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Downtown History Hike, Part I: 1880-1925

Museum Director, Erica Maniez, will lead participants on a socially-distanced walk through the history of Issaquah, from the late 19th century to approximately 1925. You’ll hear stories of early efforts by hops farmers, the town’s growth during the coal-mining era, and what life was like for residents of Issaquah a century ago. You’ll leave seeing Issaquah’s historic downtown with new eyes!

Participants will meet outside the Issaquah Depot.

-Please wear a mask and. although we love pets, please leave dogs at home.

-Walks are held rain or shine.

-Event capacity is currently capped at 15 people due to COVID restrictions. Please ensure that everyone in your party has their own individual ticket so we do not breach the capacity requirement. Thank you!

Downtown History Hike, Part I: 1880-1925

Museum Director, Erica Maniez, will lead participants on a socially-distanced walk through the history of Issaquah, from the late 19th century to approximately 1925. You’ll hear stories of early efforts by hops farmers, the town’s growth during the coal-mining era, and what life was like for residents of Issaquah a century ago. You’ll leave seeing Issaquah’s historic downtown with new eyes!

Participants will meet outside the Issaquah Depot.

-Please wear a mask and. although we love pets, please leave dogs at home.

-Walks are held rain or shine.

-Event capacity is currently capped at 15 people due to COVID restrictions. Please ensure that everyone in your party has their own individual ticket so we do not breach the capacity requirement. Thank you!

Downtown History Hike, Part I: 1880-1925

Museum Director, Erica Maniez, will lead participants on a socially-distanced walk through the history of Issaquah, from the late 19th century to approximately 1925. You’ll hear stories of early efforts by hops farmers, the town’s growth during the coal-mining era, and what life was like for residents of Issaquah a century ago. You’ll leave seeing Issaquah’s historic downtown with new eyes!

Participants will meet outside the Issaquah Depot.

-Please wear a mask and. although we love pets, please leave dogs at home.

-Walks are held rain or shine.

-Event capacity is currently capped at 15 people due to COVID restrictions. Please ensure that everyone in your party has their own individual ticket so we do not breach the capacity requirement. Thank you!

Downtown History Hike, Part I: 1880-1925

Museum Director, Erica Maniez, will lead participants on a socially-distanced walk through the history of Issaquah, from the late 19th century to approximately 1925. You’ll hear stories of early efforts by hops farmers, the town’s growth during the coal-mining era, and what life was like for residents of Issaquah a century ago. You’ll leave seeing Issaquah’s historic downtown with new eyes!

Participants will meet outside the Issaquah Depot.

-Please wear a mask and. although we love pets, please leave dogs at home.

-Walks are held rain or shine.

-Event capacity is currently capped at 15 people due to COVID restrictions. Please ensure that everyone in your party has their own individual ticket so we do not breach the capacity requirement. Thank you!

Bellevue Hotel

Looking back: Bellevue Hotel

Published in the Issaquah Press on June 24, 1988

LookBack6-24-98BThousands drive by the intersection of Front Street and Sunset Way each day, giving the downtown intersection (below) a thoroughly modern, busy feel despite nearby architecture from the old days. However, the corner has been a busy place for more than 100 years. Thomas and Mary Francis build the Bellevue Hotel on the southeast corner of this intersection, completing construction in May 1888. A very early picture of the structure (above) shows the two-story hotel with board sidewalks on the north and west side, a small one-story addition to the east side and a one-story addition to the rear of the structure. A dining room is located in the back of the hotel, with an entrance on the west side. Even in Squak, Washington Territory, in 1888, the local residents had an eye for nature. Note the small tree that had been planted in front of the hotel, protected by a board frame”

Bellevue Hotel

The Bellevue hotel was completed in May 1888. [IHM photo 72.21.14.217]

Bellevue Hotel

Looking back: Bellevue Hotel

Published in the Issaquah Press on July 1, 1988

Bellevue Hotel

Bellevue Hotel circa 1912. [IHM photo]

The Bellevue Hotel, at the southeast corner of the intersection between Front Street and Sunset Way, was quite a landmark in the early 1900’s. This photo, taken around 1912, shows that the entrance to the hotel was moved to the one story addition on the east side of the building. The double doors provided an entrance to the tavern, where “No Minors Allowed” adorns the glass above the doors. That tree that was so small in the previous photo is now a hearty specimen, and there are both power and telephone poles in place on each side of the structure.

Mill Street

Looking back: Corner of Front and Sunset

Published in the Issaquah Press on July 22, 1998

Mill Street

Looking East down Mill Street, now known as Sunset Way, circa 1920. [IHM photo photo 91.7.91]

In 1917, the Francis family sells the Bellevue Hotel to Wilson Tibbetts, who starts an automotive garage in the building. Tibbetts soon sells to Case and Lee Hepler and, sometime around 1919, the front of the old hotel is removed and a new one-story brick structure is built to house a Ford sales and service center. This view is looking eastward down Mill Street, now known as Sunset Way. The concrete paving of Mill Street, which occurred in the mid-1920s, has yet to be done in this photograph. Later, the dealership becomes Hepler Motors, where model-T Fords cost $365.

Hepler Motors 1948

Looking back: Hepler Motors

Published in the Issaquah Press on July 22, 1998

Hepler Motors 1948

Big debut of 1949 Ford models at Hepler Auto Sales, 1948. Lee Hepler is at left. Girl on right is Beverly Morril, whose father was a salesperson at Hepler. Woman in center is Minnie Schomber. [IHM photo 72.021.014.064H ]

The original site of the 1888 Bellevue Hotel at the corner of Front Street and Sunset Way became home to a Ford dealership, Hepler Motors, in the late 1940s. The last standing portion of the hotel was removed and a new concerte three-bay service area was added to the brick building. Lee Hepler sold the business on his 60th birthday, and the dealership continued as Foothills Ford, Eastage Motors and Malone Ford before it was demolished following damage suffered in the 1965 earthquake.

Front Street and Sunset Way 1971

Looking back: Corner of Front and Sunset

Published in the Issaquah Press on July 29, 1998

Front Street and Sunset Way 1971

Front Street and Sunset Way 1971 [IHM photo photo 72.21.14.118L]

As our trek through time nears modern day, we find that the southeast corner of the Front Street and Sunset Way intersection has evolved a great deal since the Bellevue Hotel first stood there in 1888. After the Ford dealership was torn down after the 1965 earthquake, the popular corner became home to a gas station. This photo, take in 1971, shows a Gulf station at the location. Later it was to become a Gull station before Texaco grabbed the location. Note the flashing light to help traffic through the intersection-and the signs of retail development behind the gas station.

 

Bank of Issaquah

Looking back: Bank of Issaquah

Published in the Issaquah Press on August 5, 1998

Bank of Issaquah

Bank of Issaquah. [IHM photo 89.13.4]

Banks will be the topic of Looking Back for the next few weeks. The top photo is the very first bank in Issaquah, appropriately called First Bank. It was founded by W.W. Sylvester and located in what was then the old Mine Co. office building, according to records kept by the Issaquah Historical Society. Today, the Front Street location of First Bank would be best pinpointed as the north end of the Wold Building, between the old two-story Oddfellows Hall and the basketry shop. (as seen in bottom photo).

 

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