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Wold House

Wold House

Wold House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

Lars Arndt Wold, his wife, Henrietta, and children Mary, Andrew, Ludwig and Sena, made their home here in 1908. The house (called “The Wold” in the community) is the only building in Gilman Village which remains in its original location. Except for the deck entrance, the exterior remains unchanged. The large handmade railings with the graceful curves were saved from the home’s interior.

The Wold family was part of this corner of Issaquah for most of the century. The Wold daughters were active in the community. Sena was bookkeeper at the Standard Oil Bulk Plant and was known for raising police dogs. Mary was trained as both a teacher and a nurse. She served as a Red Cross nurse during World War I, in Siberia.

One of the outstanding features of the home is its 70-year-old garden which remains intact in Gilman Village. The stonework pools done by “Uncle Carl”, the unusual plants such as cucumber leaf magnolia, atlas blue cedar, and Japanese red maples as well as the apple orchard all remain just as the Wolds enjoyed them.

See Also:  Wold Family History (Issaquah Press Article)
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Granary

The Granary

The Granary

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

Part of a working farm is keeping the animals fed and healthy. The granary was the storage for feed for the family’s chickens which used to roam the orchard. It stands in its original location. The Wold property itself is bounded on the west by Issaquah Creek.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hop Shed

Hop Shed

Hop Shed

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

Sometimes saving a tree has played as important a part in developing Gilman Village as saving a building. A case in point is the tower-like building between the Wold Barn and Granary. To avoid cutting down the venerable oak tree located there, the Baylis Architects designed a structure reminiscent of the hop sheds which were a part of the agricultural history of the valley.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wold Barn

Wold Barn

Wold Barn

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Though a little larger than when first built, the Wold barn is just a few yards from its home site. The barn was a 1908 project of the Wold family, pioneers of the Issaquah Valley. When it became part of Gilman Village in 1979 it was completely dismantled, moved, expanded, and reassembled using as much original material as possible. The architecture remains the same.

 

 

 

Wold Barn

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Court House

Court House

Court House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

This charming home graced the S.W. corner of Dogwood and Rainier Blvd. from 1890 to 1979. Constructed by a man named Putnam (probably either Meyers or George Frank Putnam), the home remains basically the same today as when first built. The only change has been the addition of a full front porch instead of a small entry portico with peaked roof.

Putnam sold the home to the Finstrom family. The third daughter, Hilda, married Mr. Court and moved to Seattle, but returned to the family home when her husband died. She remained their until her death.

The home was used for the offices of Benton-McCarthy Realty until 1979 when construction of their new building began.

Renovations for Gilman Village include exposure of the original tongue and groove siding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

McQuade House

McQuade House

McQuade House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

John McQuade, an immigrant to Pennsylvania from Ireland in 1871, was Mayor of Gilman when it’s name was changed to Issaquah in 1899. The intervening years of his life were spent mining gold, silver, and coal from Montana to the Cariboo gold fields in British Columbia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Market

The Market

The Market

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

An architectural solution to an unfinished end led to the emergence of an open air marketplace alive with the color of fresh flowers and produce, the smells of baking croissants and cinnamon rolls and the excitement of discovering foods and wines of the region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don's Drive-In

Don’s Drive-In

Don's Drive-In

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Don’s Drive-In, in its early days a gas station, was typical of the first fast food operations in the country. It served corn dogs on a stick in an atmosphere of early red vinyl. It was renovated in 1976 not only in structural but culinary taste. A new addition toward Gilman Blvd. was added to the original building in February 1978.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Feed Store

The Feed Store

The Feed Store

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Though now standing close to the Mine Warehouse, the Feed Store was once the front, or business end, of the building.

The two-story structure with its traditional frontier false front was an Issaquah landmark dating from 1910 when it was built by E.J. Anderson. For many years it was the supply for grain and hay to local farmers and dairymen.

The building was moved in 1975 along with the warehouse to Gilman Village. As workmen began removing the siding over the false front they discovered the original Fisher Feed sign which remains.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mine Superintendent's House

Mine Superintendent’s House

Mine Superintendent's House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

This home has a history of mining and war behind it. Built in 1913 for Count Alvo Von Alvensleben, a tall dark captain in the Kaiser’s Cavalry, it was elegant for its time. There is some question whether the captain actually occupied the home. It was known as Devana to local residents for many years, though no one seems to know why.

The count supposedly was in the Northwest representing the Kaiser’s personal interest in mining when he came to Issaquah to supervise chemicals in mine production. He had previously been working in British Columbia, but was expelled from Canada when war was declared. He came to the United States with the permission of President Wilson.

Some sources say the count was recalled to Germany when we also declared war, but a personal friend of Von Alvensleben reported that he was interned for the duration of the war. He is said to have written a letter of protest daily to the Swiss embassy using Greek or Latin as code. He became a U.S. citizen in 1936.

The house was set on five acres just off Wildwood Boulevard, now the site of condominiums, before it was moved to Gilman Village in 1977. It was built entirely of fir using tongue and groove construction.

The Taylor family of Issaquah bought the house in 1944 and did some remodeling. Many other Issaquah families lived in the home over the years.

When moved to Gilman Village in 1977 it had degenerated into a shabby dwelling known as “Alien Acres”. Though the interior of the house has been changed, the exterior once again reflects the elegance of its beginning.