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Mill Street Looking East - 1924

Looking back: Mill Street Looking East – 1924

Published in the Issaquah Press on March 7, 2001

Mill Street Looking East - 1924

Mill Street Looking East – 1924 [IHM photo 95.21.1]

As we stand at what is now the intersection of First Place Northwest and West Sunset Way, we are looking east towards Front Street in this 1924 Mill Street view. On the left is a vacant lot where the new library is under construction. Behind the second power pole on the left is the Andrew L. Wold Co. building, and in front of the pole is the railroad crossing sign marking the tracks across the intersection leading to the coal mines on Mine Hill Road.

The tracks were abandoned this year, but were not removed until many years later. On the right is the Red Crown Service Station (now the Rogue Issaquah Brewhouse). Street parking, including enforcement, were not a problem as indicated by the few cars on the street and the one in front of the service station facing the wrong direction.

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Mill Street Looking West

Looking back: Mill Street Looking West – circa 1915

Published in the Issaquah Press on March 14, 2001

Mill Street Looking West

A Ford Model T on Mill Street looking west. [IHM photo 93-26-1]

The photographer taking this circa 1915 photograph must be the driver of this early Model T Ford as the car’s driver is missing. The woman and two children in the car are looking back towards Saint Joseph’s Catholic Church which was on the north side of Mill Street (now East Sunset Way mid-block between Third and Fifth avenues northeast). The first Catholic services were held in the Michael Donlan log cabin in 1883. The cabin and Michael’s son’s sawmill was located where the existing Mormon church is now on Sixth Avenue Southeast. Lumber from the sawmill was used to build this building in 1896 as a home for the church. The Coca Cola sign on the building on the left reminds us that about 1915 was when Coca Cola introduced its trademark bottle design still used today.

 

 

Front Street Looking South

Looking back: Front Street Looking South – circa 1910

Published in the Issaquah Press on April 4, 2001

Front Street Looking South

Front Street Looking South – circa 1910 [IHM photo 72.21.14.201]

As we look south down Front Street in 1910. we see several well known businesses. The building at the far right edge of the photo is the Bank of Issaquah (now a bicycle shop). The buildings on the left (from foreground to background) are Van Winkle’s Store, Pacific Hotel, Cubbon’s Grocery, Gibson Drugs, Barber Shop, IOOF Hall, Clark’s Saloon, Holmes “Tailor”, Garner’s Barber Shop, Soapy Smith Candy, and E. J. Anderson’s Hardware Building (now called the Wold Building where Jak’s Grill is located).

 

 

Front Sreet from south

Looking back: Front Street Looking North – circa 1911

Published in the Issaquah Press on April 11, 2001

Front Sreet from south

Front Street Looking North – circa 1911 [IHM photo 72.21.14.214]

This early 1913 photo leads one to ask: Would the pedestrian standing in the middle of Front Street be willing to stand there today? The picture, taken looking north from a point that’s north of Mill Street (now Sunset Way), shows the striped barber pole (next to the utility pole) in front of William Garner’s Tonsorial Artist Shop. Baths are available there. The sign on the side of the building next to the barber pole is C. R. Berry advertising his real estate office, which was there until July 1913, when he moved to the Issaquah Bank building. Note the wavy wooden sidewalks on both sides of the street.

 

 

Front and Sunset

Looking back: Front Street Looking North – circa 1913

Published in the Issaquah Press on April 18, 2001

Front and Sunset

Intersection of Sunset Way (formerly Mill Street) and Front Street, looking north. ca 1913 [IHM photo 72.21.14.191A]

This early 1913 photo leads one to ask: Would the pedestrian standing in the middle of Front Street be willing to stand there today? The picture, taken looking north from a point that’s north of Mill Street (now Sunset Way), shows the striped barber pole (next to the utility pole) in front of William Garner’s Tonsorial Artist Shop. Baths are available there. The sign on the side of the building next to the barber pole is C. R. Berry advertising his real estate office, which was there until July 1913, when he moved to the Issaquah Bank building. Note the wavy wooden sidewalks on both sides of the street.

 

 

Day House

Day Garage and House

Day House

Day House. July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

William Day worked on Mine Hill (Squak Mountain) during the boom times of Issaquah’s mining days. In 1914, he built this house for his son, Frank, and Frank’s new wife, Alberta. Their daughters June and Alice were born here.

World War 1 took Frank to Alaska as a truck driver. To provide added income, Alberta converted part of the sweeping front porch into a bathroom and turned the spacious home into a boarding house. She lived in this same home until her death.

Day Garage

Day Garage. July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A. P. Burrows House

A. P. Burrows House

A. P. Burrows House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

This house has had many occupants, A.P. Burrows, founder of Issaquah’s first newspaper, The Issaquah Independent, built it for his family sometime between 1900 and 1912. Soon after its completion, a Mr. DeChesne, a high school French teacher, his sister and mother rented it from Burrows.

Two years later, Mr. and Mrs. Albin Ek took occupancy. Ek ran a confectionery store in Issaquah until he volunteered for service in World War I. After he left, Mrs. Ek lived alone until 1917 when Ray Schneider, a former druggist from Iowa, took over the place, with his wife, Lena, while he worked for the First National Bank of Issaquah.

The Burrows house was later occupied by a lumberman, Jay King, and then by Mr. and Mrs. Louis Podkranic.  Mr. Podkranic’s sister-in-law, Rose Sellers, and her husband, Daniel Ralph, donated the home to Gilman Village.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smart Garage

Smart Garage

Smart Garage

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

Lawrence and Lulu Smart lived in this garage in 1913 while Lawrence was building their new home.

In 1914, they converted the building into a storage area for coal and wood and allowed enough space to park their Anderson, a stylish touring car, which was their first vehicle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smart House

Smart House

Smart House

Front view of the Smart House. July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

Lawrence and Lulu Smart owned this house from 1914, the year he built it, until the family fell on hard times during the Depression. Lawrence worked at the local milk canning plant, then called Alpine Creamery, now Darigold.

In 1916, when Lulu got sick the couple moved in with parents on the Anderson Farm where Lake Sammamish State Park is now located. The Smart house was then rented to Leonard and Mary Miles, who ran the Red and White Grocery on Sunset Way.

Later, the Smarts returned to the house only to leave again in 1927 when Lawrence inherited a farm in Fall City. The house was rented out until lost in foreclosure.

In 1933, the new owner was Hugo Johnson, a mechanic for the Issaquah school buses.

Smart House

Side view of the Smart House. July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Huovar House

Huovar House

Huovar House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

Representing a type of architecture known as a “miner’s house,” this modest cottage is believed to have been built around 1910 by a Finnish carpenter. The house was first moved during a road revision and land exchange, ending up at what is now Front Street and Gilman Blvd. Located next door was the Huovar Motel. The Huovar family (parents John and Helja Huovar, and children John, Anita, and Lyllevan) lived in the home and operated the nearby hotel. The property was then purchased by Bill Skorp, who gave the house to Gilman Village in 1984.