Crelly, Mr. Coyle, and Mr. Klein.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

In 1965 I was sitting in French class behind my friend Jan Yourglich’s boyfriend (now her husband of 31 years) Rick Quandt. Rick turned around and said “EARTHQUAKE” about the same time the teacher said “EARTHQUAKE – get under your desks” She ran out of the room and I don’t remember much beyond that. As we reflected about the earthquake for this book, Rick said he recalled a big mess on the sidewalk outside the liquor store, which was located on Front Street at that time!

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

I remember a store about where Issaquah Floral is now. I think it was called DorMax and it was a clothing store owned and operated by sisters, Doreen Dahlbotten and Maxine Maulsby. I can remember buying my mom a sweater set there for Mother’s Day…maybe in the early 60s.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

Yes, we grocery shopped at The Grange and had a frozen food locker there. My most vivid memory of The Grange was the day that we pulled up to go in and everyone got out of the car, my aunt and cousin were with us, and I slammed the car door shut with my cousin Tom’s fingers still in the door! We were probably 9 or 10 years old at the time. Ouch! I don’t remember anything else from that day.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

My two favorites were The Shamrock Café which was on Front Street approximately where the Shanghai Garden and parking lot are now. Mike Shain owned it. I recall sitting at the counter with my dad – he always said no one could make a better real blackberry pie than Rena, Mike’s wife! And I loved their Green River sodas.

Also, the Honeysuckle on Front Street which was about where the Front Street Gallery is now. At that time it was also the bus station.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

I worked at Boehm’s all through high school, 1965-1967. It was a wonderful place to work. Julius Boehm encouraged us to try the candy: “You can’t describe it to a customer if you don’t know what it tastes like.” When I began there Julius asked if I preferred light or dark chocolate. Me, who’d only had Hershey bars before, answered, “Probably light.” He told me that before long I’d find that dark chocolate was the best – much more depth and character. He was right. In answer to the question “Don’t you get tired of candy?” the answer, for me, was nope. I just changed from week to week – one week it was Divinity, the next week dark chocolate Rocky Road or Opera Roll, the next week peanut brittle or dark caramels. On Sundays Julius would fix lunch for the staff. A favorite was pork chops and mashed potatoes with spinach!

Co-workers at that time included Robin Pickering Taylor, Martha Hall, Martha Willard, and Robin’s mom, Rae Pickering. Rae was like a hostess, manager, and dorm mom rolled into one. She was lovely and solved our scheduling problems and answered our questions. Julius relied on her a great deal.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

Many of my classmates were in the service during the war in Viet Nam. Bob Arndt, IHS Class of 1965, was killed over there and his name is listed on the Viet Nam Veterans’ Memorial wall in Olympia and Washington, D.C. I’m proud to remember Bob and all the others who served in the military services.

 

Issaquah Round-Up– Salmon Days– Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I remember big crowds for the Labor Day parade. When I was little, 5 or 6, my mom and aunt baked a lot of cookies and dressed my cousin Tom and me up as the King and Queen of Hearts and I got to hand out cookies along the parade route. Another year my dad built a boat around a bicycle and poor Tom had to peddle the bike “towing” me “water skiing” behind him! Dad had to jump out of the crowd and help push us over the railroad tracks on Sunset!

 

Farming and Dairy

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

I remember the parachute jumpers who landed in the Pickering field that’s now home to Trader Joe’s, Cucina! Cucina!, and Barnes and Noble. I sure loved watching them.

 

Railroad– Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

Not frequently, and when we did go in, it was kind of a big deal. We usually took the bus from Issaquah to Seattle and got off near the Bon. We usually had lunch at Bartell’s Drugstore or the restaurant in the Bon.

 

Fraternal Organizations– Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

My dad belonged to the Masons and my mom is still active in Eastern Star. I joined Rainbow when I was 12 and belonged until I reached “majority” at 20. I thought it was a great organization for young women, teaching poise, values, character and how to walk in high heels! I really remember wearing awful Suntan colored nylons – they were practically red in color.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

We lived out of town and I didn’t go to the movies too often. I remember seeing West Side Story twice with my friend, Jan, who lived in town and saw it at least five times! Was there kissing in the back? I don’t remember a thing about that.

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