Primary Source

Helen Peters Stackable

Name: Helen Peters Stackable

Birth Date or Year (optional): June 24, 1915

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

My parents lived there until their deaths in 1958 (Dad) and 1963 (Mother)

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

In 1920 we moved to Issaquah because my father wanted his own dairy farm. There were big stumps on the field on the east side of the Road to Monohon. We had 160 acres.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

My parents moved to Issaquah when Dad retired. Then Stu and Imogene Woodside ran the farm. Imogene worked at the Grange Store. Stu has died (1991). Imogene and her family now live 1 ½ miles from me. They were dairy farmers too.

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

First grade to high school graduation.

 

Education — Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

All high school closes were on the 3rd floor of the school, except for cooking or sewing classes and manual training classes, which were in the building behind the school.

My third, fourth and fifth grade classes were in annexes. Third and fourth were in a 2-room annex, and fifth was in a single building in front of the double annex.  Miss Evans, Miss LaBrash and Miss Bresnahan were the teachers in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

She was substitute teacher and I don’t recall having her often.  She and me mother were friends. Willow Gene Herren was my 7th grade teacher. She often read to the class.

Mrs. Cabness was my second grade teacher. She always wore a black dress with a handkerchief peeking out of a pocket.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

I was not in Issaquah then.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I was in the Debate Team. I was never very good at sports.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

I liked school and liked the teachers, so I didn’t get in trouble. Also, I came to school via school bus, so didn’t have much time to get in trouble.

We would go to dances at school, basketball games, movies (evenings). Movies were not shown often.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Drylie’s Honeysuckle – sodas, ice cream.

Cussac’s shoe store.

Grange – bought most of our groceries there.

Stephenson’s Drug Store

Wold Store – hardware

Miles Store – hardware

A dress shop – owner was Miss Eaves

Mr. Benson’s Barber Shop

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Mr. Benson was my barber. His shop was near the Wold Store. I had wavy hair, so didn’t go to beauty shops until I was much older.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Hardware items. I didn’t do much shopping there, as my parents bought what we needed.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

My family usually shopped at the Grange Store, and Fisher’s Market. There was another meet market owned by Mr. Finney – it was near Fisher’s on Main Street. We bought meat there too. My parents let me have a small sack of candy for a nickel when I was with them on a shopping trip – when I was in grade school, and at the grange.  There were dances upstairs in the grange hall, now and then.  Fun was had by all!

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

Yes, we bought most of our groceries at Grange Mercantile.  My brother, Bill Peters worked there for a while when Ellsworth Pickering was manager. My first job was helping to take inventory at the Grange.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

Rena’s Café must have existed after “my time.”

Drylie’s (spelling?) had ice cream and sodas (It was near Cussac’s shoe store). I didn’t go there often – my mother made ice cream at home.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

I was not living in Issaquah then.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

After high school I was in Seattle and later in California, so was not in local bars. Also, there was Prohibition.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

My Dad, C.W. Peters, bought farm supplies there. My brother, Bill Peters, would go there with Dad.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

We usually went to Stephenson’s Drug Store. It was on Main Street [Front Street] across from Fisher’s Meat Market.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

I never voted in Issaquah. After I finished U. of WA I worked in Seattle and lived there during the week (at a boarding house). From Seattle I transferred to a branch of the Northern Life Insurance Company in San Diego, Calif. Where I met my husband. We married in 1940.

 

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

I recall her, but was not involved in politics (graduated from High School in 1933, and was at the University of Washington in 1934).

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

The high school did not have an “annual” (yearbook) in 1933. “Sammamish” was published 1931 and 1932.

We lived on a Dairy Farm, and had a vegetable garden. Also, there was an orchard – cherries and apples. Also, we had three pie cherry treed and plum trees. My mother did lots of canning. If a neighbor who butchered, we might get meat – tho we got meat at Fisher’s in Issaquah usually.

We had 2 quince trees too. As boys walked down to Lake Sammamish to swim, they would take one bite of a quince and throw the remains on the road – they must have thought it was a kind of apple.

Actually the Depression did not affect our daily life too much. My parents probably worried about low milk prices. We raised potatoes  – selling price $1 a sack (a “gunny” sack). My Dad gave potatoes to some friends in Issaquah.

There were large blackberry bushes on our place. Also some salmon berry bushes.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

Cliff Benson and Ray Smart did not come back. These tragedies affected everyone. The boys were closer to my brother in age, but we knew both families. Mrs. Benson was my Sunday School teacher. Nellimae Smart (now Nolet) and I still are friends and see each other every few years.

 

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

I was not in Issaquah then. I married in 1940 and was living in California.

 

Issaquah Round-Up — Salmon Days — Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I knew about Salmon Days – but had been away from Issaquah a long time by then.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

The rodeos – two cousins from Ellensburg cam over to ride the bucking horses. They would stay with our family – on the farm about 2 miles from town (56th street now). Friends of theirs came also – these fellows sometimes slept in the hay in the barn! Also, we could hear the music from the Rodeo Carnival in the playfield beyond the train tracks in Issaquah.

I learned to dance at the carnival section of the Rodeo. A picture including one cowboy cousin, Schaller Bennett is in A Social History of an American School, by Joe Peterson (the picture of Prof. Clark and the graduates of the 1917 graduating class). [page 32]

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

My brother wore glasses in first grade. He lost his glasses on the school hill between the school ground and the railroad. We searched, but never found them!

Flood & log jam – mid 30’s (bit we’re not sure of dates). A lake formed on the hill behind High Point. It suddenly “let loose.”  As I recall, a boy was killed. My brother reminded me about a huge log jam down by the bridge near our house (56th Street). He was 16 and he was driving home that night and said the water could have washed out the end of the bridge if he had crossed it. The right turn into our yard was very close to the bridge.  The next day Peter Rippee (spelling?) came down and worked hard to break up the log jam.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

My brother fished often. He also caught eels, which he then sold to fishermen.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

My brother Bill Peters danced at Vasa Park more than I did (he is three years younger, and he drove cars more than I did in my teens).

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer? Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Mostly we swam at the State Park but enjoyed swimming near Monohon. My close friend and chemistry partner was Marse Western. Her mother, Myrtle Bush, married Dave Horrocks. I surely enjoyed skating at the Horrocks Farm.

Everyone I knew got ice skates the year when it was freezing for about three weeks. However, we didn’t get much chance to enjoy our ice skates, as the winters didn’t get that cold again (as far as I know).

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

I remember the Monohon Mill.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

We could see the smoke, and drove down there the next day.

 

Salmon Hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

It was very interesting and brought people to Issaquah. We took visitors up to see the salmon hatchery.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

We were dairy farmers. I never milked cows – we always had a hired man (2 in summer during haying time).  There were two horses – Belle and Major. Occasionally they got “out” and a neighbor would call to let us know.  Sometimes we had to look for them. They were :work” horses and I never rode them. Later we did get a tractor.

 

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

Our house was near the bridge on 56th, but part of our farm was across from the Pickering Farm. We knew and liked the Pickering family. I recall Mores. Fernell (spelling?), Gladys Bush Pickering (and Ada and Ernest), the Ray Pickering family. Sometimes we walked along the Issaquah Creek toward Issaquah to visit Uncle and Aunt, Leo and Lena Shaller, who lived close to Issaquah. We walked through the Pickering property then.

 

Railroad– Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

We probably went to Seattle once every month, or month and a half. My Dad met with other Seattle Milk Shippers every month. Usually Mother and I would go shopping at Frederick & Nelsons, and other stores (Bon Marché or Nordstrom’s). If they had other things to do, they would let me go to a movie and would pick me up later.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

I don’t know. Probably it was easier to give directions to the town and made Issaquah more accessible.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

We had a Buick for a long time. I do not know where my Dad bought it. I think the curtains snapped on.

 

Fraternal Organizations– Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

My father, C.W. Peters, was a Mason. My mother, Meta Peters, belonged to Eastern Star.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

Yes. There were many activities and programs there.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

I do not recall specific movies, but we did go, probably once a week. As I recall, someone played the piano part of the time. I vaguely remember “The Talkies.” Much anticipation and excitement – cost was nominal. Before the movie of the evening, there was the news and a short comedy. “Kids” usually sat in the front – near the stage, and parents were mostly in the middle or back of the theater.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

Community Church – Street back of Grange street and railroad tracks. I went to Sunday School for years. Dad would take my brother and me, then he’d go to Drylie’s Honeysuckle on Main Street [Front Street] and get the Times (Seattle Sunday paper). We subscribed to the “P.I.” We would walk home, down the railroad tracks. Sometimes he would pick us up, stopping at the nearest crossing if he saw us coming.

 

Additional Memories

When my brother, Bill Peters, was a Junior in High School, he and some friends followed the seniors on Senior Sneak Day. They had to get permits from each member of the School Board in order to get back in school. Incidentally, our Dad was one of the School Board members!!

Mrs. Willis, who taught  4th grade, started a Girl Scout Troop.  We met at her home. I also went to Scout camp for a week each summer. Later, when my three daughters were growing up, I was a Girl Scout Leader.

I can recall when Andy Wold’s sister was the school nurse.

In the school cafeteria a cup of soup or cocoa was 3 cents. Sandwiches were 6 cents.  The lunchroom was on the first floor and the school building (near the first grade room).

When Bergsmas built a new barn, they held a dance there before the barn was put to use.

On rainy days, recess was on the first floor of the main school building. It sure was noisy!

I recall playing in the sand along the Issaquah Creek, which went through our property. We would make small ditches – then carry water to fill the ditches and watch it run back to the creek. There was a large sand bar, too, where we would have family picnics.

I recall when our phone number was 672. Probably in the 1920s!

Back to the Memory Books

Peechie Bergsma Stefani

Name: Peechie Stefani

Birth Date or Year (optional):

2-13-1908

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

I came here from Holland when I was 3.  We lived on various farms and there were 9 children in our family.  I have lived in my house since 1929 when my husband and I married and had it built.  I am 93 years old.

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

My dad was sponsored by Bert Vandemere, a Dutch farmer, who moved here before we came.  We came as there was not much chance of earning a living in Holland in those years.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

We stayed because of the opportunity to better our lives through hard work and because the valley was such a pretty place.  Bessie Wilson Crane’s family built our farmhouse that we grew up in.

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Issaquah Grade School and a school in Hobart.

 

Family History in Issaquah:

We came as a family of 5 and grew to one of 11.  Now there is a Bergsma family picnic we number in the 100s.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

(Grade school) Miss Master was my first grade teacher in 1914.  So many children couldn’t speak English and there were Dutch, Swedish, Finnish, and Italian.  She had patience unending to teach English.  One of the local Issaquah girls heard that I could sing a Dutch song and she locked me in the outdoor bathroom and wouldn’t let me out until I sang it and I thought I would miss my bus ride home.  Lawrence Jensen was my bus driver.  Clem Stefani was in 1st grade too, and we married in our 20s in 1929.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Everyone liked Minnie Wilson Schombers.  Mr. Schobert was our 8th grade teacher.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

The earthquake in 1965 knocked some bricks off our chimney at our house, and sent the piano to the other side of the room, but that was all.

We heard the high school was damaged quite a bit.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I won a race during Labor Day and won a pair of stockings for it.  A man asked me to be his partner in the 3 legged sack race but I don’t remember if we won or not.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

We were so busy on the farm we didn’t have free time.  Milking cows, weeding and planting corn for silage, cleaning lanterns, mending socks, planting potatoes and mangles, putting up hay.  There were nine kids in our family and we were always busy.  We cut wood, fed cows and calves, brought in wood and kindling and washed clothes on washboards.  As a teenager I danced the Charleston all the way to the barn to milk cows and my dad didn’t like me to do it because my shoes wore out too fast.

When anyone in the valley built a chicken house or a barn we would hold a big dance there before it was used.  A piano would be moved in, everyone came to dance and someone, usually Albert Jenson, would play his accordion.

I don’t remember getting into any trouble.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Cussac’s Shoe Store on Front Street: Mr. Cussac had shoe boxes stacked to the high ceilings in row after row but it was mostly for show as half of them were empty.  His wife helped him sell shoes sometimes, too.  Mr. Cussac played some kind of an instrument (bag pipes maybe?) and he led the Labor Day Parade for several years.  In later years he had a machine you stood on and it showed your feet in your shoes like an x-ray.

Van Winckles had a store too.  Miss Eves had a dress shop on Front Street.  Coutts was a store for materials and clothes.  Mr. Hall had a surrey and ponies that took people for rides.

Burkes store had everything.  People couldn’t speak English and would point to what they wanted and he had a tall ladder on wheels and he would move it and climb up and get the item.  Mary and Eleanor, his daughters, went to school with us.  He would keep a running account and you paid your bill and he would give the kids candy.

Mickey Miles ran the Red and White store on Sunset.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

No one had money for it.  In the Flapper Days, girls cut their hair really short.  Later marcels were popular and it was done with a hot iron.  I learned finger waving and did friends hair for them.  Agnes Maroni went to beauty school in Renton and Anna Burgolis was the owner and teacher.  The first perms were done with machines and hair burned easily if you weren’t careful.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Pots and pans, meat grinders and other household items were purchased at Lewis Hardware.  J. J. Lewis started it, I think.  Tom went to school with us and he married my friend Reada Pickering and we visited each others homes.  Reada made a great homemade bread and gave me the recipe.  I still make 7 loaves every so often.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Burkes when I was a child.  Later we went to Tony and Johnny’s and R & R Grocery.  Mostly we shopped at the Grange Mercantile.  Joan Karvia was the bookkeeper and Ethel Stickney and my sister, Hettie Wiggins were clerks.  Charley Chamness was the butcher.  They had hams and bacons smoked and cured for you and they were good.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

When the lockers went in we could butcher our beef and get the meat cut and wrapped in the butcher shop and rent a locker to keep it in.  It was great as we had to can our meat before that.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

When we were kids in the early 1900’s we were too poor.  The sidewalks were wooden and if you did have a dime and it dropped, it would go through the cracks.  Mrs. Marion ran a restaurant in the Grand Central Hotel and I went to work for her.  A man came in and asked for a “bucket of mud” and paid for his coffee with a hundred dollar bill.  It was the first one I had ever seen.  People coming from Eastern Washington stopped to rent rooms on their way to Seattle and ate there.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

My favorites were the creamy candies.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

I’m still waiting to go to them (and maybe that’s why I’m still living at age 93. 🙂

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

We always bought our fuel there.  Sometimes we purchased garden supplies too.  My husband Clem was on the Board of Directors at one time.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

Ann Lotto worked there for years.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

Stella Alexander had the whole town in an uproar but I can’t recall the details.

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

Not living right in town, it didn’t bother me.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

Lots of men stopped at our place and asked for food and we fed them all.  Some chopped wood to pay for a meal.  Some men were walking from Seattle to Eastern Washington to pick fruit and had no money and needed a handout. We had chickens and eggs, milk from our cow and I baked bread so we always had food.  We finally asked one man why all of them stopped here and he said there was a bum camp below the school (where the skate board park is now).  Next to the railroad tracks they slept and cooked and shared information about who would give them food along the way.  That is how they found our house.  One man was from California and hated the rain here.  He was a house painter and paper hanger so we gave him a job fixing my mothers place at the Issaquah Valley Diary and when he got paid he headed back to sunny California.

One man was chopping wood outside the kitchen window one summer day and our party line phone rang.  He dropped the axe and took off down the road without waiting to eat and we realized he was a fugitive evading the law.

My husband worked with his Dad at Stefani Poultry Farm during the Depression.  We had food because of the chickens, our garden, canned fruit and vegetables and our milk cows, beef and pig.  We even canned soup in quart jars and grew potatoes, beans and corn.  Card playing with friends was our entertainment or we visited relatives.  We went to Alexander’s Park for picnics.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

Some of our relatives joined the Army.  Ruel Wiggins and Henry Lewis were in the army and both returned ok.  We sent coffee and sugar to relatives in Holland that were out of everything.  We grew a Victory garden and we bought war bonds.  There were ration stamp books for butter, sugar, and gas.  I made black-out curtains and my husband was an air raid warden.  A cigarette could be hand rolled on a machine with papers and tobacco.

 

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

Lots of women went to work at Boeing.  Our neighbor Betty Brault became a riveter on airplane wings.  Shipyard work increased.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

There were parades, races, and rodeos.

 

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

Bucking horses and concessions.  We sat in the grandstands and enjoyed it all.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

I remember the KKK burning a cross towards Monohon.  Everyone in the valley could see it.

In the 1930s a big barn was built at our Issaquah Valley Dairy and a huge barn dance was held there with dancing and food enjoyed by most of the town.  Another dance hall was the Shake Roof located just up the road a little from my house at 8020 Renton-Issaquah Road SE.  It was built from cedar shakes and was a popular place until it burned down.  Fred Case built and operated it.

 

Outdoor Recreation

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Lots of dances were held there.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

I remember the Monohon Mill burning down.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

My dad had a farm and delivered milk in town, High Point and Preston.  He started delivering milk to the coal mines.  When he lived on Pickering Hill and worked at the mine.  He put cans of milk on the buggy and took it by horse.  Then he sent the horse home by itself and Mama washed the milk cans and fed the horse.  Finally he delivered with a truck and then 2 trucks and the family moved to the Gordon Prentiss place and Issaquah Valley Diary was formed.  All 9 kids worked on the farm and I milked cows from age 11.  When my husband later asked my dad for my hand in marriage my dad said, “You are getting my best milker!”  I was 21 then.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

Dad brought us to Seattle when we were 14 and my sister and I were scared to death of the city.  We spent most of our time walking around and around the block where the Bon Marche was.  Dad was at a milk shippers meeting and we were afraid he wouldn’t find us.  Later when I was older I went to Seattle with Reda Pickering and we went to dances.  You drove the Sunset Highway and went through Renton.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

I didn’t drive so it didn’t make much difference.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

We bought a 1928 Ford from Hepler.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

My husband Clem belonged to the Sportsman Club.  He built a big pen in our back yard and we raised pheasants and a few Golden Pheasants.  When they were grown the game department boxed them up and took them to various parts of the state to “plant” them for hunting season.

He worked for them as a game warden for a while and helped organize the turkey shoots at the clubhouse too.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

I went to dances there.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

We danced there and went to dinners cooked by Grange members.  Clif and Loretta Lewis did a lot of cooking there.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

My father worked in the Issaquah mine before he started the dairy.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Programs were put on there too.  They did a Charleston event there and had a contest on the stage.  I didn’t know all the steps so wouldn’t dance in it.  Saw silent movies there and thought they were terrible.  The first Al Jolson movie was a talking movie and when his loud voice started I just about jumped out of my chair as it scared me so bad.

A lady played the organ during the silent movies and she really played beautiful music but I can’t remember her name.

I think it cost 25 cents to go to the show, and sometimes they gave away dishes at the movie house.

 

Front Street

In 1910 and 11 the sidewalks were all wooden.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

My mother wanted to get to church but there was no way to get to town so we didn’t go.

 

Additional Memories

When I was young we brought a little money to school at Christmas so presents could be bought for everyone.  I was in 2nd grade and at the party there was a tree covered with presents and a beautiful French porcelain doll at the top.  We drew numbers and I won the doll and I was so happy.  When I was 14 my mother made me give my doll to my younger sisters and soon she wasn’t looking very good.  Her clothes were gone and her eyes were poked out and her arms and legs were in two different rooms.  One day I gathered up the parts and she resides in a dresser drawer awaiting restoration.

Someone gave us a little cast iron stove that was the cutest little toy.  It had pots and pans and a tiny coal bucket.  One day we decided to cook so filled it with dry leaves and set them a fire.  I wonder what ever became of that stove!

When we were coming home from school in our horse and buggy with my brother Art driving it, the gypsies chased us.  We tried to go around them but they caught the halter of the horse and we were scared.  All they wanted to know was where there was a field where they could camp and stake out their horses.  We told them of a place and they let us go.  We were 2nd and 3rd graders.  We met our mother running towards us, afraid for us.  The gypsies had been at our farm and had stolen eggs from the henhouse and milk from the milk house and she thought they might steal us too.

 

AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)

Peechie Bergsma Stefani

Alice and George Swanson in 1943

Alice Swanson

Name: Alice Swanson Bogdan

Birth Date or Year (optional): June 27, 1925

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

My father, Martin Bogdan, had an 80-acre homestead about 5 miles south of Issaquah on the Cedar Grove/Hobart Road. My five sisters and I were all born at home. My oldest sister, Mary, and I still live on property that is part of the original homestead.

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

My late husband, George, grew up in old Newcastle and when we married in 1946 neither of us had any interest or desire to move from the area and our families. Issaquah is, was, and always will be home to me.

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

I attended first grade through 8th grade at the Issaquah Grade School which was located where Issaquah Middle School now stands. Ninth grade through graduation I attended Issaquah High School which was an imposing building located where the Julius Boehm pool is now located.

Family History in Issaquah:

The earliest paperwork we can find shows my father immigrated to the United States from Russia or Poland (we have paperwork showing both!) in 1880. He became a citizen in 1882. He sent for my mother who arrived from Poland and they got married in 1910, living on the homestead south of town.

Education — Coming of Age:

What are your memories of Issaquah High School? Which teachers were influential?

All of my memories of Issaquah High School are wonderful ones. I graduated in 1943 with good friends and my future husband, George Swanson.

Some of the teachers I remember well are Mr. Seaman, who was the English teacher, and Miss Norma Nelson, my home economics teacher. Mr. Seaman played the piano and we all enjoyed his playing during school assemblies.

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

I was out of school at the time of both earthquakes, but remember them well. I had just been home a few days from the hospital after giving birth to my daughter, Lorraine, on April 4, 1949, when the quake hit.

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in? Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays? What were memorable games or plays?

School plays – I was in the all-school play, The Green Vine, when I was a freshman and in the senior play, The Old Ordway House, as a senior. I was active in the I-HI Times, our school paper, and editor of our annual, Sammamish, in 1943.

Local Businesses:

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building? What type of things did you get there? Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

We shopped for groceries at Tony and Johnny’s and The Grange Mercantile. Our first frozen food locker was at the Red and White on Sunset and then, later, at The Grange Mercantile.

World War II:

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah? Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war? Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

I knew several men who were in the service, many of my classmates enlisted upon graduation or even before. My future husband, George, enlisted in the Army Air Corps and left for training on July 5, 1943, soon after we graduated from Issaquah High.

How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah? Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?

Yes, the Kabukata family lived on what is now the Pine Lake Plateau. There was a son in my class, Kenny, and he had two sisters, Uri and Ume. They lived in Issaquah for several years before the war began. The entire family was sent to an internment camp in California.

Issaquah Round-Up– Salmon Days– Labor Day Celebrations:

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

Labor Day was a BIG event in Issaquah. The years that are memorable to me are the years when my daughter and her cousin, Tom Carey, were about 5 and 6 years old and were in the kids’ parade. One year they were selected Junior King and Queen for Labor Day. That was great fun, and it was the same year the Florence Bergsma Harper, still a dear friend, was crowned Labor Day Queen.

In later years Issaquah built a float for Seafair and took it to the Torchlight Parade. For a couple of years when she was in high school, my daughter participated and rode on the float.

Logging and Sawmills:

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

These mills aren’t familiar to me, but the Neukirchen Bros. had a shingle mill on our farm south of Issaquah on the Cedar Grove Road. I have a shingle and the template that was used to stamp the bolts. I also have a picture of some of the men who worked there. The mill burned in 1918 and my home now is just about where the mill was located.

Nate Thomas

Name: Nate Thomas

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

1945-1996

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

1st grade to 12th Grade

 

Education—Coming of Age

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

No, the bricks from the Old Grade School missed me as I ran outside, but they did hit the fellow in front of me.  (1949 Earthquake)

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I played football, basketball, and track.  My senior year was the first year for Issaquah in the King County Conference.  We set a record by going completely defeated for the whole League season.  My most memorable play was getting thrown out of the Bellevue game for trying to hit a guy named Stu Strickland….I missed but got thrown out anyway.

The Issaquah Town Team was great entertainment.  One Sunday they brought in a ringer from the U of W.  The other team, Rainer Beach, coached by Don Sprinkle, pulled his team off the field and refused to play until the ringer was taken out…Great Stuff.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Did not have much free time- played sports and was involved with Boy Scouts and Explorer Scouts.  We did do a lot of hiking and camping…sometimes every weekend, since we did not have a lot of money in those days.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Obviously my most relevant memory was of my father’s furniture store, which I believe he purchased from Reg Johnson in about 1946/47.  My role was janitor or delivery boy.  This job did not pay particularly well, but I had a job!  I also got to go into just about everyone’s home on my deliveries and it was a sociological awakening to discover how everyone lived.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Paul Benson’s……no appointments were necessary, you just looked in the window at the number of people waiting in the chairs gave you a pretty good idea how long you were going to wait.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

The floors- dark hardwood

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Tony Walen was an Eagle Scout, so in order for me to pass my Pioneering Merit Badge I met Tony behind his store with my flint, steel, cedar shavings.  I always thought that was kind of neat and as luck would have it, I got the fire started and ultimately became an Eagle Scout.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

Probably my most vivid memories were of the “Honeysuckle” which was owned by Tom Drylie.  Tom was not a particularly friendly guy, but he served great milk shakes (really thick) and Green Rivers.  I probably drank a couple hundred Green Rivers and as much as I was in Tom’s store he never seemed happy to see me, or anyone else for that matter.

When we first moved to Issaquah, you could get a huge chocolate ribbon Ice Cream cone for 5¢.  I can assure you that I had more than my fair share!  This was at the Busy.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

I could buy my comic books there for 10¢.

 

Local Politics

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

I thought then and I still believe that the name change was a mistake. I lived on “Richtofen” which was changed to the upscale name of “Alder”.  Why the name change is still a sore point.  “Richtofen” had character, much like the Baron.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

I only went to Alexander’s Beach which was owned by George Ek.  What a great place….I would ride my bike down the Eastlake Road, swim all day, then ride home….It doesn’t get any better than that.

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

When my family fist moved to Issaquah in about 1946 Red Hall was still operating his mill along with my supervisor Mr. Harper.

 

Farming and Dairy

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

Never worked there but Ron Funev’s (?) dad did and whenever I went by I would go into the creamery and he would give me the biggest soft serve ice cream cone you ever saw…for free

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

When I was growing up, all the taverns had a “no minor’s allowed” sign.  It took me a while to figure that one out.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

I saw a lot of movies because Jim Brook’s dad owned the theatre so I usually got in for free.  When I had to pay it was 15¢ for anyone under 12.  Obviously, I was 14 or 15 before I started paying more than 15¢…I think that may have been because the theatre was then under new management and they did not realize how old I was.

AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)

Nathan Thomas

Dave Waggoner

Name: David Wagonner

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

I attended the old Issaquah High School up on the Hill where the Julius Boehm Pool is now located.  I remember fondly arriving at school as the sun was just coming up- and you could see the tag or mist covering the town.  Rush hour in those days lasted about ½ hour!!  We would all go in to study hall (before school) and sit around and talk!  We all had lockers in that old building- and if you wanted to know what it looked like – look at your diplomas- the picture of the school is in the background.  I remember Mr. Schmelzer; Mr. Treat; Mr. Nowadnick, and especially Mr. Fallstrom our principal!  Great memories!

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

No memories of her!

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

I vaguely remember the 1949 earthquake.  However I was in college during the 1965 earthquake.  I remember running outside my dorm – watch the telephone poles sway back-n-forth.  I remember how very quiet it was after the quake- then hearing all the sirens for hours.  I couldn’t talk to my family right away- but later I found out everyone was okay!  The college sustained some damage- but not as much as I thought there would be.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I played on the football team and ran on the track team.  I remember Friday nights- we would dress for the game- then run down 1st Ave from the school to Memorial Field where we would play.  The lights would almost light up the whole town.  It was the big event every Friday night- some folks in Issaquah would literally live from Friday to Friday- just for Football games.  The field is still there- right behind the new police station.  When I look at that field memories flood back through my mind.

A fun thing I’ll always remember is I played donkey basketball my senior year.  It was a fund raising event- it was funny to watch!  We didn’t hurt the donkeys but often our own pride got bruised a little!

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

We would always go to a little café right behind the log cabin tavern.  I can’t remember the name of it- but they had great hamburgers and malts.  Also went to the Triple X sometimes.  It was fun- no freeways to worry about in those days- just crossing up and down Front Street.

When we did get into trouble, it wasn’t like today- it was more staying out too long or being with the wrong crowd.  There were fights after school but I tried to stay away from that stuff.

Punishment was being grounded or having my car taken away for a week.  It was devastating- and my attitude would change for the better.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

I remember the Honeysuckle- and eating lunch there lots of times!  It was a “hang-out” for the kids of the day!  My fondest two memories were at the old Grange Building.  Wherever my grandfather (with my Dad and Uncles) would butcher- after the beef was cut up and wrapped, we would go to the “big” walk-in freezer at the Grange.  We would store the beef in old wooden lockers!  Man it was cold in there.  Grandpa would also buy feed while we were there.  I can still smell that smell of grain and hay today!

The other memory I have that is the fondest is- Danielson’s Jewelers on Front Street.  I bought my first engagement ring there.  I was in college so it took me a long time to pick it out- and even longer to pay for it!  In those days there was a lot more trust to but it on lay away then today.  That shop- that purchase- is a precious memory.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Not much socializing- just got a haircut.  The two barbershops I went to- one was on Front Street next to the Wold Building.  The other was on Sunset (at the corner of Front and Sunset) next to the laundromat.  I can’t remember the name of the one on Front Street- but the one on Sunset was Paul’s Barbershop.  I went there for years!

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

I remember shopping there many times with my Grandfather.  Whatever Grandpa needed- somewhere, somehow Mr. Lewis would find it!

As a little boy- a hardware store is fascinating- filled with so many “cubby-holes” and things to look at!  And when you walked in the doorway- an enchanting “smell” of manly tools, nails, saws, etc.  When Grandpa would announce to Grandma- “I’m going to town, to the hardware store”, several of the grandkids would begin to clamor – “Let me go too Grandpa- Let me go too!”  Grandpa would usually, however reluctantly, give in- and that ole black 47 Chevy would haul us all to Issaquah, and Lewis Hardware!

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

I remember Tony & Johnny’s market.  We didn’t shop there very often!  Most of the time we drove to the highlands and shopped there- Safeway or Tradewell.  When the Hi-Lo came to town on Highway 10, my mom shopped there most of the time!

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

Yes I remember the Grange and going there with my Grandparents!  I wrote about the frozen food locker earlier under local businesses.  It was always fun going to the Grange!  The unique smells- going next door to get feed for Grandpa’s cows!  Especially the days we would stop in at the locker in the Grange!  Even if it was a warm day outside, you would bring a coat to go into that freezer!  Just a few minutes in there and you were cold!!

I remember Grandma shopping the Grange store.  Especially for things like flour and sugar.  Grandma used to buy a 50 lb. bag of flour for baking.  She always baked her own bread and rolls.  Same with sugar- 50 lb. bag.  In their kitchen she had a flour bin- I will always remember the baking smells in her kitchen.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

Yes I went to XXX for lots of hamburgers- especially in High School.  We could stay in the car.  Papa burgers were my favorite.  And of course a large frosty of root beer.

Fasano’s was another favorite place!  The family would go there on occasion.

If I remember right Rena’s Cafe was on Sunset Ave near the Log Cabin Tavern- if that was the one, we always went there in High School after games.  That was a favorite hang out!

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Yes- especially as a little boy!  Always liked the smells of the candies being made.  Highway 10 wasn’t as busy in those days as I-90 is today- but people from Seattle would drive out on Saturday s just to buy candy.  I remember meeting Mr. Boehm once as a young boy.  That was a long time ago!

Always have loved their caramels!

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

Really didn’t frequent any of these!

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

Please see the first question on local businesses that is where I wrote memories of the Grange!

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

No real memories.

 

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

Too early for my time!

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

Too early for my generation!

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

Does not apply to me!

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I remember “Labor Day Parade” and going into town to watch it!  Many friends would be in the Parade- floats/bands/ kids- it was fun!  Every year it was the same kind of fun!  Lots of years a carnival would set up on the grassy area now known as memorial field.  The lights would come on at night, and it would be a fun place to go with friends.  All summer long we would look forward to the Labor Day festivities.  It also meant that school would start right after the weekend- so it was the “last fling” of summer for us kids!  Lots of good memories.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

1961- because it was my senior year in High School.  The weather was great! The parade was fun- and the celebration was full of electric excitement.  I remember standing in front of the Old Ford Garage to watch the parade (where the Texaco is now).  After the parade, then we just went to hang out around town! The town was smaller in those says seemed like we knew almost everyone!  The floats in the parade were all local- and most were hand made.  If I close my eyes now, I can see it!  Sure wish I could go back in time and visit it again!

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

Obviously Salmon Days is much bigger than the Labor Day Celebration.  The two main drawing attractions for the Labor Day celebrations were the parade and then the carnival/circus on Memorial Field.  Now its much more- much bigger- lots more attractions.  Is it better?  That belongs to the eye of the beholder.  I’m still partial to the older Labor Day Celebrations.

“Labor Day Parade” was the common saying- Are you going to “Parade”?  That was common in the 50s and 60s.  Mostly local residents- not near the draw of Salmon Days from outside the community!

 

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

Rodeo was before my time! Only heard stories!

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

“Outside” was mostly doing chores at the farm!  Cutting wood on the hillside-  mending fences- spreading manure on fields.  Not a lot of time to hike!

Summer times- swimming in Issaquah Creek at the ole swimming “hole”.  Even occasionally going to the Horrocks pond for a swim.

When you grow up on a family farm- going outside usually meant some kind of work.

Play- was centered around family activities- Picnics at Alexander’s Park or Lake Sammamish State Park.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

I did fish in Issaquah Creek!  Used “periwinkles” for bait!  Sometimes fly-fishing.  The biggest fish I ever caught was about six inches!  It was a trout!

We fished as kids more for fun than to really catch fish.  Most of the time we just threw them back in!

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Our family did not go to Vasa Park much!  I think maybe two times- but that was due to family reunions.  Our family rented the whole park.  I really didn’t see much difference at the park itself- compared to Lake Sammamish State Park.  But the big draw was the Dance Hall.  I didn’t go to dance there- but my Aunts and Uncles went there for dances.  That seemed to be the big drawing point to Vasa Park.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

I didn’t go Ice Skating on Horrock’s Pond, but Dave and Nancy used to let us kids (Waggoner family) swim in the pond in the summer.  I remember it was a “cold pond” but fun and private.  We often would hear stories that the pond was full of leaches (blood suckers), but I never found that to be true.  Just childhood stories.  I remember Dave and Nancy- they went to church with our family- at the “Roadside Chapel”.  Dave used to help my Grandfather often in his farming.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

It is a part of Issaquah!  It has brought us tours- visitors from all over the world.  It is a reflection of what and who we are as a community.  Home- for fish- for pioneers, for children, for all of us!  Just as the salmon return to raise their young- so do we!  As they recover- so do we!  As they grow and leave- so do we!  As they return- so do we!  It is a direct reflection of who we are – what we are!  And people come here to watch it all!  That hatchery is not just about fish- it’s about us- it’s about a place we call home!  A small valley- started long ago by Indians- settled by Pioneers- Grown by people who fall in love with the mountains nestled between a creek!  It is a place I love- with every breath!  It is my home-  and so I too have returned to watch it grow- to see it spawn into new life- and go forth.  What is that hatchery- it’s a mirror of who we are- what we are, its about fish!  It’s about us as a community!  How has it affected Issaquah- it has been there, like a rock.  We have fought as a community to keep it!  We have repaired it, rebuilt it, nurtured it!  And every year now we celebrate what it means!  A place to come home to!  A place we call home!  It is our reflection- fish, people, weather, mountains, and most of all home!

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

Yes- my Grandfather had a dairy farm out the Hobart Road- on the Cedar Grove Road.  40 acres!  Plenty of daily chores for the Grand kids!  He worked hard- milked cows twice a day!  Rain, shine, good days or bad- the farm went on!  I helped with milking, feeding, “haying”, cleaning, cutting wood, gathering eggs, and playing as a family!  Summer, winter, fall, spring- the farm went on!!  That farm made me rich- In Spirit!!

 

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

No- but I knew many of the Pickering Children and Grand Children!

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

No- but I have visited it many times!  As a small boy- as a teenager, and as a grown-up!  It has been here a long time!  My family has known people who work there for their whole adult lives.  I remember getting home delivery (in Seattle) of Alpine Dairy milk- brought by a milkman!  Put into an “Ice Box”- and the Ice man delivered the ice every other day!

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

Two different ways!  When I was little- Mom and Dad and I lived in Seattle on Beacon Hill!  We would go to Grandpa and Grandma’s farm on weekends.  We would use Empire Way to go to Renton.  Then use the “old” Maple Valley Highway to go to Cedar Grove Road (it was gravel in those days) then take the Cedar Grove Road to their house!  Since the 60’s we now use I-90 monthly to get to Seattle!  But I remember vividly using Highway 10 across the floating bridge (with toll booths) and home to Issaquah.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

It changed the sleepy little community forever!  When I was young- people would come to the “country” from Seattle for the weekend.  They would go to weekend homes up by Pine Lake or Beaver Lake or along Lake Sammamish.  In those days (gas being about 50¢ to $1.00 a gallon) commuting to Seattle was not seen as a good thing!  I-90 damaged all of that- it made Issaquah a “bedroom community” for Seattle and Bellevue workers.  I now use I-90 to commute to work in the summers.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

Yes- I paid $99.00 for a 1950 Ford four door sedan.  Dad and I bought it from Dale Larsen at the Ford Garage used car lot!  And before we could get it home- the engine “blew” up!  We knew that when we bought it!  Dad and I towed it home on Highway 10- across the old floating bridge!  He helped me rebuild the engine- actually he did all the work- I mostly watched and helped when I could.  I also bought a 1965 Ford Mustang from the Ford Garage in 1965.  I was one of the first to have (check original)

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I now belong to the Veterans of Foreign Wars!  But I remember watching them march in the Labor Day Parade!  Flags flying- old men- young men! Who served their country!  Walking proudly, walking humbly!  It made me feel like I should serve too!  And I did!  Now I’m home- walking in those same parades.  Walking proudly- walking humbly!  Its good to be home-  I’m thankful for those parades!

I remember the American Legion marching in the 1961 Labor Day Parade- waving to the crowd- flags flying high.  I remember everyone standing up as they marched by!

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

I remember going there a few times with my Dad- but I don’t remember when it was built.  But for years now I can remember hearing “gun-fire” coming from that part of town about every afternoon.

My last contact with the Sportsman’s Club was just two years ago-  attending an Issaquah Police Citizens Academy!

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

Yes- and weddings too!  Well receptions anyway!  My Aunt and Uncle were married in the Issaquah Christian Church and had their reception in the Grange Hall.  Wonderful memory now!

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Lots of Saturday night movies!  Grandpa or Dad would drive us in and drop us off!  Movies were 25¢ for matinees and 50¢ for full length features at night.  Yes, I remember taking a date there- I  remember fondly holding hands and “putting my arm around” her!  Kids were noisy, popcorn was made in a “Popcorn Machine”, and we all had fun!  It was the place to “hang out” for those Junior High School years.

AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)

David Waggoner

Carol Walen

Carol Walen (image courtesy of Flintofts Funeral Home)

Carol Walen (image courtesy of Flintofts Funeral Home)

Name: Carol Walen

I have been meaning for some time to submit some information on my husband’s family.  Now seems to be the time!  I hope it will be of some value and interest.

Walen (originally Walentonomicq)

William Walen (3/4/83-8/15/63) lived in the section of Poland which was under Russian rule.  He emigrated to the United States to avoid conscription into the Russian Army.  He arrived in Wilkeson, Washington in 1906 after having worked in the mines on the east coast for a couple of years and went to work in the mine there.

Anna Pelch (2/4/87-2/6/69) lived in the section of Poland which was under Austrian rule.  She was encouraged to come to America by some people who were visiting in Poland.  She accompanied them on their trip back to Wilkeson, acting as a nanny for their children.

William and Anna met in Wilkeson and were married in Tacoma in 1908.

They lived in Taylor, Washington for several years where their first two children were born:

Sophel Walen Ferguson (3/6/09- 8/18/86)

Joseph (10/29/10-75)

Julia Walen Mourae (7/16/12-  )

They moved to Issaquah in 1912 and lived in a rental home on Bush Street where two sons were born:

Tony (9/17/14-8/7/61)

Frank (1/6/18-5/25/89)

In early 1918 they moved into a new home which they had built on property they had purchased along Newport Way.  William continued to work in the mines until 1923 although they had started a dairy before the end of World War I.  He worked night shift and walked to the mine over cemetery hill.

Daughter Julia remembers that milk was first delivered by hand held carriers.  Later a remodeled Star car was used for delivery.  The dairy was strictly a family business and continued until 1943.  William and Joseph went to work in the shipyards.

Tony Walen with John Hirko opened a grocery store in Issaquah in 1937- “Tony and Johnnie’s”.  It was in a building on Front Street which is now used by the Bahá’í (Bahai) faith.  They later had a new store built across the street in 1947 and it was in use as a grocery store until John Hirko’s death in

Sophie Walen Ferguson taught primary grades in Issaquah Elementary School for several years.  (Her career was one of the reasons the name was shortened.  It was felt it would be difficult for small children to pronounce and spell.  It was sort of a relief to the rest of the family as it was not only little children who had difficulty spelling and pronouncing.)

Joseph Walen had a hardware store on Rainer Avenue in Seattle after the War.

Julia Walen Mourae married right after college.  Her husband worked for Boeing and they lived in many parts of the country until they retired to Lake Lucerne in Maple Valley.

Frank was a claims attorney in Seattle and served as a police judge and notary for the City of Issaquah in 1953 and 54.  He and his wife Carol built a home on the hill across the road from the entrance to the cemetery in 1948.  Several units of the Chopaka apartment complex now cover the site.

William Walen purchased property on the other side of Newport which is now Chopaka.  It was used for cow pasture.  He drove cows across the road by the simple expedience of putting a saw horse in the middle of the road  and leaning a sign on it saying Cow Crossing.  That was just in case a car might come along- which wasn’t very often.

He had a bridge built across Issaquah Creek, which bordered his property, in order to rent additional pasture to the north toward town.  It wasn’t long before residents along Newport Way discovered that going up the lane and across the bridge made a much shorter route to town.  There was a stile at the north side of the field and they could step down onto Alder Street.  The bridge finally succumbed to one of the many floods it endured.

Seeing all of the above area mentioned now covered with buildings, it is getting more and more difficult to remember how close the country was to Historic Downtown Issaquah!

I apologize for scribbles, cross outs, etc. and for being too lazy to copy this over.

When we moved into our home on Cemetery Hill in 1948 there were no other homes in the area except for a small farm which had been vacant for a number of years, but had renters there then.* The place later became Hallenbeck Stables.  There were numerous trails, but no roads except for a primitive access one for Puget Sound which followed the power lines.

We had lived there only a short time when a small logging operation started up.  It averaged one load of logs a day.  Then the Bullet (sp?) family decided to build a retreat at their holdings at the top of Squak Mountain.  (King TV?)  We watched many loads of materials being hauled up there.

Then came George Rowley, the founder of Mountain Park.  The first entrance to the area was right across from our driveway.

After that things changed rapidly.  The little wetland where our boys looked for tadpoles and we enjoyed the springtime frog chorus disappeared.  So did the fairly good sized creek which ran down along side the cemetery and into Issaquah Creek.  It was put underground just below the cemetery.  The trees which lined the road were cut down.  The whole scene was changed.

The population changed too.  The resident bear who lived up behind the cemetery and put in an appearance every once in a while hopefully found a safe haven.  He liked the seedling apples that grew below our place.  The dew of coyotes at the foot of the hill weren’t very popular though.  They were right in behind what is now the Fire Station on Newport.  They liked to dine on the neighbor’s chickens and eggs.  Also their hauling at night wasn’t appreciated.  A group of herons roasted (?) in the big fir trees on the hill behind the fire stations.  We could watch them fly down to fish in the Issaquah Creek.  There were Chinese pheasants and quail who liked to feed in the fields.  Deer and raccoon were plentiful- as well as skunks.

I looked out one calm, summer day to see a pole of string beans bobbing madly about, I raced out, but was only able to see the last of the vines being hauled down a mountain beaver’s hole.  Even they moved on.

When we first moved in we were horrified to realize the hill was open to deer hunting.  For a few days during the season it sounded as if a small war was going on.  I looked out once to see a fellow pointing his gun at a pheasant who was happily stripping earn ? in our gardens which was close to our house.  I did a lot of screaming at him and may even have cussed a bit.

People who lived just south of us after Mt (?) Park was established were supposed to use 12th Street Access.  However, they made a short cut for themselves by cutting across the power line access and onto the narrow road along the cemetery.  In no time at all there was quite a bit of traffic there.  Some water lines became exposed and it was necessary to make repairs.  Each time any repairs were made because of slides or whatever the road got better and better.  Now it is a heavily trafficked roadway.

When we moved into our house in May of 1948 we had no telephone.  Utilities hadn’t caught up in production since the war.  We were denied a phone on the grounds of medical emergency.  We were informed that pregnancy was a natural phenomenon.  That was small comfort to me.  Here I was up on the hill with a small child, no neighbors, no car, no phone, and eight months pregnant.  My in-laws drove up every morning to check on us, but that didn’t seem enough so we worked out a plan.  If I hung a white sheet out of one particular upstairs window, my mother-in-law could spot it by walking out to a certain spot on their property.  Fortunately Frank was able to contact the attorney for the phone company and accommodations were made.  He had to pay $40.00 for a pole to be put in halfway between our house and Newport Way.  That entitled us to be hooked up to an eight party line.  Only a couple of other party rings came into our house, but it was very difficult to find a line not in use.  Two Finnish ladies had a prolonged conversation in Finnish every morning.  Whenever someone did get through to us we had to warn them that we were on a party line- especially if they started to blurt out legal problems.  Fortunately our second son chose to be born when his father was at home and could provide transportation to the Renton Hospital.

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Imogene Woodside

Name: Imogene Woodside (Stuart- husband almost 50 years)

Birth Date or Year (optional):

10-26-22

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

I arrived in Issaquah February 23, 1946 with one and 3 year old sons.  We lived on the dairy farm 22 years adjoining the Lake Sammamish State Park on the eastside.

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

I have always said I was an imported war bride from Arizona to Washington- I could not spell or pronounce Issaquah- I was a city girl and I came to a 150 acre dairy farm.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

We left in May of 1968 as Issaquah was becoming overrun with people and our mode of making a living no longer existed- not as bad as today.  People want to live in the country, but do not like the smell, tractors and the other things that country life brings!

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Both Jim and Roy attended 1-2-3 grades in the old (old) high school building.  I believe Jim was in 3rd grade in the building that later became the lunch room and much later the library.  Then to Clark which was a new building.  From there back to Junior High building and the old high school. They both graduated from the new high school.  Jim in 1961 and Ray in 1963.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

I (Imogene Woodside) did not attend but my husband Stuart graduated in 1939. He was in the Redmond schools before. He enjoyed being in the school play.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

We came to Issaquah for Bill and Esther Bergsma’s 50th anniversary party. Minnie Schomber attended also. The next day we went to see Mrs. Diamond who had just celebrated her 100th birthday. We could hear her on the phone before coming to the door. After greeting us she remarked that she had heard we were in town. She had been on the phone with Minnie Schomber! What wonderful people they were!

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

The Hi School was closed in ’65. Both times in ’49 and ’65 we lost our chimney but the old house was still standing. It was finally torn down after we left in 1968.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Andy Wold’s Hardware.

Ben Sutter’s Feed Store. Some feed for the animals.

Red & White Grocer (Kramer’s) across the street from the Hotel and Fasano’s Restaurant, where we ate some.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Evans’ Beauty Shop.

Dave Lewis Barber Shop. He was the only person that ever cut my boys’ hair until after they graduated from Hi School.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

The oiled floors and all the little drawers!

Tom, Reita and Ed were always so helpful. It was a wonderful place, besides it was a long drive to Renton to purchase any items.

We did go to Kirkland as Bellevue only had one street and blueberry fields!

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

I bought from all of the grocery stores until I went to work for Grange Mercantile Grocery in 1953 or 1954 where I worked for 14 years.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

The Grange Mercantile. sold all kinds of garden tools, feed, hardware and most anything you needed. Of course “Pick” Elsworth Pickering was manager. When I went to work at the Grange, John Kramer was manager. Groceries were about the only thing we sold. I worked with Joan Karvia and Jim Padkranic. John worked mainly in the butcher shop. Joan and I did all the ordering, except produce, and took care of the cash registers. I was to work 3 days a week. I worked only 2 weeks – 3 days and for 14 years 5 & 6 days a week. With 2 boys in Clark Elementary we knew most every one in town. I still have a smock that has my name printed on it that we wore to try to stay clean. I believe the Grange closed in the early 70s. I really enjoyed my time in Issaquah.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

Rena’s Café had wonderful pies! We took our kids to XXX Barrel. Ken and Olg’s kids were about the same age as ours.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

I still go when I return to Issaquah. My favorite is pecan milk chocolate nut sheets. (Rae Pickering and I always called them cow pies.) Julius taught Jim and Ray to ski on Snoqualmie Pass through the YWCA. When I called the YWCA in Seattle to enroll them I was told the classes were only for adults. I said Julius told me to call and the lady said that was fine and enrolled them.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

We were in Fasano’s bar a few times, but never a saloon.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

The Grange Supply fixed equipment. They also sold gas and diesel and had delivery service to the farm. Frank Stickney was the manager for many years. Dick Boni was the deliveryman and Walt Rasnia (?) worked in the shop. Anna Guine (?) and another lady whose name I cannot remember worked in the office. My husband even worked there one winter when farming was slow. Grange supply was always our gas station also.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

Mr. and Mrs. Lawill were always very nice and friendly. The drug story had most everything we needed. For many years we went to Seattle for the dentist and doctors, but Lu filled the prescriptions.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

I can’t remember much about the political activities. I believe Mr. Hepler was involved and a lone lady worked in the Issaquah City office.

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

It was terrible! That is why at the present time I do not know any of the street names at this time. Of course I have been gone for 33 years, but I do return to visit but not often now. I lost 2 close friends the last 3 months.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

I was not there at the time.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

I was not here at the time. My husband joined the service Dec. 1940. We did know many of his friends who returned after the war, as we did. My husband was in the Air Force and we spent most of the war in Kansas where he worked on B-27 & B-29s prior to their going overseas to Europe.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

We had a great time in all the Labor Day Parades. A tent was placed on Memorial Field for all the concessions. We were involved in the Grange Lodge.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

I remember one year I ended up in Nelem’s Hospital after the celebration. I had work to do in the Grange Booth so waited to the day after all was cleaned up. This was probably ’52 or ’53.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

There was always a big dance at the Fireman’s hall by Memorial Field where we all had a wonderful time.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

The schools were always busy with lots of activities. Great High School wrestling matches with Mr. Wilson as coach. Also great football with the town team, Little League as well as High School.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

We hiked on the farm bringing in the cows out of the pastures. Every summer afternoon when my husband brought the cows in from across the road (east side of E. Lake Sammamish Rd.) they would walk down the road to the corner of SE 56th and go into the field across the railroad tracks. Most every day a man going to work swing shift at Boeings would drive behind them from one side of the road to the other. This must have been 4 blocks. At the corner he would wave and be on his way to work. The field is the Fed X Building now. Times were different in those days.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

The Issaquah Creek was by our driveway. I remember the boys, probably 4 & 6, fishing with their dad. Jim came running up to the house with his first fish to show me. As they got older they fished there all the time with lots of fish. In the fall my husband had fun trying to bring the cows into the barn which sat on the east bank of the creek. He would walk through the creek with knee boots and he could hardly step without stepping on a salmon, there were so many. This would have been behind the veterinary hospital today.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Lots of people. Swim or attend the dance. My husband grew up on the west side near the end of Lake Sammamish.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

We spent more time at Alexander’s Beach as our kids were friends of the Harros (?). They swam and went water skiing. George Eck was always Grandpa to the kids. I went water skiing my first time about 35 years old. Stayed up my first try. Did dump on another boat wave in the middle of the lake but was able to get up right away. Ray and Bill Harro (?) are still friends and see one another after almost 50 years.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

I remember seeing the empty space for many years where the mill burned. I also remember the Preston Mill as well as the Red Hall Mill. Madeline was a friend!

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

My husband who lived in Redmond at the time always told about watching the mill burn from the Redmond road on a hill by the Pillie’s.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

It brought great people to Issaquah.

I remember Elmer and Louise Quistorf when Elmer managed the hatchery and Louise taught school. They continued to live in Issaquah until both passed away.

We had no fish problem in those days. Too many people now!

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

In 1946 I went with my husband and 2 boys to the C. W. Peters farm. The big 2 story house sat by the wooden bridge (at that time) on SE 56th. We bought the cows and rented the farm in 1952. We raised grass and hay for the cows’ feed. We did grow corn for silage at one time. We always had a big garden and raised a lot of our food. Our milk was sent in cans to Darigold as Alpine Dairy had been sold. Ray was a member of the Darigold Board before we sold the cows here in La Center.

 

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

In the ’49 earthquake my husband and Rob Pickering were at the Pickering farm doing some work with each on their tractors. They were close to the old silos and moved out in the field to get away from them if they should fall. The boys grew up playing with Rob and Rae’s kids. After the barn was rebuilt Ray was able to go into it and told us all the things that were not the same. I learned at that time there had been a long rope swing in the barn (now) and was used by the Woodside and Pickering kids. What memories!

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

Our milk was finally shipped to Darigold just before we left Issaquah in 1968. I was in the creamery several times but worked next door.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

It was wonderful not to have to go through Renton. It was wonderful when the Floating Bridge opened. I remember I had to go to the Train Depot to pick up Dad Peters. I had been shopping in Issaquah and on my way I remembered I did not have enough money for the toll. I stopped at the Skyport restaurant and cashed a check to be able to pay the toll. Both of us were just new!

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

It was not I-90 but I-10! In fact about half the time I still call it I-10. I crossed I-10 at the Issaquah intersection 4 times a day for the time I worked at Grange Mercantile 14 years. I went home for lunch. Of course there was not a lot of traffic and sometimes I would go 2 lanes, wait, and go the other 2 lanes. The Barlows (who were our friends) got an underpass for their cows to go down to the lake. The one underpass we had used for years was closed.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

I guess we bought our first car in Seattle.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

In 1998 I received my 50 year pin from the Issaquah Valley Grange. Many years ago we held several offices.

We had many great times in the Grange Hall.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

No. Just there once!

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

Only dances and parties.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

All of the above. I helped prepare many a meeting of all kinds in the Grange Hall. I remember a New Years Eve party. Many of us were cleaning up the Hall. There was a bottle of booze left and we nominated Bill Bergsma to take it home. We weren’t big drinkers in those days. Bill went downstairs and at the bottom the door was closed. With his hands full and trying to open the door the wind blew the door against the bottle and smashed it! So much for that bottle!

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

No.

 

What were the working conditions like in the mine? Which mine did you work for, and what was your job?

I remember the mineshafts on the Renton road.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

We were not movie fans but I remember taking the boys to the Saturday show when all the children went.

 

Front Street

I don’t even know which is Front Street!

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

We attended the Community Church by the creek for many years. There were only 2 churches at that time. Many came later.

 

Additional Memories

I really enjoyed my 22 years in early Issaquah. It was a great time and place to raise 2 boys. My husband lived with the C.W. Peters after both his parents died. My father-in-law was a veterinarian in Redmond when Dad Peters was the herdsman for Hollywood Farms – Now the winery Ste. Michelle.

Helen Peters Stackable (daughter) and granddaughter Barbara live just 1 ½ miles from me at this time. So our Issaquah roots go back over 50 years.

Thanks to all the people who are working on this program.

Imogene Woodside

This has been done in a hurry. Hope you can read it!

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