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From the Digital Collections: Happy Halloween!

Halloween Postcard ca 1912
Full Record

 

“The Highest Expectations for Halloween!”

Postcard from “Aunt Minnie” to “Master Bennie Trigg” of Issaquah, WA. Postmarked October 24, 1912.

See all Halloween related records

Looking for Local History: Ed Mott and WAM 2012 Wrap-Up

And so concludes Washington Archives Month 2012! We hope that you’ve been following our daily posts on Pinterest and Facebook as well as the occasional blog here.

We’ve been saving the best for last: a part of our Issaquah Oral History Video (available here in our online gift shop – this is a collection of stories told by the Issaquah people who lived them), this is a section called “True Crime in a Small Town.”

Ed Mott ca 1967-68
Full Record

It features Ed Mott, an Issaquah Police Officer who experienced everything from small crimes to D.B. Cooper and Ted Bundy. He tells his own personal stories about being first one on the scene to one of Ted Bundy’s crime scenes and much more. See the video posted below.

All of these items posted during Washington Archives Month are made possible by generous grants from 4Culture. But a lot of what we do is made possible by donations and volunteers in the community. We hope you will consider donating, volunteering, or becoming a member. Or just stop by and visit one of our museums!

Looking for Local History: Law & Order – IHM edition

 

 

We’ve done tutorials in the past on how to search our digital collections so this will just be a general refresher – only with a focus on our Washington Archives Month 2012 theme: Law and Order.
We’ve made searching for these sort of things easy. I think the best way to do this is either with Click & Search or Keyword Search. We’ll start with the former.
Click & Search
Begin by going to our Digital Collections. On the left you’ll see the navigation bar. Click on the button labeled “Click & Search”.
The next page will show you many different fields from which to search. For our purposes, we’ll be focusing on “Subjects.” Click on the letter that corresponds to your search term – as you can see in the image we’ve chosen “Law and Order.” Other relevant search terms you may try are “Police Department”, “Police Station”, and “Crime”.
Doing this will bring up all the records that have those search terms in their record.
Keyword Search
Another good option for searching for records would just be to use a simple Keyword Search – same as any search engine. Click on “Keyword Search” from the navigation bar. Type in what you’re searching for – in this case, “police.”

 

You can also narrow your search by using the box on the right. You can choose to eliminate records with no image, or search only within certain records.
Once you’ve searched, there are more ways of narrowing your search. First, you can see within the records where the word you’ve searched for has shown up – the word is in bold pink text.
At the top tells you how many records were found, and how many of each type. And on the right you can again narrow your search results.
Be sure to check out all of our other tutorials for great information on how to do your own research, both within our records and other places on the internet. Click here for those blog entries.

From the Digital Collections: “Finding the Site of the Attack on Chinese Laborers in Squak Valley”

A wonderful record from our collection comes to us just recently – January, 2010. Tim Greyhavens, in a project called No Place for Your Kind, documented in a photographic narrative contemporary locations in America where anti-Chinese violence took place.

Greyhavens location of attack on Chinese hop pickers

As a part of that project, Tim came to Issaquah and attempted to find the exact location of the infamous attack on Chinese hop pickers on the Wold brothers’ farm. By using as much information as he could glean from all accounts of the attack he was able to find the most probable location of that attack.

We have the document he prepared which includes his photographs and various primary sources (including transcriptions of many newspaper articles concerning the attack.) You can find the document in PDF format here in our online digital collections.

Tim Greyhavens was featured in The New York Times Lens Blog on August 13, 2012. You can see more of his project at his website http://www.noplaceproject.com/.

Ray Robertson

Issaquah History Museums Celebrates Washington Archives Month!

 

Welcome to WashingtonArchives Month, October 2012!

Ray Robertson and his two oldest children
Full Record

The purpose of Archives Month is “to celebrate the value of Washington’s historical records, to publicize the many ways these records enrich our lives, to recognize those who maintain our communities’ historical records, and to increase public awareness of the importance of preserving historical records in archives, historical societies, museums, libraries and other repositories across the state.”

In short, we’d like to share more of our archives with you.

This year’s theme?

Law and Order in the Archives: Crooks, Cops, and Courts

As you may (or may not) know, Issaquah has some interesting stories in this theme. Over the month we’ll share some of the more simple records like town marshals, “progressive” police cars, and great pictures from our collection. We’ll also touch on people like D.B. Cooper and Ted Bundy and share how they relate to Issaquah’s history.

Everyday we’ll share with you via Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest, a link of the day – either to our website or digital collections – that will take you further into the theme of law and order in Issaquah.

As you can see from previous blog posts and our digital collections, much of what we will share with you was made available by a generous grant from 4Culture.

Another way we can continue to share our collections with you is through generous donations made by the community. If you’d like to support our work, Archives Month 2012, and our ability to share it with you, you can help in the following ways:

–     Visit either of our museums (or both!) in Issaquah.

Gilman Town Hall Museum
165 SE Andrews Street
Issaquah, WA 98027

Hours:
Thursday-Saturday, 11am-3pm

Admission:
$2/adult, $1/child, $5/family of 3+
$10 family pass gives all-day access to both museums
Friends of the Issaquah History Museums visit for free

Issaquah Depot Museum
150 First Avenue NE
Issaquah, WA 98027

Hours:
Friday- Sunday, 11am-3pm

Admission:
$2/adult, $1/child, $5/family of 3+
$10 family pass gives all-day access to both museums
Friends of the Issaquah History Museums visit for free

–     Join us! Become a member of the Issaquah History Museums.

–     Make a donation.

–     Volunteer!

–     Follow us on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, YouTube, and our blog.

    Subscribe to our newsletter.

So follow us this month as we share with you some great records we have in our archives and come learn about your local history!

From the Digital Collections: Issaquah Labor Day Celebration

 

Labor Day Parade, 1910s
Full Record

“They are going to have a big time here Labor Day. They are going to have sports as usual in the afternoon, the races for the children, Ladies race, Leap Frog Race, Old Mans Race, Base Running & Ball throwing and all sorts of things.”
– Letter from Minnie Wilson to her fiancé Jake Schomber, August 30, 1919
Full Record

Want to read more about Issaquah’s notorious Labor Day Celebrations? See our blog post from September 1, 2011. Want to see more pictures from previous Issaquah Labor Day Celebrations? Head over to our Digital Collections and search for “Labor Day”.

From the Digital Collections: Happy 4th of July!

Girls in Patriotic Garb on 4th of July
Full Record

 

“As more families moved to the area and began building a community together, celebrations became part of the social fabric. Pictured here circa 1915 are celebrants of the Fourth of July.”
– p42, #62 Arcadia book caption

See All July 4th Related Records

From the Digital Collections: Happy Father’s Day

Father’s Day Postcard ca 1911
Full Record

“To dear Father
This little card
I send you
To wish you cheer
May health and wealth
attend you
Both far and near.”

Postcard addressed to Mr. Benjamin Price, Taylor, Wash. from J.J. Trigg. Postmarked Issaquah, Wash., May 20, 1911.

Looking for Local History: Using our Digital Collections: Searching By Date

 

Searching for specific dates is a useful tool when researching. We recommend that you utilize Advanced Search when looking for certain dates and time periods. Although, Keyword Search and Click & Search have their place, and we will cover how to use them in searching for dates as well. 

 

 

Things to Know:

 

          Our dates are formatted as follows:
o   YYYY/MM/DD
o   YYYY/MM
o   YYYY

 

          Sometimes we only know about what time a photograph or object is from; as in, circa 1920. These are dated as follows:
o   YYYY ca. (e.g. 1923 ca.)
o   YYYYs (e.g. 1920s)

 

          Some items in the collections do not have specific dates, but merely ranges (oftentimes, broad ranges.) This is why searching with the Year Range function in Advanced Search is the recommended method (see below.)

 

Advanced Search 

 

1.       Click on the “Advanced Search” button on the left-hand side. Enter any non-date specific information you want to search for in the appropriate boxes. 

 

2.       When searching for dates with Advanced search, you have two options: 

 

a.       You can enter a specific date (see above formats) in the box labeled “Date”. This will search for that specific number in either the Date field, or the Year Range fields. It will NOT however include dates that fall into a range with numbers other than the one you typed in. For example, if you are searching with the year 1914 in the Date field, you would get records with a Year Range 1914-1918 but NOT 1913-1918, even though 1914 falls within that range. 

 

b.      You can use the Year Range feature in the Advanced Search by entering in your “Start Date” and “End Date.” This will give you results with dates within that range. This is the recommended method. 

 

3.       On the right hand side, there is a box with options for narrowing your search. You can search for only records with images by clicking the button labeled “Only records with images. You can also search specific content sections in our database. If you’re not sure what you’re looking for, it’s recommended to search “All Content”. To search one or more specific sections, click the box next to the section you wish to search. 

 

4.       Click the Search button and your results will appear on the next page. To view the item record, click on the text link. To view only the image, click on the thumbnail and it will pop up into a new window as a larger image.

 

Keyword Search 

 

The main page of our Digital Collections is the Keyword Search. Should you navigate away from the page, you can return to it either by clicking “Home” or “Keyword Search” from the left-hand buttons.  

 

Using Keyword Search for dates will bring you some interesting results. With Keyword Search you can search outside of our Date format. Sometimes the date in the Description field of an item will include the name of a month (e.g. October) instead of its numerical form. (It should be noted you can search for this in Advanced Search by entering the month name into the “Description” search field.) 

 

To Use Keyword Search: 

 

1.       In the box on the main page, enter the date or text you are looking for. Putting quotes around the text will search for ONLY that phrase – exactly as you’ve typed it. 

 

2.       As in Advanced Search, you can limit your results to records with images only, and choose which section/s you wish to search (or search All Content). Click the Search button and your results will appear on the next page. To view the item record, click on the text link. To view only the image, click on the thumbnail and it will pop up into a new window as a larger image.

 

Click & Search 

 

Using the Click & Search is a fun way to peruse the Digital Collections. When searching for date specific information in our database, it’s a good way to see what is available within certain time periods. 

 

To Use Click & Search: 

 

1.       Click on the left-hand button labeled “Click & Search.” 

 

2.       You will see rows labeled different things, all with letters of the alphabet following them. In the row labeled “Date”, click on “#”. Find the date range you are looking for and click the link.  

 

3.       A dropdown box will appear. Click on the down arrow and make your selection. As you can see some years have a lot of specific dates, and others not as many.  

 

4.       Your search results will appear on the next page. To view the item record, click on the text link. To view only the image, click on the thumbnail and it will pop up into a new window as a larger image.

 

Looking for Local History: Using Our Digital Collections: Finding People

There are a few ways to go about finding people in our Digital Collections. You can use Keyword Search, Advanced Search, or Click & Search. There are reasons for using each one, and I will go through them here. 

 

Keyword Search

 

Using the Keyword Search is your basic catch-all search, just like an internet search engine. Simply type in what you are looking for and you’ll receive your results. The Keyword Search searches all available fields including Name, Description, Title, Collection, etc.  

 

The main page of our Digital Collections is the Keyword Search. Should you navigate away from the page, you can return to it either by clicking “Home” or “Keyword Search” from the left-hand buttons.

 

To find people using Keyword Search: 

 

1.       In the box on the main page, enter the name you are looking for. Putting quotes around the name will search for ONLY that phrase – exactly as you’ve typed it. This is not really recommended when searching for names, as often times maiden names, nicknames, and other spellings will be excluded from your results. 

 

2.       On the right hand side, there is a box with options for narrowing your search. You can search for only records with images by clicking the button labeled “Only records with images. 

 

3.       You can also search specific content sections in our database. If you’re not sure what you’re looking for, it’s recommended to search “All Content”. To search one or more specific sections, click the box next to the section you wish to search. 

 

4.       Click the Search button and your results will appear on the next page. To view the item record, click on the text link. To view only the image, click on the thumbnail and it will pop up into a new window as a larger image.
Click & Search 

 

Using the Click & Search is a fun way to peruse the Digital Collections. It is also helpful when finding people if you aren’t sure of the spelling of a name or have limited information. It is also fun just to browse! 

 

To find people using Click & Search: 

 

1.       Click on the left-hand button labeled “Click & Search.”

 

2.       You will see rows labeled different things, all with letters of the alphabet following them. In the row labeled “People”, select the letter of the last name of the person you are researching.

 

3.       A dropdown box will appear. Click on the down arrow and make your selection.

 

4.       Your search results will appear on the next page. To view the item record, click on the text link. To view only the image, click on the thumbnail and it will pop up into a new window as a larger image.
 
Advanced Search

 

Using Advanced Search is helpful if you want to search specific fields for names or you have other parameters you wish to use to narrow down your results.

 

To find people using Advanced Search

 

1.       Click on the left-hand button labeled “Advanced Search.”

 

2.       You will see different fields you search. Each of these boxes searches the database in the specific field labeled to the left. Entering a name in each box will search ONLY that field in our database for that name. As in Keyword Search you can use quotation marks to search for specific phrases.


3.       Enter names and other information you wish to search by in the boxes. Choose which parameter you wish for your results to sort by clicking the radio button next to the box.

 

4.       As in Keyword Search, you can limit your results to records with images only, and choose which section/s you wish to search (or search All Content). Click the Search button and your results will appear on the next page. To view the item record, click on the text link. To view only the image, click on the thumbnail and it will pop up into a new window as a larger image.


Tip: If narrowing your results in Advanced Search based on date, you have two options:

 

1.       You can enter a specific date (format: YYYY/MM/DD; YYYY/MM; or YYYY) in the box labeled “Date”. This will search for that specific number in either the Date field, or the Year Range fields. It will NOT however include dates that fall into a range with numbers other than the one you typed in. For example, if you are searching with the year 1914 in the date field, you would get records with a Year Range 1914-1918 but NOT 1913-1918, even though 1914 falls within that range.

 

2.       You can use the Year Range feature in the Advanced Search by entering in your “Start Date” and “End Date.” This will give you results with dates within that range. This is the recommended method. 


Things to Know 

 

·         Generally, women are listed by their married name. However, their maiden name is included in their full name listing  (if known) and is therefore searchable using Keyword and Advanced Search.
·         From any page on our Digital Collections you can click the button on the left-hand side labeled “Help” for more information.
·         When viewing the Full Record of an item you can click on a name and then click on “Related Records” to view all Records with that name. This is just like finding the name through “Click & Search.”