Primary Source

Nelliemae Smart Nolet

Name: Nelliemae (Smart) Nolet

Birth Date or Year (optional): 

November 13, 1914

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

From 1914 until marriage in 1934

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Went to Issaquah Grade School and Issaquah High School.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

Those were post-depression days and the Senior Class of 1933 couldn’t afford the Year Book or Annual.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

I was very fond of my First Grade teacher in 1920-21.  Her name was Miss MacMaster.

In High School Superintendent Maurice J. Thomas, James Stevens, Ernest Edgerton, Clara Bean.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

My children, Laurene and Larry, were in school in Issaquah during the 1949 earthquake.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

My home was North of town near where Gilman Village is now.  The home I was born in is in Gilman Village, now named “The Sweet Shop.”  The building near it, I believe it is a dress shop, was the garage and woodshed.  The Model T, and later the Model A’s, were housed there.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

The Wold Store          –   Andy Wold

Lewis Hardware          –   J.  J. Lewis

Red and White Store  –   Leonard Miles

Johns’ Grocery           –   Mr. Johns and wife, Ada.

Grange Store

Eaves Clothing           –    Miss Eaves

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

“Depression” days and years didn’t allow for many Beauty Shop visits.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

I always wondered how anyone could get something from those high shelves.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

I went to school with Tony and Johnny!  We traded at the Johns’ Grocery (under the IOOF Hall).

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

My parents had a Frozen Food Locker.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

I think I mainly went to Stevenson’s Drug Store, Rena’s was later.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

This came after I married in 1934 and moved away.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

We grew our own vegetables and Mother canned over 300 quarts of vegetables and fruit every summer.  I went to the Summit of Snoqualmie Pass every weekend and four summers with Mrs. R. J. (Lena) Schneider.  I washed dishes in the restaurant owned by Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Schneider.  After dishes, and dishes, and dishes, the other young folks and I would take great hikes.  In the winter we went skiing.  In those days you “herring-boned” to the top of a hill, yelled “TRACK,” and when everyone was out of the way, you went “straight” down.  No slalom skiing then.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

I wasn’t living in Issaquah then, but my younger brother, John Raymond Smart, was a B-26 pilot and killed October 1943, when his bomber went down in the Mediterranean.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

I liked going to the Rodeo.  Such excitement in Issaquah during those few days each year!

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

My Grandfather, John Anderson, owned the acres from Pickering farm to Lake Sammamish.  Many the trips my brothers and I walked through the pastures – and avoiding curious cows – to wade and play in the water near the mouth of Issaquah Creek.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

I have lived on West Lake Sammamish since 1941, and we saw the Monohon Mill burn, two different times.

 

Farming and Dairy

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

My grandparents lived across the road from the Pickering Farm, and across the creek from the C. W. Peters Farm.

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

My father worked at the creamery for a time, before the Depression.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

I had three Aunts who lived in Seattle, and to visit them, we had to drive to Renton, around the end of Lake Washington, north on Empire Way, and on to the north part of Seattle.  A long drive in those old cars.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

My husband, Ted Nolet, owned a 1929 Model A when we married, but after World War II he was employed at Hepler Ford Motors until it was sold.  Then he worked at Stonebridge Chevrolet.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

Yes – as a teen-ager, in the late 20’s and early 30’s the dances were great fun.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Mr. and Mrs. Brunsberg owned the theater when I was younger.  I can’t remember how much it cost, but those silent movies were fun.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

My brother and I attended the Sunday School in the Baptist Church near the creek at the north end of town – near the Grange and Creamery.

Back to the Memory Books

Chuck Olson

Name: Chuck Olson

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

Born in Swedish Hospital but raised on Lake Sammamish.  Family history- father Clifford Olson called Ole and his parents were married in Gile, WI in 1904.  Father Charles mother Helga- my dad was born in 1912 in Issaquah.

Mother Carmen Ek- her father George one of 8 children.  He was born in 1890 in Preston, WA.  His parents Anton and Christine homestead 320 acres where the Echo Lake Interchange is (Where I-90 meets highway 18).  In 1899 they moved to Issaquah and built a house at 695 Rainier Blvd. N.  This house is still there and is rented out by my cousin Jim Peterson.  My mothers maiden name Hazel Alexander.  Hazel was born on Lake Sammamish near Monohon, her mother (Caroline) and Father Thomas settled on Lake Sammamish in the 1880s.  He was the “straw boss” for the Seattle Lakeshore Railroad.  They decided to stay in Issaquah.  The Alexander house on Gilman is their old house that was moved there in the 1980s.  It is neat for me to have both of my grandparents houses within a block from each other.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

Why leave, after college I got a teaching job at Maywood Junior High in the Issaquah School District.  Its my home and I have no reason to leave.

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

1)   The old administration building next to the old green gym. 2) Clark 3) Preston 4) Sunset 5) Issaquah Junior High 6) Issaquah High

 

Family History in Issaquah: See above

Alexander family- Thomas and Caroline moved to Issaquah in 1887, lived on Lake Sammamish- my grandparents

Ek family- Anton and Christina in Issaquah in 1899 from Preston

Olson Family- Charles and Helga moved to Issaquah in 1906

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

I was at IHS from Fall of 1963-Spring 1966.  Issaquah High was a really fun experience for me.  Everyone knew each other and their families- things did change in 1964-5 when new people started to move into the area- schools started to grow, slowly.  I had a great three years at IHS.  I was successful in sports, had a lot of friends, and many great teachers.  Some of the teachers that influenced me were- Roger Wilson- he was my P.E. and wrestling coach- I probably learned more about life being involved in wrestling than anything else.  Roger taught me what hard work can do for your abilities to be great.  Another was Wally Soland who I remember for his sense of humor.  George Nomadnick (?) was my football coach and taught me a lot about leadership- which began on the football field.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Minnie knew everything about “old” Issaquah.  If you needed a person identified from a photo, the chances are she would know someone in the photo.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

In 1965 I was in school.  Mrs. Smith’s English II class at IHS.  Mrs. Smith was so scared she froze against the chalkboard.  Sitting in class you could look out the window and see the ground rolling at about 3-4 feet.  After the shaking was over Mr. Fallstrom came over the intercom and said we were having an earthquake.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I played football all three years from 63-66 and played varsity.  I was a starter my junior and senior years and was all conference my junior year.  In wrestling I was league champ at heavyweight my senior year and my junior year.

In track I competed in shot put and discus.  My best shot put was 51’- 11” and was alternate to district.

The most memorable game was my junior year when Greg Fields from Lake Washington High School and Donnie Grimm hit head on full speed.  I was on the field 40 yards away and it sounded like a freight train hitting another train.  They both bounced up like nothing had happened.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

My grandparents owned Alexander’s Beach Resort on Lake Sammamish.  So during my free time we were working, hunting, fishing, water skiing, boating, etc.  I had a great time growing up.  I made money working at the resort and had fun on the lake.  I almost never would go to Issaquah.  But if I did I would go to the Honeysuckle and look at the Hoods- kids in leather jackets smoking cigarettes.  I would usually order a Green River but sometimes ordered a graveyard.  We would also go to the Shamrock Café but you had to order something to sit at the booths, if you didn’t order you were asked to leave.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

My grandfather was George Ek and he knew everyone, so as a young person we went to many different businesses.  Grange Supply, Wold’s Hardware, Lewis Hardware, the Feed Store, Stonebridge Chev., Jerry Malone Ford, Dick’s and Alex’s.  Everyone in Issaquah shopped in Issaquah so, there were many businesses downtown.

My favorite was Tony’s and Johnny’s Grocery Store.  I went there all the time, when I went to town Joe Hirko used to give me cold wiener dogs to eat.  My mother never drove and my dad would stop at night, after work, and pick up groceries my mother had called in earlier.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Lewis Barber Shop- Dave Lewis was my barber for many years.  We also were very good friends- we went hunting and fishing together many times.  He was a great guy but, don’t let him talk too much or all your hair was gone.  He was very knowledgeable and thought he knew it all.  He could quote the Bible or law books.  But, he was also a real kidder and would lead you along also.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

I remember Tom, Rita, Ed, and Laura.  But Ed was my favorite because he was a hunter and would tell stories about hunting.  When you went there we would always enter from the back and they filed saws and I would always talk to them.  I remember getting my hunting and fishing licenses there.  They, the Lewis Family, were always very friendly to me and made me feel like I was important.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Tony & Johnny’s was the best.  I remember George Reiny (?).  He was always friendly in his own way.  Tony always was very friendly and outgoing.  He always talked to you and asked how you were.  He made you feel important.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

No, it is like now, people pick a store and my family only went to Tony’s & Johnny’s.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

I used to go to the Honeysuckle and have a Green River.  Most kids went to the Shamrock because the Hoods with leather jackets hung out at Drylie’s Honeysuckle and smoked cigarettes.  But at the Shamrock you had to buy something to sit at a booth, so you had to have money to go there.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Yes, but only on special occasions.  It was too expensive.  More for richer folks of Issaquah and Seattle.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

When Dick Taylor bought the H & H we used to stop by after softball games.  Also, the Gaslamp, Fasano’s.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

My grandpa went up there almost everyday to buy something.  It was a great place to find out what was happening and to get stuff for the resort.  Most of the time he would go there to shoot the bull.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

I went there right up until they closed and continued when Richard Seok bought it.  The Lawills were very nice people- a real mom and pop store.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

Labor Day was something we all looked forward to.  The Carnival would come to town and the Carney  people were really something.  They would work all day and drink all night.  They were grumpy men and everyone was scared of them.  It was a great time of the year, the end of the summer and the beginning of the school year.  I still think back and am disappointed they went to October and Salmon Days- it almost always rains.  When we had Labor Day it almost never rained and it wasn’t so commercialized as it is today.  It has become a big flea market rather than a transition from summer to school.  Labor day was for the kids- Salmon Days is for the City to make money.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

Every year was great- we looked forward to the Parade, the Carnival, and seeing friends you did not see all summer.  Also to she how the girls changed, if you know what I mean.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

I really remember the Games of Chance, and the Octopus ride, the Hammer- we would ride until we got sick.  Then have some more great food.  I remember playing bingo at the Lions Club booth.  Salmon Days went from an O.K. alternate to Labor Days- The reason Labor Day was dropped was because too many drunks & rowdy people and the police couldn’t maintain control.  Salmon Days started out where Labor Day ended.  But now Salmon Days is to sell things rather than to celebrate the end of summer.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

Bill Bergsma would dress up in the Santa Claus suit and visit homes in Issaquah.  As kids we all knew who he was but we never let him know.  It was really neat to have him come to my cousin’s house and give us presents.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

My grandparents owned Alexander Beach Resort. We lived there in the little house on the beach and in 1954 we moved to the new house my dad built across the road.  So, when I was a kid I was either down at the resort or sleeping.  I was working, hanging out with Grandpa, shooting ducks, fishing, water skiing, swimming and doing cannonballs off the high dive.  I had two cousins, Lee and Bill Haro, they lived next to me and we would go hunting all the time.  We would row all around the south end of the lake chasing ducks.  I continued to hunt until the lake closed for hunting.  We would always play cat and mouse with the Park Rangers.  They didn’t like us hunting in the park- well we knew it was illegal, but we were kids. The fish we would catch were trout, bass, perch, sunfish, carp, man we did it all.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

Lake Sammamish has many different types of fish.  We would usually fish in the summer but would fish on the house dock (the house dock was an old hunter’s cabin that was built on logs, it floated across the lake in the 1950s and we kept it).  In the winter- we would sit in the house where we had a stove and look out and watch our poles.  All the old timers would come down and fish and I would have a great time listening to all the stories, what a great time to grow up. There were trout-rainbows, cutthroat, silvers, (L8andlock sockeye salmon).  There were small mouth and large mouth bass, perch, sunfish, carp, bluegill, squah fish, suckers.

I usually fished only on Lake Sammamish and very seldom fished on Issaquah Creek.

I remember fishing off the dock at Alexander’s Beach for perch.  We would get about 6 or 7 people and lots of worms.  It was during the summer and after a hot day, we only did this once or twice a summer, we would wait until almost dark.  We would put lanterns out to attract the fish and we would catch enough perch to fill a 50 lb sack.  Boy that was fun.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

I wonder why Vasa Park is mentioned.  Almost all of the Issaquah people would go to my grandparent’s resort- Alexander’s Beach.  The resort was named after my great-grandparents who bought the property in 1888.  Alexander’s was the people’s choice for resorts.  I remember the moms and kids of several families coming down during the hot days of summer and after work the dads coming down for dinner and relaxation.  I didn’t know anyone who went to Vasa Park except when they had the Swedish Picnic, once a summer.  It was more of a Bellevue, Lake Hills resort.  After the State Park opened most people went there because it was free.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Sometimes I would go to Pine Lake or Beaver Lake but it would get really warm and it was always colored like tea.  Lake Sammamish was the best.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

The Monohon Mill I remember was a mill that made moldings for doors.  I remember getting sawdust and shavings for my grandparent’s resort, Alexander’s Beach.  I remember going to Red Hall’s Mill to get sawdust, and he was another character.  He would always give me a jar of his home cured salmon eggs for trout fishing.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

The Monohon Fire in 1924 burned down the town and the mill.  My mother remembered fires also around the hillside.  People had to sit on their roofs because the hot embers would land on the roofs.  She said the hot embers were as big as basketballs.  Since the roofs were shake they had to sweep them off so the house wouldn’t catch fire.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

The salmon hatchery was always neat to visit.  I remember field trips to the hatchery in the 1950s.  I think it has been a positive thing and helped the community by educating about the fish cycle.  I remember one time shooting Mergansers (fish ducks) that were eating the little fish in the holding ponds by Gibson Hall.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

I used to work haying season at Woodside’s.  The Woodside Farm was where the new courthouse and Fed Ex is now.  It was a dairy farm.  Sometimes I helped them milk the cows.  During hunting season we would hunt ducks on the property.  I really enjoyed Stu Woodside and it was something I will always remember.

 

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

The Pickering Farm was bigger than Woodside’s and was very well known around the community.  I worked for them only a few times during the haying season.

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

I didn’t but my dad, grandfather, and uncle worked there at one time in their life.  I do remember going into the office as a young man and getting a free ice cream bar from their freezer.  I also remember going to the boiler room and looking at their pin-up calendars on the wall.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

I didn’t go to Seattle very much because the traffic was so bad and the one way streets were so confusing.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

I-90 left Issaquah alone and on the side of the road, which we were. Highway 10 went through the north part of town and when I-90 was built a lot of businesses closed.  But, I-90 sure made it easier to cross Gilman Blvd. (The old HWY 10 Road).

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

My first car was a 1957 Chevrolet from Stonebridge.  Stonebridge was the place where I would go to hang out with the men.  I would just drop by and shoot the fat with the mechanics.  Most of the mechanics would also go over fishing with us to Burke Lake near George.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

My grandfather, George Ek, and my uncle Elmer Haro were very involved in the Lions Club.  They would attend meetings in the basement of the Eagle’s Club.  I was once a speaker at a meeting just after I started teaching in Issaquah.  I also remember the annual Lions Club picnic and all the food, games and especially the Bingo games at the Labor Day celebration.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

I remember as a kid going to the Annual Turkey Shoot.  I remember Jake Lott who used to run the raffle.  He would spin a big wheel and when it stopped he would yell out the number and the winner would get a turkey.  The clubhouse was a log cabin and really neat.  I felt like I was going back in years and felt like Daniel Boone or Davy Crockett could have lived there.  Those community get-togethers were very important to all the people of Issaquah.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

I remember the basement of the old VFD Hall.  We used it as a dressing room for Little League Football but by the early 1960s it was falling apart.  I remember Pete Radamacher, the Fighter, training in the top floor of the VFD Hall.  I also remember the fire siren on top of the building.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

I remember my Cub Scout banquet up above the Grange Hall and Wedding Receptions.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

I was much too young to be involved in mining, but my grandfather was working in the Grand Ridge Mine.  My grandfather, George Ek, was living at the family home on Rainier Ave. N. (The house is still there.)  They had a wash room just outside the house with a small pot belly stove in it and a wash basin.  That is where the miners would clean-up after work.  Mining- coal- was a very dirty job.  They would come home black with coal dust all over.  My grandfather quit the day his lunchbox was smashed by a landslide 15 minutes after he ate his lunch there.

 

 

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

We called the back upper corner the passion pit, but I never was old enough or had a girlfriend who would want to sit back there.  For many years almost every Friday night during the winter months my father would bring my sister and I up to Issaquah to go to the show.  He would go to the H & H Tavern and play cribbage until the movie was over.  My father quit drinking in the early 1940s and I thought it was unusual for anyone to go to a tavern and not drink beer.

 

Front Street

I remember Cussac’s Shoe Store.  It was next to Peter’s Agency.  Mr. Cussac was in his 80s and we would go in there to buy shoes.  The shoes smelled like leather.  It was dark and he had a ladder that would slide along tracts on the wall.  He needed the ladder to get at the upper shelves where he would store the shoes.  He had Parkinson’s- I guess- because his hands would shake and his head would shake.  He would speak in broken English and climb the ladder- (after he had measured your foot) and grab your box of shoes and try them on.  He was truly a very nice person and a real important asset to the Issaquah Community.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

I went to Sunday School at the Baptist Church on Rainier Blvd- behind Darigold- once.  I did not like it because it took away from my hunting/ fishing.

 

Additional Memories

The bowling alley was not mentioned in the Memory Book, but was a very important part of Issaquah history.

When I was about 10 years old until 16 I would bowl on the kids league every Saturday during the winter months.  There was several teams and we had a league.  My first trophy I ever won was my 1st place bowling trophy.  I played for Howard’s Bakery which was located next to the Eagles.  I would go in there and tell them I played for their team and I would get a free giant donut.  After they knew me I would always get a free donut.  Although, some Saturdays it was hard to make it there. It was a very worthwhile experience.  My highest game was a 205, but my average was 155?

AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)

Chuck Olson        3/22/2001

Sam & Alice Paschal

Name:Sam and Alice Paschal

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

We lived in Issaquah from 1958 to 2000. In 1958 we bought 10 acres of the original homestead of the pioneering Eastlick family.

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

We were trying to decide between Redmond and Issaquah. We chose Issaquah because of the good reports we had about the school system, teachers and parental involvement.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

Issaquah was our home. We had no intention of ever leaving. But a combination of things over the years caused us to move. Changes in the last few years on the plateau–  no longer rural, heavy traffic going by our home almost 24 hours a day, the rural lifestyle disappearing. And also we wanted to support work with Wycliffe Bible Translators/Summer Institute of Linguistics. We moved to Catalina, AZ. just outside of Tucson where the Mexico branch is headquartered. Sam is teaching computer software and I’m doing art work of all kinds for various booklets—rhymers, story books, etc. The translator, who has been translating that particular unwritten language for some time, then takes the books out to the villages as tools for the people to learn to read their own heart language.

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Our kids attended Issaquah schools. Linda went to Clark Elementary, then Sunny Hills on the plateau, the Jr. high and graduated from Issaquah High School in 1970. George and Elaine attended Sunny Hills, the Jr. High and graduated from the high school in 1972 and 1975.

 

Education—Coming of Age

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

The earthquake of 1965 was the first earthquake we’d ever experienced. When the house started rattling and shaking I thought my husband was doing something in the house. When it continued that was my first clue that it wasn’t Sam, it was an earthquake! We watched the light poles wave back and forth and the trees sway back and forth. It was scary and exciting at the same time. One of our daughters, Linda Paschal Gingrich, was in a portable classroom next to the old Junior High when the earthquake struck. Bricks from the Jr. High building began to fall around the portable. The kids were scared to death, sure that the building was going to fall on them and kill them. We’re thankful that the shaking stopped when it did or we could have had a tragedy. Our two younger children, George Paschal and Elaine Paschal Weinz were on their school bus on the way to Sunny Hills Elementary and didn’t feel a thing.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

Since our kids graduated from Issaquah High School I’ll tell you about their activities. All three were and are creative in many ways. Linda had Mr. Kline as a teacher and she was in various singing groups. She also acted in a number of school plays. George was involved with the theater group for a time in back stage work and had a questionable degree of reputation for his corny jokes that he made up. Elaine was involved in the FFA and her special love was for horses.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

We used to buy gasoline for our gas tank on our property, horse feed, garden supplies and equipment from Washington Farmers Association. As well as we can remember it was located about where the Darigold plant and its parking lot are. After WFA moved to Redmond we began to shop at the Grange.

The old Post Office used to be on the ground floor of the building where the health food store has been for some years – just east of the fish hatchery. As I remember, it was a small room with old, uneven, dark, wood floor boards that were well oiled and stained. We bought stamps or just talked with the postal employees through the old fashioned windows with metal grill work on them. Everything about it was very old fashioned and wonderful. Every time I went inside the Post Office it was as if I had stepped back in time to an earlier era.

At the corner of Front St. and Sunset was a feed store. It sat at an angle to both streets with a large concrete loading dock and drive up area for cars and trucks. That building was eventually moved to Gilman Village.

We shopped at the Rexall Drug Store for prescriptions and gifts. The owner and his wife were very personable people, enjoyable and fun to talk to. The gifts in their store were unique, tasteful, and beautiful.

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

I went to Evan’s Beauty Salon for hair styling. Bill Evans was the owner. He was a great entrepreneur and is a long time friend along with his wife, Betty.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Another old-fashioned store that was so interesting to go to. We bought tools and hardware items. Tom was friendly, very helpful, full of information and advice.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

We bought our groceries at the Grange in the Mercantile Building for some time. When the Hi-Lo shopping center was built we began to shop at the grocery store there. As part of their opening ceremonies they gave away a pony. Our eldest daughter had entered her name in the contest and it was drawn as the winner. We weren’t there but a friend of ours, Dorothy Giberson, was and excitedly called to let us know that Linda had won the pony! Then she offered to bring it home in the back of her jeep. Plus a bale of hay. What a sight that was as the jeep pulled into our pasture with the pony peering out of the windows. The kids named him Dynamite and he lived with us for a long time. Dynamite was a good little pony and put up with a lot of kids playing with him… at least for a time.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

We shopped at the Grange Mercantile Building for groceries and I liked shopping there. Their produce was very good. Some of the clerks became friends, and they were always cheerful and helpful. It was in a very convenient place to stop and shop. It was small, compared to the megastores today. But that was back in the days when Issaquah was small.

Yes we had rented a frozen food locker there.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

We went to the XXX Root Beer. I liked going there for lunch, pulling up into a parking slot and ordering a delicious, dripping hamburger, with fries of course, as I sat in my car. It was always fun to take the kids for a drink or snack.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

I usually went to Boehm’s Candies when a school class went there. What candies were my favorites? Any of them.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

Harriet Fish asked me, Alice, to be one of the three artists-in-action at the first Labor Day Celebration held in Issaquah. It was held on the grounds of the fish hatchery. We three sat outside in front of the buildings and Harriet demonstrated her skills on her spinning wheel. I did pencil portraits for $1(!!) each and another artist demonstrated his work. There must have been quite a crowd, because I remember leaning back and glancing up between portraits and seeing mobs of people covering the parking lot. A small juried art show was held inside the fish hatchery – with the drawings and paintings sitting on top of the fish tanks. The weather was terrific, we all had a fun and tiring time. It was an outstanding success.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

From the first year it has changed enormously. It grew like Topsy. From the fish hatchery with the local artists to the whole of downtown Issaquah with artists and crafts people from everywhere. I continued to be an artist in action for a few years, sitting in front of the floral shop, drawing portraits and displaying paintings. But my free lance art business grew to the point where I needed to spend more time in my studio. Those early years were invigorating. Old friends would stop and chat, and watch the drawing progress. It was so neat to meet new people and make new friends. And a delightful thing has happened as a result of those years sitting on Front street drawing portraits. Especially in the last few years as I shopped in Issaquah, I would run across someone who told me I drew their portrait 20-30 years ago. And did I remember?

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

Although this memory isn’t about special events in Issaquah, it is something I loved about Issaquah the first few years we lived there. It was much smaller then and although you may not have known everyone, you greeted each other as you passed on the sidewalks. A beautiful small town thing to do.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Our kids rode horses all over the south end of the plateau–  Yellow Lake, under the power lines, trails through open fields. In those years it was fairly safe to ride on the shoulders of the roads because of the small amount of traffic.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

The whole family went to Lake Sammamish State Park many years for picnics and swimming. Our church youth group often met at the park for hot dogs and a good time in the summer. During the winters if our pond froze we ice skated and played on it without skates. Other who lived nearby would drop in and join us. Even people from Seattle who were driving by stopped and skated with us at times. The pond was a shallow pond and there were always clumps of weeds and grasses poking their tops through the ice. It made for some exciting skating. When it snowed, friends and neighbors came over and we all slid down the hill in our pasture on sleds and inner tubes trying to see who could zoom as far as the barn and the pond. Sometimes we built a bonfire to gather around and warm up, but we always trooped back up to the house gathered around the kitchen stove drinking cups of steaming hot chocolate as we thawed out.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

We attended Covenant Presbyterian Church for many years. Our memories are fond ones of the people, good friends and pastors. But one pastor stands out in our memory and he was the young, new pastor who started the church, Pastor “Scotty”.

We attended Trinity Evangelical Church at High Point the last 20-25 years before we moved from Issaquah. We knew many of the people there before we started attending the church and those friendships deepened to become part of our family also.

 

Additional Memories

When our kids grew up and married they moved back to our land. We all lived there until the Issaquah-Fall City Road was finally widened. Their homes were taken by the county and because the Issaquah-Fall City Rd. was going to go through our pasture bringing it’s heavy traffic nearer to our home, we decided to sell also.

The road going through our pasture brings up a story that Milo (Mike) Eastlick told me soon after we moved in, back in the late 50’s. He was one of the sons of the pioneering family and delivered furnace oil for us from the Grange. We stood in the driveway of the old farmhouse talking one day and he told me the forty of why the Issaquah-Fall City Rd. made the s-turn around the other side of the ponds and woods. In the early years the original trail ran through the property from Fall City to Issaquah. Eventually it became a road connecting the two towns. The original house, the first one, was built in the pasture and near the road. That turned out to be too close as far as ‘mom’ was concerned. Because sometimes those that used the road were drunken Indians and ‘mom’ didn’t want them that close to her home. So she asked the men of the family to move the road! And they did. From the middle of the pasture to around the pond and woods, away from the farm house and mom.

But now, all these years later, the road is again following the same track as the old trail that had went through the pasture….. not as a trail, but as a 4 lane highway. Quite a change.

Each of us managed to get ourselves lost in the dense woods in the early years we lived on the plateau. We were still living in the old farm house when on Saturday afternoon Sam decided to look at the area off the old Issaquah-Fall City Rd. after it branches off Duthie Hill Rd. It was a gray day. The afternoon light was fading. After some wandering around he decided it was time to go home. But he couldn’t find his way back to the car on the road. He couldn’t even find the road! He could hear dogs barking in the distance and as the night time came he eventually snuggled down next to a fallen, moss covered log and spend the rest of the night shivering, waiting for the dawn. In the meantime I had called the sheriff’s department and our pastor. Both of them came and the sheriff assured me that people usually walk out of the woods the next day. And that’s what Sam did. He found the car the next morning and came home with his pants all ripped to shreds from belt to cuffs and smelling like skunk cabbage. We threw the pants in the garbage. I was so relieved to have him home even without his billfold. Something must have snagged it out of his hip pocket in his tramping around trying to find his way out. There it lay for years and years with a $20 bill tucked inside. Rotting away.

My unintentional choice for getting lost in the thick woods was around Beaver Lake area. A good friend of ours and I walked into the woods on one side of the Beaver Lake to find beaver ponds. We never found the beaver ponds, but we did find a section of an old railroad track somewhere in the woods. We did find a large swampy area. We walked and walked never getting anywhere and nothing looked familiar to her. As dusk came we looked for a spot that looked comfortable enough to spend the night. We gathered fir branches to cover ourselves to keep some warmth in and snuggled down under a huge fir tree. Sleep? Not at all. We, too, could hear dogs barking in the distance. At first light the next morning we started out again and walked for some time until we finally came out on the Duthie Hill Rd. We had walked around the end of Beaver Lake! From one side to the other! It was wonderful seeing civilization again, instead of just hearing it. We stopped at a nearby house and instantly shocked the lady who answered the door. From her home we phoned my husband and her family and told them we were ok. The woman took us home to where everybody was gathered. A sheriff was there this time, too, reassuring them that people who get lost in the woods overnight usually come out the next morning.

I hope this isn’t too long. If it is, just use anything you want . When the door is opened on one or two memories all the other memories start rushing forward and drowning in and the door bursts open all the way. It’s not easy to close again.

We moved to Washington in 1957 courtesy of Boeing. In  1958 we bought 10 acres on the south end of the plateau on the Issaquah-Fall City Rd, then called Vaughn Hill Rd. It was a nice 2 lane country road, with dirt shoulders and very little traffic.

Those 10 acres were part of the original homestead settled by the pioneering Eastlick family. For many years after we moved there people said to us “Oh yes, you’re the folks who lived on the old Eastlick place”. Yes, we were indeed those folks and were delighted to be identified in that way, but we laughingly wondered when our home would become known as the old Paschal place.

The old farm house, a root cellar and outbuildings were grouped together at one side of the property. The large old barn was down near the pond and the woods. There was a hand dug well near the pond that had the sweetest water we’ve ever tasted.

We discovered some wonderful old items from the turn of the century and earlier. In the barn we discovered a beautiful old buggy covered with straw and dust. In the attic of the farm house we found old hat pins, and some stiff collars that men wore in the early part of the century. In a storage area was on old Metzger Map of the area that showed the road from Seattle to Snoqualmie Pass. As the road neared the pass it became a trail, according to the map. I don’t remember the date on the map.

About 3 ½ years after we moved in, all those things along with our own possessions were lost when the old farm house burned down. Immediately people began to gather around us and we were overwhelmed by the outpouring of gifts and love from our friends, neighbors, churches and from strangers in Issaquah and other towns. The kids were given nice clothes to wear to school. Practically everything we lost was replenished  because so many people gave and gave. It went on for days. One neighbor in Overdale Park, Phyllis Lind—a stranger at the time, brought 5 toothbrushes and a tube of toothpaste because she heard about this family of 5 who had lost everything in a fire. The day of the fire, Gaye Schembs, another neighbor a few miles away who didn’t know us at all, invited us to move into a small farm home on their property until we could rebuild. We accepted her offer and began to build a Pan-Abode Log home on the hill above where the old house stood. We moved into our new home a few months later and lived there until we moved in May , 1999.

The pasture, barn, pond and woods were used for all kinds of things….lots of space for kids to play, and for mom to sit out under the apple trees and read and soak up on nature. Trees to climb, ball games, hide and go seek, camp outs, bonfires to gather around, snug places in the woods to sit and dream and pray, the shallow pond to tromp through, get wet and muddy while trying to catch tadpoles. Wild animal trails through the woods, wild animals to see and hear. Eagles playing in the sky above us. Red-tailed hawks soaring overhead or sitting in the big cherry tree in the pasture looking for a meal. Horses to ride and pet and love. Over the years we had cows, pigs, goats (to eat the ubiquitous blackberries, but they ate everything but blackberry bushes), chickens for fresh eggs that we sold through a produce stand we had for a while.

An equestrian club, the Pony Club, met at our place for a number of years under Sam’s leadership as District Commissioner. The pasture was a great place, a safe one, for the budding –would-be-driver to learn how to manage a car, drive in a straight line, turn, back up, park and not be a terror on the roads.

Back to the Memory Books

Colleen Darst Petersen

Name: Colleen A. Petersen

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

I’ve lived here all of my life.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

I stayed here because my parents were here, I had a job here, and at that time I enjoyed the town.

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Clark Elementary, Issaquah Junior High, and Issaquah High School.

 

Family History in Issaquah:

I go back to the first Bush’s.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

I remember starting high school in the old building, double shifting after the earthquake, and finally getting into our new high school building.  I was in the locker bay when we got word of John Kennedy’s death.  That was a sad day.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

I didn’t have Minnie as a teacher, but I was privileged to have her as a friend.  She’s one of the few people I’ve known to have an incredible wealth of memory that she would share with others.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

I was a little too young for the earthquake damage to the schools in 1949, but our schools were damaged in 1965.  Because of it, we had to double shift and share the high school building with the junior high kids until we could get into our new high school.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I was in the Home Ec. Club, which always served milk and cookies to the sports players after their games.  Ha ha.  It’s funny when I think back on it now.  I participated in several school plays and musicals.  I was also in FNA (Future Nurses of America) and we worked as candy stripers at the Villa.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

My friends and I all had jobs in the summer.  One friend was state president of the Baptist youth, so we spent a lot of time supporting her by accompanying her when she visited many different churches.  If we had free time, my aunt’s house on Lake Sammamish was a favorite place.  As for getting punished, the town was so small that if someone saw you doing something, your parents would already know about it by the time you got home.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Mr. Brady’s Dry Goods Store was located a little bit east of where the Texaco on Front and Sunset is now.  You could buy everything from material to shoes.  I remember talking to Mr. Brady about saving a sweater that I was saving money to buy for my brother’s Christmas present.  It took me a long time to save because it cost $13.00, but he never told and he never let on to my brother.  Mr. Cussac’s Leather and Harness Shop smelled like no other.  The floor was wooden, the shoes were all leather, and Mr. Cussac had a genuine scar from dueling.  He had a thick accent and had a distinct manner about him when he spoke.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

The first beauty shop that I went to was Alpha’s.  It had a large old-fashioned perm machine and a big fluffy grey kitty.  After that we went to Evan’s Salon of Beauty.  A popular hairdo was the D.A., and later the Beehive.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

What wasn’t memorable about Lewis Hardware!  You could get just about anything you needed and they would tell you how it worked at the same time.  It was always like going home.  My mom purchased my new green bicycle there for my twelfth birthday.  Ed Lewis delivered it by riding it to my house!  What a thrill!

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

We bought our groceries at Stevens’, which was in the IOOF building.  The sweetest people in the world owned that store!  Harry and Rae Stevens.  If you wanted cheese you would ask for a pound or so and Harry would pull out a huge knife and cut you the amount you had asked for.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

I can’t remember buying anything at the Grange, but I do remember having what I thought was a huge frozen food locker.  I also remember when the refrigeration broke and lots of food went bad.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

As a kid there was the Honeysuckle, which was run by Tom Drylie.  It was also the place where you caught the bus to go to Seattle.  Mr. Drylie was very stiff and tall and he also had an artificial leg, which made all of us kids curious.  Mike Shane’s Shamrock had great ice cream, green rivers, and a drink called brown cow.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Boehm’s Candy was a real treat with my favorite being Truffles.  We were all surprised when Mr. Boehm married a girl near our age.  It was to be his only marriage.  I did know of a friend who had a birthday party upstairs in the chalet.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

I remember of a tavern at the intersection of Sunset and Newport.  It was called Park Inn, and there was a carport covered with grapes.  Also, behind it had many cabins that were rented out.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

Lawill’s drug store was a place of wonder.  Not only did it carry a myriad of things but it had two old-fashioned ice cream parlor chairs inside.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

The coming to town of the carnival was the beginning of the Labor Day Celebration.  It came on Friday, Carnival Night was Saturday, the “Kiddie Parade” was Sunday, and the “Big  Parade” was on Monday.  Growing up, I participated in both parades.  A queen was chosen to reign over the festivities.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

Every year was one to look forward to.  I loved going to play bingo at the booth in memorial field and also eating the corn on the cob at the Demolay booth.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

The carnival at Labor Day was always a highlight, especially its’ large Ferris wheel. There was also a big merry-go-round and the “octopus.”  The crowning of our queen was always exciting.  This was a time when the townsfolk could really come together and socialize.  Labor Day was more of a town celebration than Salmon Days has been.  At Salmon Days you can walk the street and never see anyone you know.  Salmon Days is more of an arts fair.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

The Easter egg hunt at Gibson Park was a highlight for the youngsters.  To find the egg wrapped in silver meant you took home a big chocolate bunny.  But to find the egg wrapped in gold meant you took home a real live bunny!  My brother taught me to pass up the little candy eggs and go straight for the hard-boiled ones.  I also remember a really wonderful town talent show held at the old high school where the pool is now.  The older men really could sing up a storm!  The old Morgan gym was the site where we held our Campfire council fires.  One in particular was memorable to me when I received so many beads that they went clear to the floor when placed around my neck.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Everyone spent a lot of free time outside whether it was gardening, picnicking, or just having fun.  Most Saturdays I would get up early, put on my boots, get my fishing basket that held a butter horn that my mom had wrapped, and off I would go with my dad.  He always told me to be quiet or I would scare the fish – and I believed him!  He also took me on regular walks in the woods.  Most of the time, he would take me until I got lost and then make me find our way home.  We also would look for tracks whether it was bear or cougar.  Yes they have been around that long!

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

People who fished in Issaquah Creek didn’t take time to count their catch.  They were plentiful and large.  A two-foot trout was not uncommon.  I and every other kid in town fished in the derby.  There were always a few who would cheat, but they never won.  Now, too many people and buildings have taken away the pleasures of yesterday.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Vasa Park meant hours of roller-skating under the disco ball.  It was a night of fun doing the hokey-pokey, etc., and talking with friends.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Sammamish, Beaver, and Pine Lakes were favorites for summer swimming and picnicking.  Issaquah Creek was also a favorite for swimming with several good swimming holes.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

The Monohon Mill was built next to East Lake Sammamish.  The Red Hall’s mill was close to home.  My brother and I would take the red wagon and go there to get gunny sacks full of sawdust.  I would get to ride part way home on top of the sacks before he made me get off.  We also would cut through there to go fishing or to visit Husky Prue.  It was a sad day when the Preston Mill closed for good.  Never again were we to see those huge logs.  The Highpoint Mill had a very loud whistle like most, but this whistle we know is sitting in a house in Sequim, Washington.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

The salmon hatchery has provided everything from entertainment and education to jobs.  It used to have beautiful ponds on the backside.  They had waterwheels and tall yellow iris.  My grandpa worked there at one time.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

The high school boys often worked in the hay fields during the summer.  The farms of Issaquah were basically dairy and hay.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

We traveled to Seattle a couple of times a month.  We usually took the bus to get there.  Sometimes we had a doctor or dentist appointment and sometimes it was just for shopping.  Mornings always got me a buttterhorn and hot chocolate at Bartell’s.  Lunch sometimes was a hamburger and milk shake at the Copper Kitchen.  When I was sixteen I began working for a doctor in Seattle, still taking the bus.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

The construction of I-90 made it easier to get where you wanted.  No more going around through Renton.  Life was pretty big when we had our own four-lane.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

I didn’t buy my first car from any of these dealerships, but I do remember going in to get our flags for school patrol from Jerry Malone’s, which used to be the Hepler Dealership.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

Dances were held there though I was too small to attend.  I remember going to boxing matches when Pete Radamaker had his training camp here.  A paper article originating in Florida referred to Radamaker’s training camp as being in “Issaquah, an Indian encampment outside of Seattle.”

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

I remember attending wedding receptions in the Grange Hall.  As I remember, the floor was long and slick – good for dancing.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

My memories were mainly listening to memories of my dad and others.  I do remember getting to ride in the coal cars along Issaquah Creek.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

I saw 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, my favorite – Tammy, and many more.  Children’s admission was 25cents and a penny for the governor.  Adults admission was 50cents and two pennies for the governor.  I was always too scared to go to the back upper corner, but we always kept an eye on it to see who did go!

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

As a child I attended St. Joseph’s Catholic Church.  I remember the choir loft and the lady with the big bun on her head.  I remember my grandmother being wheeled in on a stretcher to attend a wedding, and most of all, I remember on Easter morning when I lost the button on my new white fuzzy coat.  I could see it, but couldn’t reach it until it was time to kneel.  What an experience!  When I was thirteen, I went to the brand-new in town Our Savior Lutheran Church.  We met at the old Issaquah Theater.  One Sunday, Pastor Collard was a little too long winded.  His three year old son who had been so patient had had enough.  At one of the responses, Paul replied “Amen Daddy, Amen!”  It gave a chuckle to the congregation and a gentle reminder to Pastor Collard.

Back to the Memory Books

Viola White Petersen

Vi White Petersen (left) and Tommy Jacobson, 1937

Vi White Petersen (left) and Tommy Jacobson, 1937

Name: Viola White Petersen

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

Most of my life – from toddler to old age.

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Issaquah Grade School, Issaquah High School

 

Family History in Issaquah:

Maternal grandparents settled here during the 1920’s.

If truth be known, my true name is Helia Viola Reini White Petersen

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

During the forties, there were approximately 200 students in the four classes attending the old “high school on the hilltop.”  On sunny days, groups of students would sit out on the lawn while they ate their lunch and the streets downtown were full of school kids buying a coke or candy bar at lunchtime.

Life was pretty simple.  School plays and dances were big events for us.  The Girls Club had functions such as a Mothers Day tea with a style show featuring fashions made in the Home Ec class, and the “annual smoker” was put on by the Boys Club.  The boys’ teams competed in the Lakeside League, and in the fall of 1943 were league football champions.  The girls played intra-mural volleyball, basketball and softball.

A tragic accident happened in the fall of 1941, when “Ike” Dilley, Class of “1942″, suffered a paralyzing injury during a practice football scrimmage, and succumbed Christmas week.  Of course, the whole school mourned.

Not very many of us had cars, or could even drive, and with gas rationing during the war years, it was special when one of your friends “got the car.”

A lot of us worked after school to earn our spending money.  I worked at the dime store.  Some of the older boys went to school during the day and worked nights at places like the shipyard.  As the war went on, more and more young men quit school to join the service.  Some teachers joined up, too.

George Morgan, football coach, was certainly memorable.  Kirkland High School was our bitter enemy, because their student body had grown so much bigger than any of the rest of the schools in the conference, due to the wartime shipyard there.  Mr. Morgan gave the speech of his life at the pep assembly saying; “the bigger they are, the harder they fall,” and our inspired football team beat them!  Mr. Seaman, English, was a terrific pianist who played on Muzzy Marcellino’s hit record “I’m Not Asleep, I’m Just Dreaming.”  Miss. Tarr, Biology, was beautiful and wowed the student body with her singing.  Miss Hunt, Typing, was memorable for the number of trips she made down the hall gravitating towards Mr. Frohs’ classroom.  She joined the WAVEs, and we later heard that she had broken a bone falling out of her bunk.

Forty-four of us graduated June 1, 1944, wearing white formal dresses and suits.  Not too long after, a group of us wore them again to the Olympic Ballroom in Seattle, where we had a going-away party for some of the boys entering the service.  We pooled our money, and eight of us split a bottle of champagne.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

My only connection with Minnie Schomber was through Camp Fire.  I believe she started Issaquah’s first group.  She was an honored guest at our Grand Council Fire in the 1960s.

Miss Alice Armstrong, our 6th grade teacher, was my all-time favorite because she was such a warm, fun-loving person.  She started Camp Fire Girls in Issaquah again during the 1940s.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

No problem in 1949.  I was pregnant, preparing for a baby shower at Marilyn (Bush) Foley’s place in North Bend and we both ran out of the house to check on the fallen chimney, forgetting, for the moment, that little Dick was still in the house.

No problem in 1965 either, but I got all shook up in the shakiest building at the Renton Boeing plant.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

George Reini, my uncle, was involved with the town football team in the thirties, and I sold tickets at the gate for many of the games.

I appeared in several high school plays, and played the leading role in “Here Comes Charlie,” our Junior Class Play.  (In the fall of 1944, Bruce Barlow and I were drama majors at the U of W.  My freshman year was my last at the U, but Bruce graduated and went on to a career in the theater.)

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Well, I read a lot and collected stamps.  Friday night movies at the Issaquah Theatre were a regular thing.  Walen’s field, behind our neighborhood, was where we played games like baseball and “run sheep run.”  In the summertime, we’d swim in the Issaquah Creek there, too.  Punky Watkins used to catch crawdads and try to cook them, much to my disgust.

My Uncle George and I listened to all of the Rainier baseball games on a big, old Philco radio in the front room, and he took me to one of their games at Sick Stadium in Seattle.  I was a big fan of all of the radio shows like “I Love a Mystery,” “Amos and Andy,” and “The Shadow.”

Now and then, we did skip school and catch the early bus to Seattle to wander the streets and go to a movie.  Those were the days of Alice Faye movies, and girls “swooning” over Frank Sinatra.  Some of my partners in crime were Clark Darst, Alfie Sutter, Bruce Barlow, Marilyn Bush, and Elmer Watson.

The only time I can remember getting into trouble for skipping school was one time when students were ordered not to attend a football game in Bothell, due to gas rationing.  Rex Seil was home on leave from the Navy, and his sister, Mabel, and I rode to the game with him anyway.  Of course we were seen and were called into Mr. Mykland’s office the next day to be reprimanded.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Bookter’s Bakery, where I worked one summer, was between the Log Tavern and the Grand Central Hotel on Sunset.  As I remember, the dime store started in that building, and, later Fasanos opened their restaurant there.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Axel Johnson, whose shop was connected to the H & H Tavern, plus Paul Benson and Dave Lewis on Sunset, were popular barbers of the 40’s.

Visits to a beauty shop were few and far between, but getting hooked up to that electrical monster called a permanent-wave machine wasn’t comfortable, nor was it a pretty sight!

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Between the Lewis and Wold Hardware stores, they had just about every kind of hardware, sporting goods, or home maintenance supplies you needed.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

There were a lot of grocery stores in town; Barney White’s, Moneysavers, and the Red and White.  We bought most of our groceries at Tony and Johnnie’s Corner Market.  I can remember the wooden barrel filled with lutefisk in front of the store.  They were both friends of my Uncle George’s, so they kidded me a lot.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

We had a frozen food locker there in later years.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

Gert Chevalier’s Bizzy Bee Café was a popular place to eat.

 

My favorite soda shop was the Honeysuckle.  Mr. Drylie was such a character; he always wore the tip of his tie tucked into his shirtfront, military style.  He served the best lemon phosphates, green rivers, cherry cokes, tulip sundaes and milkshakes you’ve ever tasted.  He sold candy too, and had his own lending library.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Divinity has always been our favorite candy, but those Victoria Creams were special too.  I’ll always remember Julius Boehm teaching swimming lessons to the kids.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

My husband would surely say that the Union Tavern was his favorite “saloon,” and Marge Doherty his favorite barmaid.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

We’re long-time members of the co-op, and they delivered heating oil to us for years.

 

Local Politics

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

I was too young to remember her, but I’ve been told that she lived here in our house at one time.

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

Ordinance No. 752?  I always thought the street names were changed every time some “new guy” got on the city council.  The sewer used to be at the end of our street, so we always called it Sewer Avenue, even though we actually lived at the corner of Jones and Cooper.  Later, another “new guy” decided that it would be better for our streets to be renames 12th Avenue North and Alder.  When we finally got used to those names, a new “new guy,” who was probably a friend of the “not-so-new guy,” came up with the brilliant idea to rename the streets again, so we now reside at 1st Avenue Northwest and Northwest Alder Place, never having moved!

Pity the stranger who comes into town and asks for help looking for an address, because I believe very few citizens know the current street names, except for the ones in their own neighborhood.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

I’m sure that my grandparents felt the hardship, but I didn’t know the difference.  The fish stew we ate was probably made with salmon poached from the creek, and we were able to eat “filia” every morning for breakfast because Jake Dorman brought us milk, thick with cream, from his Pine lake farm.

The thing that I didn’t have, and coveted most, was a bicycle.  Helia Huovar broke my heart when she wouldn’t let Alan lend me his bike anymore, probably because I asked for it too many times.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

High School students were excused from class to man the aircraft warning tower on top of the Fire Hall.  I remember blackouts, shortages, war bonds, rationing, and classmates quitting school to enter the service.

After graduation from high school, I got a job as a mechanic at Boeing Aircraft.  There were lots of women working in war plants but, considering my mechanical skills and for the good of the country, that fall I left to go to school at the U of W.

People on the home front corresponded with loved ones and friends in the service; sending care packages filled with toiletries, cookies, hand-knit scarves, etc., and writing lots of letters.  The letters from overseas were called V-Mails, smaller and weighing less.

Just about every able-bodied man was in the service.  Families proudly displayed a blue star in their window to show that a son, daughter, or husband was in the service.  Sad to say, a gold star meant that the serviceman had been killed in action.

We were fortunate that more servicemen and women from our town weren’t killed in action.  The Class of 1944 lost Joe Tondreau, a star athlete, and my husband lost his brother.  Louis Petersen, Class of 1936, over Belgium.  They were just two of the many that we lost from this area.

During those war years, we can remember with great pride the patriotic spirit that flowed throughout our country.

 

How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah?  Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?

We had only one Japanese family in the area, the Kobukatas, with three children, Yuri, Ken and Ume, attending Issaquah High School at the time.  All of them were well liked, sharp as a whip and school leaders.  Yuri was editor of the 1941 Sammamish, and I always thought that Ume could very well have been valedictorian of our class.  It must have been a terrible thing for them to be told they must leave everything and go to internment camps, because I believe they considered themselves Americans.  As a matter of fact, Ken fought with the U.S. Army in Italy.

It was our loss as well as theirs.  It’s heartening to know that they have done well with their lives elsewhere.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

In the thirties, every kid got a dime reward for being in the parade.  Then there were all sorts of races in the ballpark, and if you were fast enough, you could win more dimes.  Of course, the carnival had come to town and they were very happy to see you spending your dimes on their rides.

The parade grew bigger and better in later years.  The Labor Day Queen earned the title by selling the most raffle tickets, and our next-door neighbor, Bev Wright, won one year, so she and her court rode on their special float.  The high school band usually played, and various marching units would come every year.  The Eagles’ hillbilly band was always a big hit.

They still had some fun contests in the ballpark.  One year, my husband, Jerry, won the “greased pig” contest, and, farm boy that he is raised it for meat.

The big dance was at the VFD hall, with Les LaBrie and Bonnie Guitar playing many times.

Sorry, but Salmon Days is too big for me.  Too many people.  Too many dogs.  Too many booths.  Too expensive.  To tell the truth, the only thing that might tempt me to fight my way through the crowd is for one of Boehm’s Dilly Bars, but that line’s probably too long, anyway.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

Our family had a great time at kiddies parades during the 1950’s when the kids had floats decorated as “The King and I,” “Fiesta in Italy,” and “1890 Duryea.”  It was a lot of fun for all of us, but now I rarely go downtown to watch the parade.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

It’s gone from small-town friendliness to big-time mobs.

 

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

I don’t remember a rodeo, but I vaguely recall motorcycles racing through rings of fire in the ballpark.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

In the spring, the kids in our neighborhood, usually led by Ethylmarie Watkins, with Punky, Cappy and me in tow, and anyone else who wanted to come, picked trilliums in the woods across from what is now Issaquah Valley Elementary.  Sometimes I’d hike with school friends up to Round Lake and Lake Tradition, but the big question was, do we dare walk the trestle?

The fishing derby was lots of fun for kids like my son, and he still loves to fish.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Originally, Pinko Brolio and Earl Paulsen used the VFD hall for roller-skating, but later they moved down to Vasa Park.  The Swedes still had their Midsummer Festival there, but the hall became Lakeview Skating Rink for many years, the name changing to Vasa Roller Rink by 1944.

It was very popular, but a lot harder to get there.  Earl would pick kids up on his way through town, but you had to be there when he came by, or no skating that night.  Everyone had to ride back to town with him, too.  One time he had twelve kids packed in the car.

The rink joined the RSROA, which had certain skating standards, and some of the younger, talented skaters were entering competitions.  Shoe skates had wooden wheels in those days, and we’d glide around and around to Laverne Little’s beautiful music on the Hammond organ.

It was a lot of fun for couples to skate the circle waltz and other dances.  There were never enough skating partners to go around during the war, so lots of times I found myself skating the fella’s part, and I have the scars to prove it.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

I didn’t get to go to the lake very much (it was that car thing again), but I do remember Red Cross swim lessons at Alexander’s Beach one summer.  My Uncle George (Reini) was the instructor and town kids rode to the park in the back of a big, old truck for lessons.

Oh, do I remember skating at Horrock’s Pond!  I borrowed some skates to try ice- skating for the first time, but, unfortunately, Bruce Barlow and I fell through the ice.  Luckily the pond wasn’t very deep, so we were able to get out okay.  I was afraid to tell my grandma, so when, I got home, I hid my wet clothes.  I do believe that my cousin Janis squealed on me, because my grandma met me the next day at lunch, in front of The Honeysuckle, and read me the riot act.

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

My husband’s family owned Petersen Brothers, a large logging company in the area during the twenties.  At one time they owned fifteen miles of track, two locomotives and logged large, old growth timber with steam logging machines.

I’m sure that in the early years, my grandfather, Matt Reini, and Uncle Louie worked in the woods, too.

 

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

During the forties, my husband and his father, Louis E. Petersen, contract logged many years for Preston Mill.  They also sold logs to Red Hall and the High Point Mill.

The Petersens were an old-time logging family living at Coalfield.  In fact, my husband was only fourteen years old when he learned to high climb.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

Going to Seattle was a long trip through Renton, but every Decoration Day, my grandma Reini and I rode the bus to Seattle to decorate my mother and Aunt Helia’s graves at Mount Pleasant Cemetery on Queen Anne Hill.  The day before, we picked flowers from our yard, keeping them fresh in a tub of water overnight.  The next morning w wrapped them in newspapers and took them with us on the bus to Seattle.

The route it took was via the Sunset Highway, through Renton, and then followed Empire Way to Rainier into town.  We had to transfer to a Queen Anne bus, which took us up to the graveyard, where we covered the two graves with the flowers we’d brought.  We reversed the sequence to go home, so it was a long day.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

Who would have thought how our lovely, peaceful valley would be so drastically changed by one little floating bridge and a highway?  Droves of people have come, and our little town is lost forever.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

Our first car was a used 1930 model A coupe, which cost a total of $60.00.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I was a Rainbow Girl for a couple of years.  My grandfather was a member of the Oddfellow’s Lodge and The Finnish National Club.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

My Camp Fire Girls earned money for a trip by selling hamburgers and home-baked goodies when the club had their turkey shoots.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

We went to many Saturday night dances, the annual men’s and women’s bowling league parties, and roller-skating at the Fire Hall.

It was a lot of fun during the sixties when the Couples Club got together at the Grange Hall every month for cocktails, dinner and dancing.  Each month’s committee planned the theme, decorations, food, did the clean up, and everyone had a good time.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

My grandpa Reini worked in the mines, and spent many years in the sanitarium at Georgetown with “black lung.”

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

The Brunsbergs owned the theater and movies cost a dime.  “Mama” (my grandmother) seemed to always have a dime for me, so I went to a movie almost every Friday night.  One time she came with me and we saw a Gene Autry movie.  She really liked to hear him sing “South of the Border.”  I can remember the newsreels, serials, and singing along to the bouncing ball.

When  “Gone With the Wind” came to our theater, the price had gone up, but I went to a special showing about 9 a.m. one Saturday, and spent the whole morning watching the movie.  Then I walked up to Drylie’s, checked out the book, and took it home to read.  That was a GWTW marathon.

 

Front Street

I used to be able to close my eyes and name the old Front Street Businesses, but those memories are fading.

I remember, though, that Ai Garner was always good for a wiener at Fischer’s.

Mr. Cussac had a musty, old shoe store and lived upstairs over the store with his wife and White Bull Terrier dogs.  He taught baton twirling.  One time he dressed up for a parade as a majorette, strutting and twirling his way down the street.  He was great!

Miss. Eaves had a dress shop, which she sold to Doreen Dalbotten and Maxine Maulsby.  It was renamed DorMax, and I worked there in 1946.  The two sisters and their mother, Mrs. Gregg, were always good to me.

Pretty much all through high school, I worked after-school at the Issaquah 10 Cent Store owned by the Maulsbys.  Maxine never did find out that Midge Spagel and I soaped the store windows one Halloween.  I felt guilty when she cleaned them the next day, but not guilty enough to ‘fess up.

The Morgans lived upstairs over the old bank, in an apartment next to the telephone office.  Annie Morgan and Suzie Krall were the telephone operators.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

I went to Sunday School at the Issaquah Baptist Church in its old location behind the Alpine Dairy plant (now Darigold).  It’s a small world, but in recent years we’ve become friends with Ed Doty from California, who, it turns out, is Pastor Umberger’s grandson.

 

Additional Memories:

My claim to fame is that I’ve outlived everybody in this neighborhood.  The old neighbors are all gone.

The Watkins family lived across the street to the south, and they were a lively bunch.  Ethylmarie treated me like a little sister.  They had more money than we did, because they always looked like fashion plates on Easter Sunday.  I think Punky and Cappy were the only kids in the neighborhood to have fireworks for the Fourth of July; luckily, we got to watch the show.

The Johnsons lived right next door.  Bill Johnson used to tease me with ditties such as “Viola bumbola teealagafola teelegged toelegged bowlegged Viola.”

The Chalfas lived across the street to the east.  Jack was in my class.  The twins, Donna and Dulcie, ushered at the theatre.

The Talus family lived kitty-corner from us, and their buildings covered the north end of the block.  Sometimes mama took me over to use their sauna.

Years later, Ross and Saima (Talus) Wright lived in the Johnson house next door, and we became good friends.  Saima and I were card-playing buddies.

 

OUR HOUSE AND FAMILY:

Tour guides used to show our house to people during their historic house tours, because it’s supposed to be one of the oldest houses in Issaquah.  Unfortunately, it no longer looks the same, because there’s very little left of the original house, unless you count the square nails in the attic and center ridge.

My maternal grandparents were Matt and Matilda Reini.  I don’t know when the Reini family first came to Issaquah, but, judging by school records, they were here from 1920-1924.  I believe they moved away for a time, returned, and moved into this house in 1926.  The family has lived here ever since.

The Reinis came from Finland, and neither one of them was able to speak or write much English.  They had many friends in the Finnish community.  Of course, Finnish was spoken at home and, in my younger days, I was able to speak it a little, and could even read some of the Finnish newspaper.

I spent a lot of time with my grandparents as a toddler, but moved to my mother’s in Seattle to start school.  When my mother, Miriam, only 26 years old, died in 1936, I moved here for good.

It seems like my grandpa was in the sanitarium in Georgetown most of the time after I moved here.  He did come home for a short time, and when he tried to talk to me in Finn, I’m ashamed to say that I insisted he speak English to me.  This was during the war, and I used patriotism as my excuse, but I regret it to this day.  He died in 1944.

Because my mother died so young, my grandmother became “mama” to me, and I loved her dearly.  She died in 1950.

Jerry Petersen and I were married in 1946 and we’ve lived in this house most of our married life.

I graduated from Issaquah High School in 1944 and Jerry in 1943.  All of our children went to school here; David (66), Dana (67), Darcy (72), and Dara (75).

CLASS OF 1944…..Do You Remember?

We were born before television, before penicillin, before polio shots, frozen dinners, Xerox, plastic, contact lenses, Frisbees, and the pill.  We were before radar, credit cards, split atoms, laser beams, ball point pens, before pantyhose, dishwashers, clothes dryers, electric blankets, air conditioners, drip-dry clothes, and before man walked on the moon.  We got married first and then lived together.  How quaint can you be?

In our time, closets were for clothes, not for “coming out of.”  Bunnies were small rabbits and rabbits were not Volkswagens.  Designer jeans were scheming girls named Jean, and having a meaningful relationship meant getting along well with a family member.

We though fast food was what you ate during Lent, and Outer Space was the school playground.  We were before house-husbands, gay rights, dual careers, and commuter marriages.  We were before day-care centers, group therapy, and nursing homes.  We never heard of FM radio, tape decks, CDs, electric typewriters, artificial hearts, yogurt, and guys wearing earrings.  For us, time-sharing meant togetherness, not sharing vacation time in a condominium, and whoever heard of a condo either?  We were before word processors or computer dating; a chip meant a piece of food; hardware meant hardware and software wasn’t even a word.

In 1944 the term “making out” referred to how you did on your exam.  Pizzas, McDonald’s, instant coffee and lattes were unheard of.  We hit the scene when there were 5 and 10 cent stores, where you bought things for 5 and 10 cents.  The Honeysuckle sold ice cream cones for a nickel or a dime (one scoop or two?).  For one nickel you could ride a Seattle street car, make a phone call, buy a Pepsi, or enough stamps to mail one letter or two postcards.  You could buy a new Chevy coupe for $600.00, but who could afford one, a pity too, because gas was 11 cents a gallon!

In our day, cigarette smoking was fashionable; “grass” was mowed, “coke” was a cold drink, and “pot” was something you cooked in.  “Rock” music was a grandma’s lullaby, and “aids” were helpers in the principal’s office.

We were certainly not before the differences between the sexes was discovered, but we were surely before the sex change; we made do with what we had.  And, we were the last generation that was so dumb we actually thought you needed a husband to have a baby!

No wonder we are so confused, and there is such a generation gap today…but we survived!  What better reason to celebrate.

(This is not an original piece, but we copied and revised it a little for 50th class reunion.)

AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)  

Viola Petersen   March 31, 2001

Meindert Pillie

Name: Pillie, Meindert

Education — Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

I started freshman year 1930 in the old grade school building. The 2nd year was in the new high school; the site is where the Boehm Swimming Pool is currently located. We now had a study hall & lots of normal homework was done here. I feel the teacher who influenced the most was the manual training instructor Lawrence Jenson. His wood working class was about the only such program, unless the boys took up dressmaking-cooking classes.

See annual for 1931, pg. 12, for picture of old grade school.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Another famous teacher was English teacher James Stevens. This strong, burly red head soon let the “would-be trouble makers” know what it was like to lifted up “by the hair” and put in their place.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

No, just working on my job to help make money for the additional taxes req’d for repairs.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

None, we lived some 3 miles from school, on a hard working farm, & with no transportation to school, we got our “work outs” at home.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Sorry to say, “free time” does not come easy when you are into farm life.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Stevenson Drug Store, on e-side of Front Street, about the location of a present…

At end of month, any magazines, like Popular Mechanics & Popular Science, would be replaced by new issues. Only the front covers of the old magazines were sent to publishers & I could get the whole rest of last month’s magazine for free.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

None. Haircuts were a “benefit” of “farm life.”

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Fishing gear & trapping licenses. I liked the numerous cabinets on the walls & the “rolling” ladder that was used to get to the upper compartments.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Mostly, our main “staple” items were obtained at N. Renton’s “Johnson Grocery” where we traded homegrown potatoes for a few necessary “staple goods.” Remember, this was a period of severe depression & the “barter-trade” method was widely used by our family. Our total “milk check” just took care of the rent for the farm.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

Yes, later [we purchased things at the Grange]. Mostly the basics, & later, (1945 or so) when I returned to the Issaquah Valley with my own family, & we did have a frozen food locker then. Home freezers had not yet arrived on the scene.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

The Triple “X” occasionally. When we went to Renton Jr. High, about 1828-1930, one of our classmates was Joel Rutherford, & it was this young man’s “branching out” of the Renton original root beer shop near crossroads of Renton’s Third Avenue & Rainier Way, that eventually became known as the “Triple X” & and became a nationwide chain. Only Issaquah’s “Triple X” sign is now a survivor & in spite of efforts to “rid the town” of its famous “barrel” sign, the local protestors of this famous sign now would like to think they created this “historical landmark.”

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Yes, & make it dark chocolates.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

None.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

A good place to get tools & fuel oil-gasoline from the bulk delivery truck. My membership with them goes back to the early 1940s.

 

What do you recall about Lawwil’s drug store?

None.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

Please don’t get me started on this. Too many blundering episodes would be brought out & some are still occurring today. No use embarrassing people still living here.

 

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

None.

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

No comments.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

It was during my high school days of 1930-1934, & later, after graduation, it was a choice, either go to the federal “CCC” camp program ($30.00 per month) or stay home & get all of $1.00 per day. So why go to camp when I made the same money as a “CCC” man who had to send $25.00 of his monthly earnings home?

Eating – on a farm, it meant raising your own chickens, other meat like pork & beef, & for spending money to go to an occasional movie in Issaquah, I trapped muskrats on S. end of Lk. Sammamish, stayed home on weekends to “try to sell” live eels to local fishermen. These “rock eels” were in local streams & good bait for bass fishing. If we weren’t too tired, we got occasional “fill in jobs” at neighbors’ farms. No one today knows what a real depression is.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

In 1936, my parents moved from the Issaquah Valley, leaving the John Barlow Farm on the SW end of Lk. Sammamish. We ended up at Orillia, just north of Kent. When the draft system started, I had to sign up & I got a “winning number,” so soon that I was into the Army before the war started. Yes, I got an early start in the Army, but at only $21.00 per month. Issaquah grew in this period, had an airstrip for training pilots.

 

How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah?  Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?

No.

 

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

Much ship building & aircraft manufacture. After med. discharge from the service, late 1943, I went back to work I had been drafted from, at Boeing Plant II. I went back onto test work on B-17s & later transferred to the “mock up” of new airplanes through the 767 program at Everett, WA, until retirement in Feb. 1981.

 

Issaquah Round-Up– Salmon Days– Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

Before Salmon Days, Labor Day had parades at least into the 1940s.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

No.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

Over time, the Salmon Days “business” booths have taken over the streets of Issaquah & many local residents are trapped in the area with no easy access to their homes. Only the city coffers benefit from the “permits to open a booth” in this period. Many local residents “escape” for a couple of days.

 

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

None.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

In the 1930s, logging was still a major industry, virgin timber was cut at Round Lake (this was on hill just E. of present high school). Small mines were common, the huge slag dump S. of Issaquah was still burning, as well as at Bianco Mine on Old Highway 10, & these mines (Harris Mine included) were “truck-out” mines & tailings went down Tibbetts Creek & formed a big delta in Lk. Sammamish. This was before I-90 cut the valley in half, as present culverts under I-90 would not be able to handle the flow that existed then. Another mine on old Sunset Highway 10 (now I-90) was the Grand Ridge Mine just about one-half mile from the N.P. trestle that was just east of town. Much water came out of the ground from deep within the Grand Ridge Plateau, but with the projects going on this plateau today, the water table has lowered & no water escapes through the old mine shaft. In early 1920s, I would visit the Wickstrop Farm, which was just east & north of the Bergsma Farm, & mount a telescope on a tripod to watch the logging operation on Tiger Mountain, near the summit. These railroad operations served the mill at Hobart. Later, truck logging (1930s) took over & the slope on north side of Tiger Mountain was logged, including areas south of Lake Tradition.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Yes, lots of time outside, but working time. Living on the S. shore of Lk. Sammamish, I did do a lot of fishing in the lake for mainly bass. A choice spot was in a cove just north of the present state park, in an area of the present state park boat ramp. This cove had lots of log storage that came about when the Sammamish Plateau was logged off & a logging train came off the hill & logs dumped into the lake just about a half mile west of old Alexander Beach. These logs went to the mill at Monohon & to my favorite bass fishing under the storage area.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

Bass – perch – catfish in Lk. Sammamish. No trout out of Issaquah Creek. But I have seen & filmed (16 mm) Kokanee (a landlocked salmon) which came into Issaquah Creek & it was like a red tide of these trout. They are almost extinct today. Hunting was good for ducks, but I never got a Canadian honker, they were wild & one could never get close to them. The geese always were in the middle of a big field & had “lookouts” posted & if they saw you, they took off for the middle of the lake, & soon resumed their migratory flight.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

My Vasa Park memories are: sneaking into the weekend picnics, partaking of them, winning some of the events, then it was back to our ditched bicycles & it was “back to work.” (Cows don’t have free days, & neither did I.)

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Yes, Lk. Sammamish & ice skating on Pine Lake, which I also got 16 mm B&W footage of. [No ice skating at Horrock’s]

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

I got into this subject earlier (p. 16). I did not work at logging, many of my friends did, & starting in 1936, I always had my 16 mm Bell & Howell camera with me. In those days, most of work in woods was by hand before chain saws came along. The woods were logged off & yarded in by spar trees & steam donkeys. The logs went out by truck. A far cry from today’s logging operations. The trees generally were virgin timber & many one-log loads were common.

 

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

All of the above.

Monohon Mill water pumps, at night, would run to fill up a reservoir on the hill above.

The High Point Mill site was wiped out by the high washout from Tiger Mountain in the 1930s.

The Issaquah Lumber Mill at Front St. at present site of fish hatchery ponds, was only cutting alder in the 1930s.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

Yes. Yes. No.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

It brings in lots of tourists, provides work for a few, the end product swims away & hopefully, some will return to Issaquah, if they escape the heavy toll of the fish nets in the ocean.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

1930-1936, dairy farming on the John Barlow Farm, at south end of Lk. Sammamish. While we lived there, West Lake Sammamish Road was paved. This closed the road – period – for all traffic (except our bicycles) & the Monohon Mill tug boat took our milk cans from a dock to Hans Jensen’s Farm, & the Issaquah Auto Freight came to pick up the milk. The Castagno boys, Bill & Johnny, usually drove the trucks.

 

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

Only that I tried to get a shot at the wild geese, but never succeeded.

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

No.

 

Railroad– Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

No. In 1927, my parents got their first car, & most of our trips were to Renton, where they had farmed prior to coming to Issaquah Valley in 1930. If we wanted to go into Seattle, we took the Interurban Trolley to Renton Junction & on into Seattle. A few times we took the Rainier Valley Street Car from Renton to Seattle, along the west shore of Lk. Washington. It was slowest train.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

It divided the valley into 2 zip codes, it cut up the existing farms, it started a spiral of tax increases, it causes the rapid development of shopping areas, it increased the qty. of stop lights from 1 at the corner of Front Street & Sunset (this light was a real history maker), it put Issaquah on the map. Now the stoplights are going in faster than I can count them.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

In 1937, my first car was bought from Renton’s Clark Bros. Ford Agency for all of $700 – new.

 

Fraternal Organizations– Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

None.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

None.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

None.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

Special occasions not many of them, only if some one had a special occasion reception.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

No, but many of my friends did.

 

What were the working conditions like in the mine? Which mine did you work for, and what was your job?

None.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Not too many movies at the old movie house. In 1930-1936, our only available transportation was by bicycle, 3 miles to go. At this time Highway 10 was used from Goode’s Corner into Issaquah. Not much traffic in those days. Being dark, if a car came toward us, we would turn on a flashlight. This Highway 10 was the main transcontinental highway, & at times we might meet about 6 vehicles. Movies, I think, were about 25¢ to get in, all black & white films.

No [I did not ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss].

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

This Issaquah Community Baptists church, starting about 1945 & the church was just west of today’s creamery.

In 1966, a new church was built just west of the fish hatchery, up on the hill, now called the Issaquah Community Church. Our first service was a year and a half later. Our pastor was Russ Hendrickson, & a hard worker on the volunteer crew that built this church.

Fred Lind’s Preston Mill furnished much of the lumber used for this new church.

 

Additional Memories

The historical society knows of my hobby of photography. Since 1936, I have accumulated thousands of feet of 16 mm films. My main “dear to my heart subjects” are (not in order of my priority):

X Logging

X Railroading

X Farming

35 years of first flights of Boeing aircraft

X The way the valley was

X The controversial E. Lk. Sammamish Trail & rail removal

 

Dozens of reels on trips around the U.S., Alaska, Canada, Holland, Switzerland.

Above subjects being taped by me for viewing when I get these converted to video. This is the real time consumer.

P.S. The above marked X are on S-VHS video, but require editing & narration.

June Day Sandberg

Name:June Day Sandberg

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

From 1928 to 1939.

Later during World War II with my folks.

 

Family History in Issaquah:

My great uncle, Frank Day, was the first Treasurer of Issaquah in the 1920’s.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

Years 1938 and 1939:

Lots of good friends, many of which I still have from grade school and all.

I graduated from Renton High in 1941.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

I remember Minnie from grade school years and on!  She was “quite” a lady!!

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

My son, Ray Sandberg, was affected in 1965!  He was on the second floor in English class sitting by a window.  He had a few cuts on his face and hands; nothing serious.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

My husband, Arne Sandberg, is in this picture somewhere.  We couldn’t pick him out.  We have a bigger picture of this; “really” enjoy it.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

We mostly had chores to do at home.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Charlie Kinnune’s Shoe Repair.  They lived in the shop.  I baby-sat their three kids.

Jacobsen’s Bakery.  Very good.  Their daughter, Annamarie (Tootsie), was one of my pals.

Finney and Fischer’s Meat markets.

Peters Real Estate.

Eaves Dress Shop.

Cussac Shoe Store.

Drylie’s Soda Shop.  These were all on Front Street.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Paul Benson’s Barber Shop.  My grandson, Eric Hansen, was the fifth generation of our family to have Paul cut his hair.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

We still shop at Lewis Hardware!  What a great old store.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Red and White Store on Sunset Way owned by Mickey Miles.  Still very good friends with his son Leonard (Chubby to us!).

Later at Stevens Grocery on front Street.  Also Tony and Johnnie’s.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

We had a frozen food locker at The Grange.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

We weren’t living in Issaquah after the war.  Before the war we always went to Dave Morgan’s Little Barrel way up Sunset close to Flintoft’s.  Depression time if we’d bring our own bananas he’d make us splits!!  We loved it as kids.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Yes.  We liked many kinds of their candies.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

We’re not into beer.  My dad, Frank Day, always went to Charlie Clark’s.  Later the Union tavern that Bill and Margie ran.

 

Local Politics

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

I was “really” unhappy when they changed “White” Street in front of our house.  Our house was on the street behind Fischer’s Meats.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

I was mostly in grade and high school.  Did a “lot” of baby-sitting!!

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

My husband, Arne, was on Okinawa at end of war, ready to invade Japan.  Thank God for Truman and The Bomb.

 

How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah?  Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?

Our friends, Yuri Kobukata and Mary Nagasawa, were affected.  Yuri came from back east for our class of 1941 reunion.  It was so good to see her.

 

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

I was living with my mom, Alberta Beardmore, and worked at the Busy-Bee for May Harris.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

We fished in the creek.  My mom was the “best” fisherman in town!  Guys used to come see how many she caught.  She was always out-fishing them!!

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Swedish picnics.

Skating Rink.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

We used to walk (hike) up to Pine Lake and stay all day.  Mom used to take a bunch of us kids down the railroad tracks to Sunset Grove (now the state park).

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

It is wonderful for the town!  I remember watching them build it!

 

Farming and Dairy

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

Since my early grade school days Rob and Will were in my class.  They’re still our best of friends.

 

Railroad—Transportation

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

It “wrecked” our valley; changed our little town forever!!

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

Arne belonged to the Masons and Elks, also VFW.

I belonged to the Rainbow Girls.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

VFW meetings.

Some dances.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

When we could save ten cents we went to the movies during the Depression.

AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)

June Day Sandberg              March 21, 2001

Evelyn Evans Donlan Schall

 Name:Evelyn Evans Donlan Schall

Birth Date or Year (optional): 

September 8, 1919

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

Dan and I moved to Issaquah about six months after our marriage.  Dan’s mom had developed diabetes in her 70’s, her vision was bad and she couldn’t give herself shots and housework needed to be done.

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

Dan’s hometown.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

I stayed after Dan’s death for sometime.  When I moved I remarried and after Tony died I eventually moved back to the Renton area.

 

Family History in Issaquah:

Tim Young also graduated from Issaquah High.  I raised most of my children here.  Lived in the old Day house.  Then bought the Boydon house and moved there.  Dan and our five children all graduated from Issaquah High.  Danella Donlan still lives her on the Lake McDonald and Leonard??????????????????house.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

My husband, Dan Donlan, should be here to fill this out.  His favorite class and teacher was his shop teacher.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Minnie Schomber was a neighbor of mine.  I remember Neal Chevalier picking just the tops of her flowers.  He really got a hard scolding from her for that.  In later years quite a crabby lady.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

Scared silly as my children were at school in 1965.  In the 1949 earthquake Cheryl and Danella were playing out in their sandbox.  I couldn’t get down my back steps to go to them.  When it stopped, Danella said: “Mommy something shaked my bottom.”

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

I remember a little store for women.  The Lady who ran it was called Miss Eaves.  Her store was tiny but packed full.  I used to take my mother-in-law, Ann, there.  Grandma was almost 6’ tall and a big woman but not fat.  Miss Eaves carried corsets and things that fit Grandma Donlan.

Also shopped at Harry Steven’s Grocery.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Pageboys were one of the popular styles.  It was the style I had at that time.  Can’t remember the name of the shop.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Dan used to love to go to Lewis Hardware.  He said Tom had everything you could want.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

I used to go to Harry Steven’s store a lot.  Also to Tony and Johnny’s.  I walked with my two little girls, Cheryl and Danella.  So I had to shop and carry my stuff home.  We only had one car then.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

I used to shop there for groceries and yes we had, as a rule, two lockers as Dan kept stock on the old Donlan Farm.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

Sometimes I would take the girls to the Honeysuckle for Ice Cream or a Cola.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

I rarely went to Boehm’s.  We only had one car and Dan took it to work at Boeings.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

I used to drive in to pick up Grandpa Donlan as he had walked one mile in earlier.  He would be at the tavern that George Stonebridge owned.  George also told me to leave the tavern as he thought I was too young.  But I was 26 then.  I believe it was the Eagle Tavern.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

We were members and bought farm thing there.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I have a few old pictures of Dan’s parents and Dan and brother, Joe.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

My husband, Dan, was a fireman and we attended lots of parties and dances.  Also, I think, it was during the Holiday Season, I was cooking a turkey.  Went to visit Phyllis Chevalier and the fire siren rang.  My turkey was gone, too roasted.  So we had dinner at Phyllis and Joe’s.

Still so close to Phyllis, in 2001 we spend at least one afternoon a week together.  This February 22 she was 75.  I missed her party at daughter Linda’s as was in Ellensburg at Maureen and Buck’s lovely home.  Len also has a house and acreage across the street from them.  Len has a new toy.  He took us all for a ride on the “bike” up the hill where we saw lots of deer.  Was a wonderful weekend with Buck, Mae, Roy and Len and Levin popping in.

My 80th birthday was so special.  My family rented the hall at the train station and I had a lovely party.  So many friends showed up and lots of Issaquah friends.

Dan was born July 30,1918.  He died of a heart attack December 31, 1974, leaving wife Evelyn, daughters Cheryl, Danella and Maureen, sons Leonard and Larry, and nephew, Tim Young, who I had raised.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Yes, swimming in Lake Sammamish at the Flintofts.  Wonderful days and picnics too.  Because Tim wanted to go to Nate’s Lake place (next door to Flintofts) and he could not swim.  So I signed him up for a swim class in North Bend.  It was during the baseball season, which was a conflict, and he was so unhappy with me.  Happy now though as he and Paula have a lovely pool in Torrance, California at their home.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Picnic’s.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

We used to spend most of our days in the summers at Flintofts lake property.  Great swimming and Tom loved to push Cheryl and Danella off the dock.  Spent a lot of time with Bill and Alberta or one of them.  I felt I needed to be there if my kids were there.  Had lots of picnic’s there and we used to cook dinner and stay until it was dark.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

Very good for Issaquah, and still is.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

Dan’s parents, Michael and Ann Donlan, by car (Joe’s) or train.  They would go into Grandma Liddle’s and visit and shop.  Also before my time, the great grandparents of Michael and Ann lived in there and they visited them.  Also, Uncle Joe Donlan and his wife (Rose) lived in Seattle.  Also, Uncle George who worked for the Seattle Times.  Spent 50 some years working there.  Started his career at the Issaquah paper.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

Grandpa Michael Donlan worked in the mines.  Also later had a tavern, which his son Joe worked at.  Later sold to the Kiebers.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

St. Joseph’s Catholic Church.  Father Carey.

Almost every Sunday after mass he would come to Dan’s folks for a drink and breakfast.  He was short, Irish; he used to call me “Girl” which really irritated me.  He was a crabby old Irishman.

I helped do the 100th yearbook on the church.  Special meeting at the Issaquah High School, I was thanked for my help.  1896-1996 archbishop Thomas Murphy gave the homily.  About 800 people celebrated the mass at the Issaquah High gym.

First Catholic Mass in great granddad’s living room.  Father Dominez spent two days on horseback from Snohomish to get to Issaquah (1883) to serve mass.

Great-grandma Ann died at age 83 at son Joe’s home.  They had homesteaded the Donlan ranch.  Mother of Annie, Mamie, William, Michael and Joe (twins), and Peter and George.

 

Additional Memories

Grandma (March 20, 1875 – September 20, 1947) and Grandpa (November 20, 1872 – September 20, 1946) Donlan were married in Tacoma in 1872.  They both passed away in 1946 and 1947.

Joe was born in 1908 Issaquah died January 4, 1958.

Michael was born in 1912 Taylor died May 9, 1977.

Anne born in 1910 West Seattle (Aunt Mamie’s home) died February 1 1983.

Dan born July 30, 1918 died December 31, 1974.  Born in Issaquah and died in our house in the Coalfield area.  Len owns that house now and lives there.

Grandpa Donlan served for years on the election board.  When I was first married I did too, helping him.

Great granddad and grandma were married in Lockport, New York.  Michael Donlan and Anna Murray December 7, 1872.

Grandma Ann Robson Liddle Donlan (my mother-in-law) March 22, 1875 – September 20, 1947.  Born in Sherman Hill, England.  (Newcastle on the Tyne, England Grandma Liddle 825 10th Ave, address of boarding house.)

Both of Dan’s grandpas were killed by Seattle streetcars.

Also great grandma Liddle lived in Seattle in their boarding house close to St. James.  Now is owned by Seattle University, if still standing (2001).  She used to shop at the Seattle Market when I was first married.  Never watched cars.  “They shan’t hit you Evelyn”.  Grandma Liddle November 3, 1850 Newcastle on the Tyne died July 1944.  Age 94 lived ???????? years.

Michael Henry born in Lockport, New York November 20, 1872.  he died September 20, 1946.  His wife, Ann Robson Liddle, was born march 22, 1875 and died September 20, 10947 in Sherman Hill, England.

Great grandparents homesteaded in the early 1880’s.  Grandpa carried a cook stove on his back from Goode’s Corner to the Donlan homestead.

Dan (my husband and father of our five children, Cheryl, Danella, Leonard, Maureen and Larry Donlan) was born July 30, 1918 and died in our home in Renton, December 31, 1974.

Evelyn Evans Donlan, Dan’s wife was born in Yakima, Washington September 8, 1919.  My mother’s name was Gladys Eule Young Evans.  (Her father was Edwin Young and mother was Jessie Marquam.)  My father was Harry Evans born and raised in Prosser.  His father was Maurice and his mother was Margaret Harper Evans.

I married the second time to Anthony P, Schall.  He was a retired Army CW4 man.  We traveled so much; Europe, Far East, drove back to Wisconsin once and to California,  a number of times.  He was such a nice man.  Died of a heart attack after four and a half years of marriage.

AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)

Evelyn Donlan Schall

Kenneth Schmelzer

Name: Kenneth Schmelzer

Birth Date or Year (optional):

1925

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

Arrived in Issaquah June, 1951.

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

Accepted a job teaching “wood shop” Industrial Arts in Issaquah High School, school year of 1951.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

Retired from teaching 1982 and decided that Issaquah “was” a good place to spend retirement.

 

Education—Coming of Age

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

We had just moved into a new High School when the 1965 quake occurred.  The lights to the classroom dimmed and went out.  As the power panel for my wing of the school was placed in a small room at the rear of my classroom, I discovered the circuit breaker had tripped.  Just as I threw the breaker handle into place, I heard this rumble, looked out the door into my classroom and noticed the floor moving up and down.  I shouted to the 24 boys in the class to stay in the room and wait until the movement subsided.  Later inspection proved that no damage to the building had occurred!  We went on double shift the next day as the Junior High had been damaged beyond repair.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

1.      Cussac’s Shoe Store.  Still in business in 1951.

2.      Tom Drylie’s “Honeysuckle.”  Old fashioned soda parlor, soda bar and booths.  Our first meal upon arriving in Issaquah, June 1951.  A milkshake and cheese sandwich.  Tom was also the local Greyhound bus agent that stopped in front of his business.  They still had the iron stools at the bar and the “cut” glass soda glasses.

3.      Red and White Market.  Located where the entrance to Issaquah Market is now.

4.      Dave Lewis’ Barber Shop and Brady’s Department Store about where the service station is located at Sunset and Front Street.

5.      Maulsby’s Department Store.  Located about where Edward D. Jones is now.  Best clothing store Issaquah ever had, even now.  Carried shirts, suits, Filson jackets, work clothes, women’s wear, men’s hats, sewing yardage, hunting clothes.

6.      Fischer’s Market.  Still had sawdust on the floor in 1951.

7.      Washington State Bank.  Only two tellers in 1951.

8.      Dahlbottom 10 cent Store.  Next to Peters Agency.  Mrs. Dahlbottom was a sister to Mrs. Maulsby.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

The ceiling high stack of small drawers with a sliding ladder.  These were full of small parts dating back to ?.  If you needed old hardware for your house, Tom Lewis could locate same in one of these drawers.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

In 1951 Tony Whalen arrived on the steps of the “wood shop” with a “split in two pieces” meat cutters block.  He wanted it fixed and assumed that any good woodshop teacher worth his “salt” could solve his problem.  Now that block was about 30 inches square of rock hard maple.   How to drill several holes through it was a problem.  I welded a ¼ inch rod to an auger bit and drilled the block several times and inserted threaded rods to pull the two sections together.  Tony picked up his block the next day and returned to his meat market.  The next time I went shopping at Tony and Johnny’s, Tony handed me a package wrapped in butcher paper.  It contained four of the finest “T bone” steaks I have ever cooked.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

Good meat market, good food locker and good variety of “basic” groceries.  Managed by Mr. Kramer.  They always had an extensive line of groceries and there was a Dance Hall upstairs.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

“The Honeysuckle” preceded Rena’s Café.

The Drylie family lived upstairs.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

Local bars and saloons were a “No-No” for a school teacher in Issaquah in 1951.  I did not even by beer at the grocery store!

Stonebridge’s Tavern  located where the bath fixture store is now.

Union Tavern located where it still is.

There was a Tavern where the new library is now.

Park Inn located where the road leading to Gibson Hall intersects with Sunset.

Airport Tavern located where Costco is now.

There may have been a tavern on Goode’s Corner in 1951.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

How about Grange Mercantile now Chinese furniture, etc., etc.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

It was located where Edward D. Jones office is now.  There in 1951 Mr. Lawill was very polite and reserved acting.

Also Henniger’s Drug Store in 1951 or so (can’t remember), ask Eric Erickson.

Dr. Hillery and Ross Grimm were only doctors in Issaquah at that time.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

Please ask Walt Seil about his father who was a memorable police officer (the only one) in 1951.

 

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

Mayor Flintoft who was the local undertaker.

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

Junior Chamber of Commerce put the new street signs up.  Contact Roy Peterson ex city councilman at that time.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

Football games at Memorial Field.  Weather freezing cold, seems like the whole town tuned out for the game.  Viewers stand built in 1951 of World War II lumber furnished by Issaquah School District.  Located where library is now.  A number of ex-Issaquah players always coached from the side-lines even though the school had a football coach on the field.

Ask Eric Erickson about this.  Charles Fallstrom and Dan Coyle were coaches in 1951.

A lot of times there was a fist fight after the game.

195? Something the Junior Chamber of Commerce made the Christmas lights and decorations for Front Street.  Had a turkey raffle to raise funds.  After that, sold birthday calendars to raise funds.  This started the annual Christmas light decorations.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Hiked all of the old railroad grades on Tiger Mountain before Issaquah Alps was ever thought of.

Favorite Hike:  A number of men teachers from the High School used to hike to the radio beacon on Squak Mountain and eat supper watching the sun go down over the Seattle skyline and walk back in the dark with flashlights.

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

I have a history of Wood and Iverson, Inc. now being published.  It should be ready by summer.

The photograph in the Memory Book was shot on Tiger Mountain road crossing.  It is a Wood and Iverson Climax Locomotive.

 

Railroad—Transportation

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

It stopped the number of collisions at the intersection of Front and (Gilman Blvd.) I-10.  No stop light, just a caution light.  You had to look both ways and if all clear, “Floor it” to go out East Lake Sammamish Parkway.  Many, many wrecks there.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

1953 Chevrolet bought from Stonebridge Chevrolet.

 

Additional Memories

Washington state Bank:  contact Hazel Wilfong.  (Bicycle shop now)

M. Johnson Lumber Company:  Contact Gary LaChance.  (Chinese restaurant)

Stevens Grocery Store:  Contact Hazel Wilfong.  (About where barbershop is)

Brady’s Department store:  Contact Clint Brady.

Fasanos:  Contact Walt Seil or Erick Erickson (Next to Log Cabin tavern)

U. S. Post Office:  1951 next to Fish Hatchery.

Reg. Thomas’s Furniture Store:  Now Allens’.

Dr. Hillery.

Clive Berry Floral Shop:  Contact Roy Peterson.

Issaquah Laundry:  Contact Hazel Wilfong.  (Behind Flintofts)

 

AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)

Kenneth Schmelzer, February 26, 2001

Waler Seil

Walter Wood Seil

Waler Seil

Walt Seil in his senior yearbook photo, ca 1941.

Name: Walter Wood Seil

(Walt Seil)

 

Birth Date or Year (optional):

9/15/20

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

56 years at this address, maybe 6-8 years did not live here out of 80 years.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

I felt I belonged here, family was here, bought a business here and loved all the people

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

1st – 2nd Issaquah

3rd – 8th Snoqualmie Falls

9th – 12th Issaquah

 

Family History in Issaquah:

Raised 2 daughters, Sandra & May.

 

Education — Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential? 

I entered high school in 1931.  Fred Frohs a great teacher.

I played football for 4 years, I had 4 stripes on my sweater and 3 stars for being a captain, and all conference twice.  The best years of my life were in high school.  Morgon was one of my favouite teachers.  I played basket ball in my first year, baseball 1 year, I shot my hand so I couldn’t play anymore ball so I drove school bus so Morgon could teach.  I also acted in school plays, I fought in the smokes too.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

My favorite teachers were Fred Frohs agriculture teacher and George Morgon was a PE teacher and History teacher.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

No we weren’t.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I was in a play – Huckleberry Finn.  I was the father of Huckleberry.  I was a sales lady also in a play selling purple punk pills.  Harold Chevalier was the manager.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

My parents kept me busy on the farm milking and haying etc.

 

Local Businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

When I was growing up I remember a restaurant cross from City Hall, owned by Judge – a big meal for $.45.

We had lockers & shopped at the Grange next to the creamery also went to Red & White store owned by Leonard Miles.  Best ice cream parlor, Dryles owned it.  The Trailway stages stopped and picked up passengers.  Money Savers was first chain store to be here, on Sunset next to Log Tavern.  These were here from 1920 to 1950 & longer.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

My dad cut my hair till I left home – 21 years old.  After the war I went to Dave Lewis his shop was next door to Heplers Ford garage.  Dave was very interested in hunting and fishing.  One day I stopped in for a hair cut, was in the chair, he was busy cutting my and 2 fellows come in – they also were interested in fishing & hunting.  They started telling fish stories and he was so interested in them he came and started to take the apron off.  I said you haven’t cut all my hair.  He was so interested in the stories.  Still more stories I can tell.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

I have been shopping at Lewis for 55 years.  My grandpa & dad shopped there for years also.  Tom used to drive the school bus for Issaquah.  When I was in the first grade I would fall asleep before I got home, he would carry me into our house and put me on the davenport.  We lived in Hobart then.  We bought nails, tools, plumbing equipment, paint, kitchen utensils and what have you.  Wonderful family.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

We went to Tony & Johnny’s – they delivered your groceries, gave you credit and had good meat.  It was operated by Joe as manager of meat dept.  Tony Walen and Johnny Hirchs were good people to deal with.  George Reiny was a very good clerk.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker? 

We shopped there, rented a frozen food storage.  We shopped there from when they opened till they closed.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

I went to Dryles Ice cream parlor on Front St.

Shamrock, a quick lunch café on Front St. The operators were Elenor Crosby and Gert Chevalier.  It was on the cornor of Front St. and Sunset St. on the west side.

At that time Triple X was on Sunset and 3rd Ave, cross from Fink Garage.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

We went to Boehms often.  Enjoyed them all, they have good buys on the broken chocolates.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent? 

I never went to the saloons or local bars.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

My father and I belonged to it for over 60 years.  We buy our gas there bird feed, yard supplies and fertilizer.  Good people to do business with.

 

What do you recall about Lawwil’s drug store?

We shopped.

 

Local Politics

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time? 

For many years it was Hill St. we never had any house numbers either till we were given 330 SE Bush and we had mail delivered then.  Councilman Roy Peterson was the one who got our new address east of Front St. and south of Sunset was named after old timers of Issaquah.

 

Issaquah Round-Up– Salmon Days– Labor Day Celebrations

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

In 1926 to 1930, they were the Issaquah Rodeo days that remember.  I had 2 uncles who rode in the rodeo, Schuler and Elwel Bennett, my grandma’s brothers.  I was about 8 years old, they got me to ride in Shetland pony races.  We also rode the calves coming out of the shoots During those rodeo days the state was dry so people made their own liquor if they wanted some, so there was many fights going on, so our jail was full nearly all the time.

 

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

Our big parades were on Labor Day.  I was paid a nickel taking the horses from the railroad train to the rodeo grounds.  I was 5 & 6 years old then they had big carnivals with the rodeos.

 

Outdoor Recreation

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

I would catch my limit some days.  The limit was 21 fish, I was 12 years when I started.  I would start at the bridge on Sunset highway, start fishing towards the lake till I got my limit.  It was trout I would catch in the Issaquah Creek.  We would catch some perch, cut throat and steelhead in the lake too.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there? 

We would go roller-skating, swimming rent a rowboat, they had entertainment there.  Roy Widen wrestled there once in a while.  My cousin had a wedding on roller skates there.  Class reunions were there also.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

We would walk down to Han Jenson farm, jump off the piling and go swimming.

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

I worked for Baldridge Logging on Hobert, St Paul Tacomc and Marankas.  I was a donkey engineer, high rigger and operated all kinds of machines.  I tapped many trees rigging.  The logging camps brought people into town to spend money on the taverns and stores.  The town grew as more & more logging camps open up.  The Rodeo days were wild, with all the moonshine and home brews.  Jails were full, hoses were used to cool them down.  They had to put iron doors up because the cork shoes made holes in the wood.  Trains were used to transport logs from Snoqualmie to Seattle through Issaquah.  Some logs were 1 log per car, 6 to 8 average logs per log.  My daughters used to wave at the trains as they went through town.

This picture was taken 2 blocks from where I lived on Mine Hill Tiger Mtn.

 

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

I’ve been around all of them but never worked at any of the mills.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

I wasn’t round here then – I was on Tiger Mtn.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there? 

My brother Rex and I, we hired out by the farmers.  We started out by Hobart and went to yards in Issaquah working in the hay fields from 1936 to 1939.

 

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

When we were going to school we boys would go down on week ends and play with the Pickering boys, jumping in the hay loft.

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

No, I never did, my grandfather and my brother Jack did.

 

Railroad– Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

My aunt lived in Seattle, with 6 children, so we would go in once in a while by car and visited with them.  We had to go on Rainier Ave. to get to Seattle.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

We had to go on 900 to Renton, to Rainier Ave. in Seattle.

It shortened the drive to Seattle so they could go shopping in there, with the bus it helped everyone.  Very few people in Seattle knew where Issaquah was before the bridge was built.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

My first car was given to me when I was 16 years old by my grandfather Wood.  It was a Model T Ford in the 20s.

 

Fraternal Organizations– Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I joined the Elks in 1976.  I am a Charter member.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

I never attended any of their meetings.  I went with my dad for a few times to the turkey shoots.  I t was started in 1921 – Paul Koss is charter member and lives across the street from us, he is 93 years old.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

I was a coach for pee-wee boys football team in the middle 1950s.  We used the hall to meet in for our lockers.  It was also used for many dances during our high school days – 1936 on.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

I went to a few dances there.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining? 

I never worked in the mines, but my great grandfathers son, Bill Price, was killed in the German mine on Squak Mt.  Howard Seil was killed in the Harris Mine.  My dad worked in the Tiger Mt. Mine, my brother worked in the Bianko Mine, my grandfather worked in the Grand Ridge Mine.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss? 

There was always a long line on Saturday nights.  The cost was $.10.  We saw Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, Frankenstein and Hop-Along Kassady.

 

Additional Memories

The report came that someone was dumping water from the NP Bridge to the cars below.  The police went up there, one each of bridges and caught the boys, took them to the police station, parents were called to pick them up.

One of the most interesting things we have is the Fish Hatchery, it has been here over 50 years.

Back to the Memory Books