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Nick's Shop

Nick’s Shop

Nick's Shop

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Nick Schroeder built this shop as a general fix-it workshop in the 1920’s. The lumber was provided by Nick’s brother in Fall City.

The building had an attached blacksmith shop with a combination post drill, whet stone, and post stand grinder operated by a single electrical motor through a combination of changing belts and gears believe to be one of a kind.

During the Depression, Nick repaired the town’s bicycles, cars, logging gear and just about everything else with tools he often improvised himself.

Nick’s Shop was simply moved across the road to be connected to the Pedegana House in 1977.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pedegana House

Pedegana House

Pedegana House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

In 1889 Joseph Pedegana, son of Peter and Mary Pedegana, was born in this house. At that time it was long and thin with a wide front porch and a lean-to kitchen.

The house changed owners in 1903 when the Babik family purchased it and remodeled it further, adding more bedrooms and a shake siding over the original clapboard. Susie Babik was born here and the house remained in the Babik family until the late 1950’s. It was moved to Gilman Village in 1977.

Pedegana House

Back side of the Pedegana House. July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mine Warehouse

Mine Warehouse

Mine Warehouse

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Stand on the boardwalk a few feet from this building and look down the front of the shops and you will notice a definite curve. This was not the result of some warped siding; it was built that way in 1925 by E.J. Anderson. The building originally was located at the corner of Front and Sunset Way along a spur line of the Northern Pacific Railway. The bend in the building coincides with the bend in the track. Buildings on the other side of the intersection are angled in much the same way.

Historically the building was a warehouse for the hay and feed arriving from eastern Washington. It was also said to store timbers for the mines. It was the business place for the pioneer Wold family for decades.

Under terms of the 50-year lease from the railroad, all buildings had to be removed from the site when the lease expired, April 1, 1975. In March of that year, the warehouse was separated from the main building, cut into four sections and reassembled, curve and all, at the present location.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louis Monti House

Louis Monti House

Louis Monti House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

The Monti house was originally a lean-to structure which Louis Monti bought in 1910 to use as the basis for a home for his family. It stood near the old high school, now the site of Issaquah swimming pool, until it was moved in 1975 to make way for the expansion of Issaquah Jr. High.

Small and boxlike, it is typical of the many homes in Issaquah built during the early years of the 1900’s which still dot the residential area adjoining the business district.

 

 

 

 

 

Greyhound Depot

Greyhound Depot

Greyhound Depot

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Not all the buildings incorporated into Gilman Village proved salvageable. Gilman Village purchased the Eastside’s only Greyhound Bus Terminal in 1977. When workmen tore away the rotted portions, there was no place to stop. So the building was dismantled to its concrete foundations. Since the design for the renovation had encompassed the original structure, builders simply went ahead as planned with a recontruction of the bus terminal.

 

 

 

 

Schomber Garage

Schomber Garage

Schomber Garage

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Built in 1922, the Schomber garage has evolved from garage to barn to tiny shop to a whole new wing of Gilman Village. The newly created building provided a comfortable transition between the old houses along the deck to the roadway, Gilman Blvd.

 

 

 

 

Dons Quick Stop

Don’s Quick Stop

Dons Quick Stop

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Two sisters, Emily Darst Walker and Inez Darst Gunderson, ran the Swanee Grocery along what is now Gilman Boulevard for years. Later residents remember it as Don’s Quick Stop. It was part of a rapidly deteriorating assortment of odds and ends once cited by IREQ (Issaquah Residents for Environmental Quality) as the worst looking commercial strip in Issaquah.

 

 

 

 

Schomber House II

Schomber House II

Schomber House II

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

One of the most charming stories of Gilman Village is the story of the rhododendron. It was planted in front of the second Schomber house when it was completed in 1936 by Henry Schomber, son of the Issaquah baker, next door to the family home on Front Street.

When the Schomber home was moved to Gilman Village in 1974, the then 38-year-old family rhodie was moved too. The house itself underwent a major face and roof lift when it arrived in its present location to accommodate businesses on the second floor.

 

 

 

Schomber House

Schomber House

Schomber House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

The Schomber House is another twice-moved Gilman Village treasure. It was built in 1900 along Front Street beside the family bakery. The house was relocated in 1921 on the site now housing Rainier Bank. During the moving, Harry Schomber, a boy at the time, slept nights in the upstairs of the house.

The house’s original foundation contained some of the bricks from the first baking oven which Schomber’s daughter, Gertrude, says he dismantled when he converted his bakery oven to coke fuel. The bricks now appear at the base of the present green-house window and the garden wall in Gilman Village.

 

 

Anderson House II

Anderson House II

Anderson House II

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

This was the permanent family home built by Albert Anderson, a native of Issaquah. The exact date of construction is not clear, but it was probably completed in the late 1920’s. The house has architecturally the same exterior, with its notable three-peaked roof, as when it was moved from its former location (across from the Darigold Dairy) on Front Street in 1972. It has been decorated inside with wall paper and furniture representing the period of construction.